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Archive for the ‘call for papers’ Category

Katherine Mansfield SocietyKatherine Mansfield and the Blooms Berries, an international conference organized by the Katherine Mansfield Society that will be held at the Newberry Library in Chicago, Ill., May 28-30, 2015, has issued a call for papers.

Submit abstracts of 250 words plus a bio-sketch of 50 words to conference organizers, Todd Martin, Erika Baldt, and Alex Moffett. Email to: kmsintheus@gmail.com. Complete panel proposals of three speakers plus a chair, are welcome.

Deadline for abstracts: Oct. 30, 2014.

Get the full details.

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Dr. Ann Martin of the University of Saskatchewan and editor of the fall 2015 issue of the Virginia Woolfvwm Miscellany has issued a call for papers on the theme “Virginia Woolf in the Modern Machine Age.”

The topic is a natural for her, as she has presented papers and published essays on the topic of Woolf’s complicated relationship with the motor car. I was charmed by her paper, “The Lanchester’s Fluid Fly Wheel: Virginia Woolf and British Car Culture,” which she presented at the 23rd Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf.

Call for paper details

The Virginia Woolf Miscellany invites submissions of papers that address the role of everyday machines in the life and/or works of Virginia Woolf. From typewriters and telephones to gramophones and the wireless; from motor-cars and combat aeroplanes to trains and department store elevators; from cameras and film projectors to ranges and hot water tanks, the commonplace technologies of the modern machineage leave their trace on Bloomsbury.

To what extent are these and other machines represented, hidden, implied, avoided, embraced, or questioned by Woolf and her circle and characters? What is the place of labour and mass production, or the role of the handmade or bespoke object, in the context of such technologies and the desires with which they are implicated? What are the ramifications for the individual’s everyday navigation of modernity, domesticity, and/or community? Alternatively, what is the influence of everyday technologies in our own interactions with Woolf and her writings?

Please submit papers of no more than 2500 words to Ann Martin at ann.martin@usask.ca by 31 March 2015.

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The literature of the 1930s is commonly characterized as anti-modernist because of the prevalence of VWM Queering Woolfdocumentary realism, political purpose, and autobiographically-inflected fiction. Moreover, the canonical literature of the decade is almost entirely authored by privileged young men, a phenomenon explored by Virginia Woolf in “The Leaning Tower.”

Interestingly, however, the 1930s bears witness to Woolf’s most daring and most commercially successful novels, The Waves and  The Years respectively.

With this context in mind: how does the “modernist” and “feminist” Woolf align with the common understanding of the decade’s literary figures and their production? And, by extension, does and if
so, how  Woolf’s 1930s writing sheds new light on a decade of literature otherwise dominated by the Auden and Brideshead Generations?

This issue of Virginia Woolf Miscellany, which will be published in Spring 2015, seeks contributions that explore Woolf’s relationship to the canonical literature of the 1930s, such as but not limited to:

Auden’s poetry, Isherwood’s Berlin fiction, Auden’s and Isherwood’s plays, Spender’s commentary, and Waugh’s comedic novels. Equally, this issue also seeks contributions examining resonances among Woolf’s 1930s writing and non-canonical literature of the decade, especially literature written by women.

In addition, this issue encourages responses to the following questions:

  • How does Woolf scholarship, if at all, engage with the critical study of 1930s literature?
  • How does Woolf?s modernism disrupt or complement the critical understanding of 1930s literature?
  • What can Woolf?s late fiction and essays reveal about the 1930s and its literature that the traditional scholarly narrative conceals or overlooks?

Send submissions of no more than 2500 words to: Erica Gene Delsandro ericadelsandro@gmail.com

Deadline for submission: Extended to Sept. 1, 2014

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The International Virginia Woolf Society is pleased to host its fifteenth consecutive panel at theLouisville Conference artwork University of Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, scheduled for Feb. 26-28, 2015.

We invite proposals for critical papers on any topic concerning Woolf studies. A particular panel theme may be chosen depending on the proposals received.

Please submit by email a cover page with your name, email address, mailing address, phone number, professional affiliation (if any), and the title of your paper, and a second anonymous page containing a 250-word paper proposal to Kristin Czarnecki (kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu) (one submission per person, please, devoid of any information that might identify the submitter) by Monday, Sept. 22, 2014.

Panel Selection Committee:

Jeanne Dubino
Mark Hussey
Jane Lilienfeld
Vara Neverow

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The Modernist Studies Association 2014 Conference: Confluence & Division, Nov. 6-9, at the Omni William Screen Shot 2014-03-25 at 12.46.13 PMPenn Hotel in Pittsburgh has issued a call for papers that examine women writers in the 1930s: their relationship with modernism as well as the impact of increased political power and continued social inequality. Papers examining race, class, and/or sexuality in a transatlantic context are encouraged.
Erica Delsandro, who is coordinating the paper submissions, shared the news with the VWoolf Listserv: “This is not a call for papers on Woolf’s 1930s work, per se, but since so many Woolfians explore other female writers of the period, I thought I would be remiss not to post this on the Woolf listserv.”
Abstracts of 250-500 words are being accepted until April 1. Email them to Lauren Rosenblum at lauren.rosenblum@gmail.com and Erica Delsandro at ericadelsandro@gmail.com.

 

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The 24th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, co-sponsored by Loyola University Chicago and Northern Illinois University, will take place in Chicago, Ill. in the U.S.A.,  June 5-8, 2014.

24th annual conference poster

Most conference activities will take will take place in Mundelein Center on Loyola University’s lakeshore campus.

Call for papers

Virginia Woolf: Writing the World” aims to address such themes as the creation of worlds through literary writing, Woolf’s reception as a world writer, world wars and the centenary of the First World War, and myriad other topics.

Conference organizers invite proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, and workshops on any aspect of the conference theme from literary and interdisciplinary scholars, creative and performing artists, common readers, advanced undergraduate and graduate students, and teachers of Woolf at all levels. Possible themes include but are not limited to:

  • Woolf as a world writer, including reception and/or influence of her work
  • Writing as world creation
  • Globalization of Woolf studies
  • Feminist re-envisionings of the world Lesbian, gay, and/or queer worlds Living worlds
  • Natural worlds
  • Cosmology, physics, different kinds of worlds Geography(y)(ies) and/or mapping the world “First” and “Third” worlds
  • Postcolonialism
  • The centenary of World War I
  • The World Wars
  • Peace, justice, war, and violence
  • Feminist writers of 1914 and/or suffragettes and WWI Pacifist and conscientious objector movements
  • Class and/in Woolf’s world(s) Writing the working class Socialists “righting” the world Expatriate worlds
  • artistic worlds
  • Inter-arts influences, including painting, cinema, music, and journalism
  • The publishing world
  • Transnational modernisms and postmodernisms
  • Woolf and/on international relations
  • Imperialism and anti-imperialism
  • Teaching Woolf in global contexts
  • Teaching Woolf outside of the traditional 4-year college classroom
  • Woolf and the new global media
  • Woolf and Chicago connections/reception

Download the Call for Papers as a PDF.

Submission Guidelines

For individual papers, send a 250-word proposal. For panels (three or four papers, please), send a proposed title for the panel and 250-word proposals for EACH paper. For roundtables and workshops, send a 250- to 500-word proposal and a brief biographical description of each participant.

Because organizers will be using a blind submission process, please do not include your name(s) on your proposal. Instead, in your covering e-mail, please include your name(s), institutional affiliation (if any), paper and/or session title(s), and contact information. If you would like to chair a panel instead of proposing a paper or panel, please let organizers know.

Deadline for proposals

January 25, 2014. Email proposals as a Word attachment to Woolf2014@niu.edu.

Get more information

For more information about the conference, including the keynote speakers, go to http://www.niu.edu/woolfwritingtheworld/.

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The International Virginia Woolf Society is pleased to host its fourteenth consecutive panel at theLouisville Conference artwork University of Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, scheduled for Feb. 20-22, 2014.

The group invites proposals for critical papers on any topic concerning Woolf studies. A particular panel theme may be chosen depending on the proposals received.

Please submit by email a cover page with your name, email address, mailing address, phone number, professional affiliation (if any), and the title of your paper, and a second anonymous page containing a 250-word paper proposal to Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu, by Friday, Sept. 13, 2013.

Panel Selection Committee:

  • Beth Rigel Daugherty
  • Jeanne Dubino
  • Mark Hussey
  • Jane Lilienfeld
  • Vara Neverow

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