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Archive for the ‘art’ Category

Anne Olivier Bell, editor of The Diary of Virginia Woolf, a 25-year labor of love, has been awarded an MBE in the New Year Honours 2014. She was cited “For services to Literature and the Arts.”

Bell, of Lewes, East Sussex, is also a trustee of the Charleston Trust. In August, an article in The Guardian celebrated her part in repatriating works of art following World War II.

The film The Monuments Men, as those who protected the greatest works of art and buildings were called, will be released Feb. 7. It stars George Clooney as George Stout and Cate Blanchett as Rose Valland, a member of the French resistance who tracked down thousands of stolen works of art.

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Here’s a preview of Lottie Cole’s “Bloomsbury Interiors” show on Nov. 19 at Cricket Fine Art, 2 Park Walk, SW10.

http://youtu.be/SHqWpCpmQ_4

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I found this via Twitter: A Virginia Woolf mural on a wall in Guadalajera, Mexico. Check it out for the vibrant colors as well as the symbolism. And don’t miss the electric meter at the far left.

woolf mural

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A couple of Woolf hunters have offered a recently discovered painting by Roger Fry for sale.

Scene

A newly discovered landscape by Roger Fry (circa 1913-1919) is now being offered for sale by Jon S. Richardson Rare Books.

Known as “Scene,” this untitled impressionist rendering of a farmhouse alongside a river was discovered to be a work of Fry when the painting was cleaned and repaired by a professional art restoration firm, according to an email the seller, Jon S Richardson Rare Books of Concord, Mass., sent Blogging Woolf.

About the Fry painting

The oil on canvas measures 20 inches by 24 inches, is circa 1913 to 1919 and has an original label from the Omega Workshops, 33 Fitzroy Square, on its reverse side. Dominant colors, which are mainly subdued, are green with brown-orange and blue-grey clouds. Fry’s signature appears in the lower left corner.

Research done by Richardson Rare Books includes the following facts to help date and locate the painting:

  • in 1916 Roger Fry was writing Vanessa Bell that he had returned to landscapes free of “the impressionism you infected me with.” (RF Letters #381- Spalding, Roger Fry .., p. 186)
  • In May, 1916, Fry was at Bo Peep Farm in Alciston (now a B&B near Berwick) painting landscapes (RF Letters #378), evidence that the painting is a Sussex scene and quite possibly a farmstead along the Cuckmere River.

About the painting’s history

The painting’s acquisition by the rare books company led it “to the informed speculation that the painting was one sold in New York City by Sunwise Turn, the Manhattan bookshop which dealt in Omega goods,” according to Richardson.

“While originally Sunwise was thought to deal in textiles only, from a photograph we handled several years ago advertising an Omega screen, it is clear they dealt in other Omega goods as well; any purchaser from Sunwise would have encountered the 1929 stock market crash followed by the Great Depression which no doubt caused the painting to be dispersed into the used goods market and lost in obscurity,” Richardson wrote.

“The signature, even on cleaning, is only visible with sharp light tightly focused, thus it does not show in a photograph with general flash nor upon routine visible inspection. Only upon cleaning did the signature achieve any visibility. Any Roger Fry oil painting from the Omega Period is rare and, with the Omega provenance, this is perhaps unique.”

About the Woolf hunters

According to “Woolf Hunters,” a 2010 article in the Harvard Magazine, Richardson founders Jon and harbor books screenshotMargaret Richardson have made hunting down the works of Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group their mission since opening York Harbor Books in Maine more than 20 years ago.

Their focus has been successful, Jon Richardson explains in the article, “because Woolf and her companions are `still taught, still collected, and many of the people who study the group end up as collectors.’” So successful that the shop publishes a major printed catalog each summer.

To contact Jon S. Richardson Rare Books, email Yorkharborbooks@aol.com.

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My friend and neighbor, San Diego and Santa Fe artist Kirby Kendrick, created her blog to inform and educate her readers about art and artists–the big picture. She posts about art history, art’s role in society, and the interplay of all the creative arts, including music and literature.

Virginia Woolf by Roger Fry (1912)

Virginia Woolf by Roger Fry (1912)

Knowing about my Woolfmania and about Virginia Woolf’s connections to the arts, Kirby asked me to write a couple of guest posts about Woolf and her milieu. The first one, “Virginia Woolf: Who’s Afraid of Art?,” is linked here.

