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Posts Tagged ‘Hogarth Press’

The Legacy Libraries Project has recreated the personal library of Leonard and Virginia Woolf online.

The project recreates personal libraries held by writers, philosophers, politicians, etc. who have passed away. If possible, it includes a full catalogue of their books, including all bibliographic details to allow for easy searches and a quick book comparison between the members’ accounts.

Colm Guerin recently completed the Woolfs’ library based on the records held by the Washington Statelegacy library University and the Harry Ransom Center. Both facilities obtained their collections after Leonard’s death with the purchase of books from Trekkie Parsons and Cecil Woolf.

Each entry includes the details of any inscription, signature, or dedication made to or from the Woolfs, including the details for Sir Leslie Stephen’s books, which were obtained by Virginia after his death. Guerin said that to the best of his knowledge, it is now the most complete resource for searching the Woolfs’ substantial collection.

Guerin plans to make additions to the account, including a tagging system, reviews of publications written by Leonard and Virginia, and additional uploads of dust jackets published by the Hogarth Press.

A permanent link to this resource is included in the right sidebar. It is titled “Woolf Library” and is located  under the heading “Woolf Resources.”

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The International Virginia Woolf Society has issued a call for papers for the Modern Language Association Convention, mla2014-logowhich will be held in Chicago, Jan. 9-12, 2014.

Guaranteed panel at MLA

The society will have one guaranteed panel, Woolf, Wittgenstein, and Ordinary Language, which invites papers on Woolf’s championing of the ordinary in language and Wittgenstein’s philosophy of ordinary language, both thinkers’ tangential relationship to the “Apostles,” and/or their influence on Bloomsbury.

Organizers: Madelyn Detloff at detlofmm@miamioh.edu and Gaile Pohlhaus Jr. at pohlhag@miamioh.edu.

Deadline: 300-word abstracts are by March 8 to the organizers.

More information: For more information about the panel, please contact the organizers directly.

Proposed panel

The society will propose an additional panel to submit to the MLA Program Committee, which
must be accepted by the committee before it is official. Panel details are as follows:

Woolf and London’s Colonial Writers: Literary, political, social, and spatial connections between Woolf and London-affiliated writers from the British colonies. Papers may focus on any number of writers who traveled from various locals in the British Commonwealth and spent time in London contemporaneously with Woolf, including Mulk Raj Anand and Mahatma Gandhi of India and C.L.R. James, Una Marson, and Jean Rhys, from the West Indies. Papers might address intersections through the Hogarth Press, mutual friends and social circles, shared literary and political investments, literary responses, and common spaces.

Organizer: Elizabeth F. Evans at elizabeth.evans@nd.edu.

Deadline: 300-word abstracts are due by March 8 to the organizer.

Proposed collaborative panel

The society will also collaborate with another allied organization and submit a third panel, which is not guaranteed. For 2014, that will be a panel with allied organization, SHARP: The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing.

Organizers will choose papers for this panel and submit the proposal to the MLA Program Committee and hope for their approval.The topic is: Book History & Virginia Woolf: A joint session of the International Virginia Woolf Society and SHARP (Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing) on Woolf & book arts & history: letterpress, typesetting, bookbinding, manuscripts, the material book . . . her books in book history, and more.

Angles for this panel include Virginia Woolf, history, & the book arts. Woolf and letterpress, bookbinding, the book arts; depictions of the material book or the printing process in Woolf; or bibliographical or manuscript-based studies. Sly references to letterpress, type and typesetting, bookbinding and the Book Arts, glimpses in bookshop windows, descriptions of books on tables, with just a line of text to tease the reader, books wrapped in plain brown wrapper, manuscripts tucked in the bosom, books abound within the text of Woolf’s books. How do they work? Can they be identified? What do they mean? How do they shed light on Woolf as a book-maker/book-binder, a lover of the history and art of the book—in addition to her love of writing?

Organizers: Leslie K. Hankins at lhankins@cornellcollege.edu and Greg Barnhisel at barnhiselg@duq.edu

Deadline: 300-word abstracts are due March 8 to the organizers.

MLA Woolf Bash

The society’s annual MLA bash will be held at the home of Pamela Caughie.

Important note: You must be on the books as a member of MLA to organize or present on a panel.

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Blogging Woolf is back from a holiday hiatus made longer by a bout with On Being Ill — the virus, not the Virginia Woolf essay published in 1930  by the Hogarth Press. But now that we are back, we recommend a couple of essays for your edification in this new year.

armoury-show-posterThe first, “1913–What year…” by Kathleen Dixon Donnelly on the SuchFriends blog, takes an in-depth look at the New York Armory Show in February 1913, connecting it to Bloomsbury Group painters Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Roger Fry, etc. who closed London’s Second Post-Impressionist Exhibit early so many of the paintings could be sent on to New York.

