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Archive for the ‘art’ Category

If you won’t be able to take a seat on the Mrs. Dalloway bench in Gordon Square, this summer, you can still see it up close. Artist Fiona Osborne of One Red Shoe has generously shared photos of the bench at various stages of her artistic process.

If you look closely, you can even see her workspace in some of the photos, including drop cloth, paint pots and brushes, a blow dryer, and natural light streaming through a round window.

Osborne’s Mrs. Dalloway bench is one of  50 installed by the National Literacy Trust for its Books About Town art trail. Each is shaped as an open book and is decorated by a professional illustrator or local artist.

Side view of the Mrs. Dalloway bench

Side view of the Mrs. Dalloway bench

 

Front view featuring Clarissa Dalloway

Front view featuring Clarissa Dalloway

Front view in progress

Front view in progress

Close-up of back view featuring Septimus Warren Smith

Close-up of back view featuring Septimus Warren Smith

Back view in progress

Back view in progress

Detail of the orchid

Detail of the orchid

Detail of the swallow

Detail of the swallows

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Amanda Ann White creates collages, using paper clipped from old magazines. And sometimes the subject of her collages is Monk’s House.

Night and Day, Monk's House

Night and Day, Monk’s Househer collages is Monk’s House.

White emailed Blogging Woolf to share her collages of Virginia Woolf’s Sussex home, which are sold in the home’s new shop.

“The images of Monk’s House were the first things that went into the new shop incorporated into Monk’s House. In fact they were on sale before it was installed. They sell as cards and small prints there. Visitors to Monks House do seem to like them,” White wrote.

She also sells the collages at her Etsy shop. Larger high quality art prints are available on her website in the Giclee section.

White says she will offer new cards based on details from a long picture of the house and garden, which is a design for a bookmark, later in the year.

Collage is a not a new topic for Woolfians. The subject came up on the VWoolf Listserv in 2012.

Monk's House 1931

Monk’s House 1931

After the Waves: Virginia Woolf's Writing Lodge

After the Waves Virginia Woolf’s Writing Lodge

 

Monk's House Welcome Home

Monk’s House Welcome Home

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Anne Olivier Bell, editor of The Diary of Virginia Woolf, a 25-year labor of love, has been awarded an MBE in the New Year Honours 2014. She was cited “For services to Literature and the Arts.”

Bell, of Lewes, East Sussex, is also a trustee of the Charleston Trust. In August, an article in The Guardian celebrated her part in repatriating works of art following World War II.

The film The Monuments Men, as those who protected the greatest works of art and buildings were called, will be released Feb. 7. It stars George Clooney as George Stout and Cate Blanchett as Rose Valland, a member of the French resistance who tracked down thousands of stolen works of art.

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Here’s a preview of Lottie Cole’s “Bloomsbury Interiors” show on Nov. 19 at Cricket Fine Art, 2 Park Walk, SW10.

http://youtu.be/SHqWpCpmQ_4

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I found this via Twitter: A Virginia Woolf mural on a wall in Guadalajera, Mexico. Check it out for the vibrant colors as well as the symbolism. And don’t miss the electric meter at the far left.

woolf mural

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A couple of Woolf hunters have offered a recently discovered painting by Roger Fry for sale.

Scene

A newly discovered landscape by Roger Fry (circa 1913-1919) is now being offered for sale by Jon S. Richardson Rare Books.

Known as “Scene,” this untitled impressionist rendering of a farmhouse alongside a river was discovered to be a work of Fry when the painting was cleaned and repaired by a professional art restoration firm, according to an email the seller, Jon S Richardson Rare Books of Concord, Mass., sent Blogging Woolf.

About the Fry painting

The oil on canvas measures 20 inches by 24 inches, is circa 1913 to 1919 and has an original label from the Omega Workshops, 33 Fitzroy Square, on its reverse side. Dominant colors, which are mainly subdued, are green with brown-orange and blue-grey clouds. Fry’s signature appears in the lower left corner.

Research done by Richardson Rare Books includes the following facts to help date and locate the painting:

  • in 1916 Roger Fry was writing Vanessa Bell that he had returned to landscapes free of “the impressionism you infected me with.” (RF Letters #381- Spalding, Roger Fry .., p. 186)
  • In May, 1916, Fry was at Bo Peep Farm in Alciston (now a B&B near Berwick) painting landscapes (RF Letters #378), evidence that the painting is a Sussex scene and quite possibly a farmstead along the Cuckmere River.

About the painting’s history

The painting’s acquisition by the rare books company led it “to the informed speculation that the painting was one sold in New York City by Sunwise Turn, the Manhattan bookshop which dealt in Omega goods,” according to Richardson.

“While originally Sunwise was thought to deal in textiles only, from a photograph we handled several years ago advertising an Omega screen, it is clear they dealt in other Omega goods as well; any purchaser from Sunwise would have encountered the 1929 stock market crash followed by the Great Depression which no doubt caused the painting to be dispersed into the used goods market and lost in obscurity,” Richardson wrote.

“The signature, even on cleaning, is only visible with sharp light tightly focused, thus it does not show in a photograph with general flash nor upon routine visible inspection. Only upon cleaning did the signature achieve any visibility. Any Roger Fry oil painting from the Omega Period is rare and, with the Omega provenance, this is perhaps unique.”

About the Woolf hunters

According to “Woolf Hunters,” a 2010 article in the Harvard Magazine, Richardson founders Jon and harbor books screenshotMargaret Richardson have made hunting down the works of Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group their mission since opening York Harbor Books in Maine more than 20 years ago.

Their focus has been successful, Jon Richardson explains in the article, “because Woolf and her companions are `still taught, still collected, and many of the people who study the group end up as collectors.’” So successful that the shop publishes a major printed catalog each summer.

To contact Jon S. Richardson Rare Books, email Yorkharborbooks@aol.com.

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My friend and neighbor, San Diego and Santa Fe artist Kirby Kendrick, created her blog to inform and educate her readers about art and artists–the big picture. She posts about art history, art’s role in society, and the interplay of all the creative arts, including music and literature.

Virginia Woolf by Roger Fry (1912)

Virginia Woolf by Roger Fry (1912)

Knowing about my Woolfmania and about Virginia Woolf’s connections to the arts, Kirby asked me to write a couple of guest posts about Woolf and her milieu. The first one, “Virginia Woolf: Who’s Afraid of Art?,” is linked here.

While you’re there, you may want to look over Kirby’s site–check out KA-POW!, her graffiti-inspired installation–and subscribe to her bi-weekly blog posts. You never know what you might find–she’s written about ballet and basketball, the art of the telephone, understanding cubism, and more.

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