While you’re there, you may want to look over Kirby’s site–check out KA-POW!, her graffiti-inspired installation–and subscribe to her bi-weekly blog posts. You never know what you might find–she’s written about ballet and basketball, the art of the telephone, understanding cubism, and more.

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Wearing Woolf on your neck

woolf pendant

Always on the lookout for all things Woolfian, I found this pendant at the Made in Ohio Craft Festival at Hale Farm in Bath last weekend.

The image of Woolf is affixed to a domino and sealed with a glossy substance. It is from a Roger Fry painting of Woolf, circa 1917.

Of course, this Woolf necklace is not the only one out there. A quick Google search turns up quite a few for sale on ebay, etsy, etc. Some feature Woolf’s face, others her words.

There’s also a Bloomsbury necklace with portraits of key members of the group. And a Woolf Whistle necklace. Not sure about that one.

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Four Woolf sightings here.

First, I found this clever three-panel book review of A Room of One’s Own. It’s on the “Classics” tab of the Three Panel Book Review blog whose mission is to “review books in comic strip format.”

Screen Shot 2013-07-15 at 11.26.08 PMSecond, Alice Lowe sent along a note about the June 30 NY Times Book Review, which included a review by Hannah Tennant-Moore of Orkney by Amy Sackville:

As in Nightwood, by Djuna Barnes, and The Waves, by Virginia Woolf, the prose in Orkney is so compelling one does not read to find out what happens, but to find out how it will be described.

Third, you can have a “Chat With Virginia Woolf’s Ghost,” a story in Boston’s Metro that publicizes a Screen Shot 2013-07-15 at 11.56.11 PMJune fundraising event at Brookline Booksmith featuring local comedians who assume the identities of departed legends of the printed word.”

In the piece, comedienne Jenny Zigrino summons Woolf’s ghost to talk about the event, as well as her feelings about television (she is frantic to watch the final episode of The Office), technology (she bemoans the fact that heaven only has DSL) and who should play her (Scarlett Johansson) and her husband (Vin Disel) in a biographical film.

Fourth, take a look at “Cheese Reads: 10 Amazing Cheeses and Their Literary Counterparts.” In it, Woolf is paired with a Bayley Hazen Blue. The Stitlon-like blue is described as “a mix of narratives – the Mrs. Dalloway of cheeses, if you will…a cheese that will permeate your memory for years.”Virginia Hazen Blue

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graphiccanon3Russ Kick is back with volume three of his compendium of literary art and comics.  The Graphic Canon, Vol. 3: From Heart of Darkness to Hemingway to Infinite Jest is out — and it includes Virginia Woolf in its 560 pages.

The 2012 volume was named as one of the year’s best graphic novels and graphic nonfiction. Now volume three offers 84 contributing artists’ perspectives on classics published after 1899. Authors include Woolf, Jack Kerouac, James Joyce, Edna St. Vincent Millay, James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway and T. S. Eliot.

Below are two illustrations by Caroline Picard of Woolf’s The Voyage Out.

graphiccanon_woolf

graphiccanon_woolf2

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If you are interested in Virginia Woolf and art, a 46-minute introductory talk on “Women Writers and the Avant-Garde: Virginia Woolf and Painting” is a real find.

Dr. Manuela Palacios González

Dr. Manuela Palacios González

Dr. Manuela Palacios González, professor of English Literature at the University of Santiago at Compostela, is the lecturer.

Thanks to Manuela Palacios Gonzalez for the link.

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Blogging Woolf is back from a holiday hiatus made longer by a bout with On Being Ill — the virus, not the Virginia Woolf essay published in 1930  by the Hogarth Press. But now that we are back, we recommend a couple of essays for your edification in this new year.

armoury-show-posterThe first, “1913–What year…” by Kathleen Dixon Donnelly on the SuchFriends blog, takes an in-depth look at the New York Armory Show in February 1913, connecting it to Bloomsbury Group painters Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Roger Fry, etc. who closed London’s Second Post-Impressionist Exhibit early so many of the paintings could be sent on to New York.

Donnelly promises to post updates all year on what was happening to writers in 1913. You can also check out the Such Friends page on Facebook.

The second is Blogging Woolf contributor Alice Lowe‘s latest published work, “On the Road Again,” which appears in the current issue of The Feathered Flounder.

Lowe notes that “being the mother of a daughter and the daughter of a mother is a rich source of feathered flounderreflection.” In this latest poignant essay, she draws on those dual experiences, as well as “from those other gems, memory and aging” to wonder whether she has encountered the beginning of her dotage.

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