Donnelly promises to post updates all year on what was happening to writers in 1913. You can also check out the Such Friends page on Facebook.

The second is Blogging Woolf contributor Alice Lowe‘s latest published work, “On the Road Again,” which appears in the current issue of The Feathered Flounder.

Lowe notes that “being the mother of a daughter and the daughter of a mother is a rich source of feathered flounderreflection.” In this latest poignant essay, she draws on those dual experiences, as well as “from those other gems, memory and aging” to wonder whether she has encountered the beginning of her dotage.

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Virginia and Leonard Woolf lived in Richmond, a suburb just 15 minutes from central London by train, from 1915 to 1924.

They occupied two houses during their years there. The first was rooms in number 17 on the east side of The Green, which is still considered “one of the most beautiful urban greens surviving anywhere in England.”

The second was Hogarth House on Paradise Road. According to Julia Briggs in Virginia Woolf an Inner Life, the Woolfs took the lease on the property on Virginia’s 33rd birthday. Hogarth House was part of the present Suffield House, which at that time was divided into two separate homes. The Woolfs occupied half of the Georgian brick home, moving there in early March of 1915.

One of England’s famous blue plaques, added in 1976, is affixed to the house to commemorate the Woolfs’ residency. The plaque is one of 15 in Richmond.

The Hogarth Press

The Hogarth Press began publishing at Hogarth House in July 1917. Woolf published Two Stories, Kew Gardens, Monday or Tuesday and Jacob’s Room between 1917 and 1924. Woolf could see Kew Gardens from the rear windows of Hogarth House.

When German air raids during World War I disturbed the sleep and the safety of the Woolfs and their servants, they moved to the basement at night. And when peace came, Woolf celebrated along with other Richmond residents. On July 20, 1919, she wrote her diary entry about the “peace” celebrations:

After sitting through the procession and the peace bells unmoved, I began after dinner to feel that if something was going on, perhaps one had better be in it…The doors of the public house at the corner were open and the room crowded; couples waltzing; songs being shouted, waveringly, as if one must be drunk to sing. A troop of little boys with lanterns were parading the Green, beating sticks. Not many shops went to the expense of electric light. A woman of the upper classes was supported dead drunk between two men partially drunk. We followed a moderate stream flowing up the Hill. 

Richmond makes its way into Woolf’s novels as well. In The Waves, for example, the reunion dinner at the end takes place at Hampton Court, which is located in Richmond. In the novel, Bernard calls it the  “meeting-place” for the group of six longtime friends.

Like most things in life, though, Woolf wavered between liking and disliking Richmond. Briggs says that even though Woolf described Hogarth House in one of her diaries as “a perfect house, if ever there was one,” by June of 1923 she was anxious to move back to London. In a diary entry that month, she wrote, “we must leave Richmond and set up in London.”

In March of 1924, the Woolfs left Richmond to move back to London. They set up housekeeping and publishing at 52 Tavistock Square.

To reach Hogarth House from London today, you can take the Underground District Line to Richmond or British Rail from Waterloo Station.

Read a modern-day paen to Richmond published in the April 18 issue of The Boston Globe.

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woolf exhibit catalogueBlithe Spirit and I have something in common. I share her self-described “abiding (nay, obsessive) interest in Virginia Woolf.”

Blithe is the creator of the blog Julia Hedge’s Laces, and this week she e-mailed Blogging Woolf to share her post about a recent visit to the Bruce Peel Special Collections Library at the University of Alberta.

While there, Blithe was awed by their exhibit of Hogarth Press books. She praises the exhibit itself, which is titled “Woolf’s Head Publishing: The Highlights and New Lights of the Hogarth Press” and is available until May 28. But she also praises the exhibit’s catalogue and recommends contacting the exhibit site to enquire about purchasing one.

You can read her interesting and detailed post, “An Exhibit of Woolf’s Own,” here.

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Everywhere I go, I hear it — that hacking cough that people just cannot seem to get rid of this fall.

So how fitting that this week, the Financial Times published a review of Virginia Woolf’s 1930 volume On Being Ill.

As the story goes, Woolf fainted at a party in 1925. During the aftermath, which involved several months of recuperation, she wrote a thoughtful rumination on how illness changes one’s experience of the world.

Those thoughts were published by the Hogarth Press in a slim volume with cover art designed by her sister, Vanessa Bell. It was titled On Being Ill.

The Financial Times review mentions a new edition of the volume, published by Paris Press and with an introduction by Hermione Lee. It is a facsimile of the original, cover art and all.

Five years ago, in 2003, Lee presented the keynote address at the 13th Annual International Virginia Woolf Conference on the essay. The theme that year was “Woolf in the Real World.” Nothing is more real than illness.

The Paris Press edition is not that new. My volume, which I picked up several years ago at my local Borders, has a copyright date of 2002.

Perhaps you can pick up a copy for an ill friend. It just might change his or her experience of the world.

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