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Scout Books publishes what it calls Pocket Books, and one features Virginia Woolf. The tome includes “Kewscoutbooks_forevermodern_06-600x600 Gardens,” along with other short stories and features illustrations by Jennifer Parks. Fitting enough.

Doesn’t one always think of the past, in a garden with men and women lying under the trees? – Kew Gardens by Virginia Woolf

Another unique Woolf edition is the Folio Society’s Mrs. Dalloway, illustrated by Lizzy Stewart. Sady, though, it is out of print.

Between the Acts stage adaptationVirginia Woolf’s final novel Between the Acts (1941) has been adapted for the stage by John Schmor, associate professor of theater arts at the University of Oregon.

Schmor, who said that he didn’t choose the play, the play chose him, described the staging as “spare” so that Woolf’s “wonderful way with words” is highlighted.

Remaining performances are today and July 31 through Aug. 2 at 8 p.m. at Hope Theatre in the UO’s Miller Theatre Complex on East 11th Avenue near Kincaid Street.

Tickets are $5 general admission, at the door. For information, call 541-346-1791.

Virginia Woolf bits

Some Virginia Woolf tidbits on a sunny July day too fine to stay indoors blogging:

If you won’t be able to take a seat on the Mrs. Dalloway bench in Gordon Square, this summer, you can still see it up close. Artist Fiona Osborne of One Red Shoe has generously shared photos of the bench at various stages of her artistic process.

If you look closely, you can even see her workspace in some of the photos, including drop cloth, paint pots and brushes, a blow dryer, and natural light streaming through a round window.

Osborne’s Mrs. Dalloway bench is one of  50 installed by the National Literacy Trust for its Books About Town art trail. Each is shaped as an open book and is decorated by a professional illustrator or local artist.

Side view of the Mrs. Dalloway bench

Side view of the Mrs. Dalloway bench

 

Front view featuring Clarissa Dalloway

Front view featuring Clarissa Dalloway

Front view in progress

Front view in progress

Close-up of back view featuring Septimus Warren Smith

Close-up of back view featuring Septimus Warren Smith

Back view in progress

Back view in progress

Detail of the orchid

Detail of the orchid

Detail of the swallow

Detail of the swallows

The Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain, in association with the National Portrait Gallery NPG catalogueexhibition,  “Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision,” will hold a one-day conference on Thursday, July 17.

The event will feature Professor Frances Spalding CBE, curator of the exhibition and professor of art history at Newcastle University, and Professor Maggie Humm, School of Arts and Digital Industries, University of East London.

The location is the Ondaatje Lecture Theatre, National Portrait Gallery, London WC2H 0HE, and the schedule is as follows:

2:30 p.m.: Registration
3 p.m.: Frances Spalding
4 p.m.: Tea
4.30 p.m.: Maggie Humm
5.30 p.m.: Panel discussion

COST: £25 for non-members of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain. For bookings: contact Lindsay Martin at lindsay@lindsaycmartin.co.uk

Becoming Virginia WoolfBecoming Virginia Woolf: Her Early Diaries and the Diaries She Read by Barbara Lounsberry, is out this month from the University Press of Florida.

According to the publisher’s website, “Starting with fourteen-year-old Woolf’s first palm-sized leather diary, Becoming Virginia Woolf illuminates how her private and public writing was shaped by the diaries of other writers including Samuel Pepys, James Boswell, the French Goncourt brothers, Mary Coleridge, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Woolf’s “diary parents”–Sir Walter Scott and Fanny Burney. These key literary connections open a new and indispensable window onto the story of one of literature’s most renowned modernists.”

Lounsberry is professor emerita of English at the University of Northern Iowa. She is the author of The Art of Fact: Contemporary Artists of Nonfiction and coeditor of Writing Creative Nonfiction: The Literature of Reality.

Lounsberry’s deeply researched and gracefully written book shows not only Woolf’s development into a great diarist but also her evolvement into the fiction and nonfiction writer revered today.–Gay Talese, author of A Writer’s Life

The National Literacy Trust book bench illustrating Mrs. Dalloway has been installed in Gordon Square, Mrs. Dalloway bench with mapBloomsbury for eight weeks as part of the Books About Town art trail.

The trail features fifty benches shaped as open books and decorated by professional illustrators and local artists. The project provides an opportunity for the public to explore London’s literary connections, while enjoying art from some of the country’s top artists and celebrating the fun of reading, according to the project website.

Fiona Osborne of One Red Shoe painted the Dalloway bench. It features Clarissa on the front and Septimus Warren Smith on the back, and it is located on the Bloomsbury Trail.

“I painted the Mrs. Dalloway bench as well as the Railway Children. It was a privilege to illustrate and will hopefully raise a good amount for the Literacy Trust when they hold the auction in eight weeks time,” said Osborne in an email to Blogging Woolf. She also offered to share photos of her work on the bench as it progressed.

The project was launched July 2, and the benches will be auctioned on Oct. 7, with the proceeds going to the National Literacy Trust.

The Guardian is asking book lovers to be part of a poll to select the book that will be depicted on the fifty-first bench. It is also requesting reader submissions of book bench photos.

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