Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Woolf sightings’ Category

Some Virginia Woolf tidbits on a sunny July day too fine to stay indoors blogging:

Read Full Post »

The National Literacy Trust book bench illustrating Mrs. Dalloway has been installed in Gordon Square, Mrs. Dalloway bench with mapBloomsbury for eight weeks as part of the Books About Town art trail.

The trail features fifty benches shaped as open books and decorated by professional illustrators and local artists. The project provides an opportunity for the public to explore London’s literary connections, while enjoying art from some of the country’s top artists and celebrating the fun of reading, according to the project website.

Fiona Osborne of One Red Shoe painted the Dalloway bench. It features Clarissa on the front and Septimus Warren Smith on the back, and it is located on the Bloomsbury Trail.

“I painted the Mrs. Dalloway bench as well as the Railway Children. It was a privilege to illustrate and will hopefully raise a good amount for the Literacy Trust when they hold the auction in eight weeks time,” said Osborne in an email to Blogging Woolf. She also offered to share photos of her work on the bench as it progressed.

The project was launched July 2, and the benches will be auctioned on Oct. 7, with the proceeds going to the National Literacy Trust.

The Guardian is asking book lovers to be part of a poll to select the book that will be depicted on the fifty-first bench. It is also requesting reader submissions of book bench photos.

Read Full Post »

BBC Two announced the production of a three-part television drama set over a 40-year period about the Bloomsbury group called, Life In Squares, which will focus on the relationships between Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant.

The Bloomsbury Group From the BBC:
Life In Squares tells the story of the Bloomsbury group over 40 years, from the death of Queen Victoria to the Second World War, as they attempted to forge a life free from the constraints of the past. Their pursuit of freedom and beauty was always passionate, often impossible and ultimately devastating, yet their legacy is still felt today.”

The series was written by Amanda Coe and will be directed by Simon Kaijser. Production starts this summer.

Other performances of Woolf in the works:

Read Full Post »

Like other fans of Orange is the New Black, I was looking forward to the June 6 start of season two. Since returning from the Woolf Conference, I have only gotten through two episodes.

Meanwhile, others have done viewing marathons, staying up late into the night to watch all 14 episodes.

Marathon or not, have Orange is the New Black screenshotany of us noticed the titles of the books the female inmates are reading?

I know I haven’t, but I just read a post that provided just such a Woolf sighting.

It says the women are shown reading everything from Stephen King’s The Mist to Virginia Woolf’s Orlando.

Read Full Post »

Originally posted on My Pessimistic Lens:

30monster

View original

Read Full Post »

Once again, Virginia Woolf has influenced runway fashions, this time at London Fashion Week. Check out these links for references to Woolf, Charleston, Bloomsbury and fashion:Screen Shot 2014-02-22 at 10.08.39 AM

  • Handpainted Burberry fashions, a la Charleston Farmhouse. Read the New York Times story.
  • London Fashion Week autumn/winter 2014 blog: Days one, two and three in The Telegraph.
  • “The inspiration is Virginia Woolf — very poetic and super fragile as if the girl has never been out in the sun,” said the makeup artist in a Women’s Wear Daily story that also refers to the Woolf look as “a bit of a mad woman.”

Read fashion sightings from the past.

Read Full Post »

This collection of Woolf sightings includes a seasonal approach to Woolf (1) and mentions of World War I (10, 11).Orlando at American Conservatory Theater

  1. Appropriate for the season: How Five Literary Characters (including gloomy Orlando) Deal With Winter.
  2. Nora in The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud, works on a series of tiny dioramas, including one depicting Virginia Woolf putting rocks in her pockets at Rodmell. More on this sighting of Woolf in contemporary fiction.
  3. Jim Brock turned to Virginia Woolf for inspiration in writing his new play, “Because Beauty Must Be Broken Daily” in Florida.
  4. Tove Jansson compared to Virginia Woolf.
  5. Between the Lines,” a set of collages based on women in literature, including Virginia Woolf.
  6. Billilla, a grand old house in Brighton, is a place of one’s own to write fiction as part of the Bayside City Council’s Artist in Residence Program.
  7. Add the Internet as a necessity, along with a room and an income, for women who want to write.
  8. The influence of Middlemarch, which Woolf touted as “one of the few English novels for grown-up people.”
  9. Woolf, economic independence & empowerment in a modern context. Read more.
  10. Finally, a WWI anthology that is diverse — but includes no Woolf and no West.
  11. A high school academic decathlon focusing on WWI and including Woolf’ “Mark on the Wall.”
  12. Woolf an influence on John Hennessy.
  13. Almost an allusion to Virginia Woolf in Dylan’s “Desolation Row.”
  14. “Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors,” an exhibition at London’s Freud Museum featuring women’s eperiences, including Virginia Woolf’s.
  15. Does Mrs. Dalloway need a trauma trigger warning?
  16. Start Here, Volume 2 helps you read your way into 25 authors, including Virginia Woolf.
  17. A few more tales from the amazing life of Ruth Gruber.
  18. A Bryn Mawr swimmer visits sites abroad, including those of Woolf and the Bloomsbury group.
  19. Despite Virginia Woolf and Mary Shelly, sexism rampant among science fiction writers.

Read Full Post »

A carefully selected collection of relatively recent Woolf sightings from around the Web, starting with Vogue.

  • Vogue describes Felicity Jones as “massive fan of Virginia Woolf” who is part of “a Screen Shot 2014-02-09 at 3.57.09 PMnew cool British intelligentsia – the Bloomsbury Set relocated to twenty-first-century east London.”
  • Brazilian novelist Clarice Lispector: Looked like Dietrich, wrote like Virginia Woolf. Read more.
  • George Saunders says Virginia Woolf’s prose is more difficult to read than his own.
  • Susan Langford of Britain’s Magic Me needs “A Room of My Own, as Virginia Woolf put it” to achieve her goals.
  • A story on more women journalists covering cricket invokes Virginia Woolf.
  • Virginia Woolf’s questions about women, writing and gender discrimination are still relevant today.
  • Stylistic influence of Virginia Woolf present in stream-of-consciousness sections of Zadie Smith’s new book “The Embassy of Cambodia.”
  • “Finnegan’s Wake” performance compared to Virginia Woolf’s “The Docks of London.”
  • Leibowitz exhibit with Woolf photo in Illinois. Get details.
  • Virginia Woolf memorably described T. S. Eliot’s wife, Vivien, as like “a bag of ferrets” that Eliot was condemned to wear around his neck.
  • Anne Olivier Bell, editor of Virginia Woolf’s Diary, in this NPR broadcast about The Monuments Men.
  • Virginia Woolf on the shelves of Pratt’s Special Collections
  • Virginia Woolf meets Bridget Jones, Sherlock Holmes in literary London mashup.
  • Feminists edit women into Wikipedia.
  • Virginia Woolf and cricket: A connection. Read more.

Read Full Post »

The year 2014 has started off right, with writers citing Virginia Woolf heading into the new year.

The Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain marked the new year by quoting Woolf’s 1 January 1935 Diary entryVW Diary Vol. 5 on its Facebook page: “I must press a good deal of work in – remembering 53 – 54 – 55 are on me. And how excited I get over my ideas! And there’s people to see.”

A writer for Delaware’s Cape Gazette uses the following famous quote of Woolf’s in a story looking back on 2013 dining experiences: ““One cannot think well, love well or sleep well if one has not dined well.”

And a story in the Tampa Bay Times, “Five things you need to know before ‘Downton Abbey’ returns Sunday,” holds out hope that Woolf will appear in a cameo role during season four of the popular PBS soap opera. But we have heard that her appearance ended up on the cutting room floor.

 

Read Full Post »

Ever wonder what Lily Briscoe would smell like? No? Well, neither have I.literary scents

Yet I was still intrigued when I caught sight of a piece in the January/February 2014 issue of Intelligent Life magazine. In it, author Julie Myerson describes the scents that cling to Lily Briscoe, the artist in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, after she travels by train to the Hebrides. Think soap, violets, coffee, loneliness and linseed oil.

Lilly’s fragrance, “Skye Llly,” is one of six literary scents imagined by writers and created by the London perfumier Ormonde Jaynefor a charity auction to benefit the Shannon Trust, which works to help prisoners learn to read.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,641 other followers

%d bloggers like this: