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Posts Tagged ‘Jean Moorcroft Wilson’

Cecil Woolf Publishers’ new monographs usually come out in June to coincide with the Annual International Conference on 2012 monographsVirginia Woolf, but publication of the 2012 monographs was delayed. Now, the long-awaited list of new volumes in his two series, the Bloomsbury Heritage and The War Poets, is here.

Bloomsbury Heritage Series

  • Virginia Woolf and the Spanish Civil War: Texts, Contexts & Women’s Narratives by Lolly Ockerstrom
  • Walking in the Footsteps of Michel de Montaigne by Judith Allen
  • Virginia Woolf as a ‘Cubist Writer’ by Sarah Latham Phillips
  • How Should One Read a Marriage?: Private Writings, Public Readings, and Leonard and Virginia Woolf by Drew Patrick Shannon
  • The Best of Blogging Woolf, Five Years On by Paula Maggio
  • Virginia Woolf’s Likes and Dislikes, Collected and Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Paula Maggio

The War Poets Series

  • Isaac Rosenberg, War Poet as Painter by Jean Moorcroft Wilson
  • T.E. Hulme: ‘One of the War Poets’ by David Worthington
  • Apollinaire: Poet of War and Peace by Jacqueline Peltier
  • Alan Seeger: the American Rupert Brooke? by Phil Carradice
  • Soldier Songs of the Second World War, selected and edited with an Introduction and Notes by Roger Press

See a complete list of the monographs in both of these series.

All of the books published by Cecil Woolf Publishers are available directly from:

Cecil Woolf Publishing, 1 Mornington Place, London NW1 7RP, England, Tel: 020 7387 2394 (or +44 (0)20 7387 2394 from outside the UK). Prices range from £4.50 to £9.95. For more information, contact cecilwoolf@gmail.com.

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Emma WoolfIt’s the season of light. Of peace. Of joy. But in the face of Friday’s heartbreaking tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, an essay by Emma Woolf, daughter of Cecil Woolf and Jean Moorcroft Wilson, seems specially poignant.

Titled “An Apple a Day: A Special Anniversary,” the piece was published in The Times on Nov. 20. It tells the story of the goodbyes she has said to loved ones who have passed on. And it ends with a quote from Virginia Woolf: “Someone has to die in order that the rest of us should value life more.”

But before it ends, Emma shares this wisdom: “[L]ife is precious. Now more than ever is a time for new beginnings.”

Amen.

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Cecil Woolf Publishers, 1 Mornington Place London NW1 7RP, UK Tel: 020 7387 2394 or +44 (0)20 7387 2394 from outside the UK, cecilwoolf@gmail.com

Each year at the Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, Cecil Woolf Publishers introduce several new monographs in their Bloomsbury Heritage Series and distribute a new catalogue of their publications.

Here are the three new titles that debuted at the 21st Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held June 9-12 at the University of Glasgow, and the two that were reissued:

  • Virginia Woof and the Thirties Poets by Emily Kopley
  • How Vita Matters by Mary Ann Caws
  • `I’d Make It Penal’, the Rural Preservation Movement in Virginia Woolf’s “Between the Acts” by Mark Hussey
  • Virginia Woolf, Life and London: Bloomsbury and Beyond by Jean Moorcroft Wilson, a revised reissue available in both paperback and casebound editions
  • Virginia Woolf: A to Z  by Mark Hussey, a reissue available in both paperback and casebound editions

Download Cecil Woolf Publishers Bloomsbury Heritage Series 2011 Catalogue and Order Form.

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Marina Warner and Jane Goldman, conference organizer

Jean Moorcroft Wilson

Vara Neverow and Patrizia Muscogiuri, who provided Blogging Woolf with these photos. More are posted on Flickr. See the Flickr feed in the right sidebar.

At left, Gill Lowe in the pageant skit written by Suzanne Bellamy, pictured at right

Derek Ryan, who played William in the pageant skit, was also one of the conference organizers.
Catherine Hollis, Lois Gilmore and Barbara Lonnquist

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Cecil Woolf and Jean Moorcroft Wilson

Jean Moorcroft Wilson and Cecil Woolf are featured in an article about World War I poet Edward Thomas posted today on the Islington Tribune website.

Wilson, who is writing a biography of Thomas, spoke about him at an event at the Imperial War Museum on the eve of Remembrance Day. She is the author of biographies of World War I poets Isaac Rosenberg (2005) and Siegfried Sassoon (2009).

Churchill biographer Martin Wilson also spoke at the event, describing the conditions on the Western Front during the Great War.

Wilson serves as editor for many monographs in the Bloomsbury Heritage Series and the War Poets Series published by her husband, Cecil Woolf of Cecil Woolf Publishers, which is based in London.

She also wrote the text that every Woolfian consults when planning a trip to England in the hopes of following in Virginia Woolf’s footsteps. It’s titled Virginia Woolf, Life and London: A Biography of Place.

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I love getting post from abroad. Everything about it is charming: the feel of the envelope, the look of the stamps, even the fact that “U.S.A.” is included in the address.

I never rip it right open. I usually hold the letter in my hands for a minute, thinking about the long distance it has come, the water it has crossed, the person on the other end who has taken the time to sit down and put pen to paper.

Sometimes I have to wait for the right moment before I can open it. I never want to read a letter from abroad when I am agitated or in a hurry or distracted by some mundane matter.

But when the moment is right, I settle down on my favorite sofa, the one where the late afternoon sun slants across my shoulder. In that calm and quiet spot, I carefully slit open the envelope. I sip the words slowly, letting them swish around in my mind. I savor their flavor and their meaning. I note their nuances and subtleties. I picture the person who wrote it and the place where he wrote.

A letter, an old-fashioned handwritten letter from abroad, is something I can tuck in my book and read again later. It is something I can take with me wherever I go. It is something I can save forever, tied up with others like it, bound together and stored in a drawer.

So where is the Virginia Woolf connection in all of this? Well, we all know she wrote and received lots of letters — volumes in fact. Five of them sit on my bookshelf.

But two other things have made me think about letters. The first was a note I received from Cecil Woolf, nephew of Leonard and Virginia, who wrote to say that he and his wife Jean Moorcroft Wilson had spent 12 days in South Africa, where they spoke at the University of Capetown. Cecil’s talk was titled “As I Remember Them: Virginia and Leonard Woolf.” His missive was dated Jan. 26, and I thought about the significance of that date as well.

Cecil Woolf

The second thing that made me think about letters was the much-discussed news that Angelica Garnett has published a new volume of short stories, The Unspoken Truth: A Quartet of Bloomsbury Stories. These stories are not letters. But Garnett has been quoted as saying that the stories are autobiographical, not invented, for the most part.

Those things led me to ponder the similarities between real life and fiction and the differences between real life stories and the lives we share via letters. Both are edited, either formally or informally. Both alter the realities of our daily lives. Both stay true to those realities.

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cecilwoolfseriesIn a month and year when our country is giddily celebrating the historic election of Barack Obama as president, our friends across the pond have a different event on their minds.

They are getting ready to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice that ended World War I.

Of the five million British men and women who served in the war, only three are still alive. They are Henry Allingham, Harry Patch and William Stone, and they will lead the country in two minutes of silence on Nov. 11, in honor of those who have died in war.

The BBC has a special Web page and programs devoted to the 90th anniversary, along with information about artists and poets from WWI. And the Imperial War Museum in London is the site of a year-long exhibition to commemorate the anniversary.

The museum was also the site of the November 2005 launch of The War Poets series, edited by noted war poet writer Jean Moorcroft Wilson and published by Cecil Woolf Publishers of London.

That fall, just in time for Armistice Day, four volumes in the series were published. Another four came out the following November.

This year, Cecil Woolf Publishers has released several more. They include People’s Poetry of World War One by Phil Carradice, and Trench Songs of the First World War, selected and edited by John Press. These two soft cover volumes are the twelfth and thirteenth in the series.

Five of the volumes in the series are reviewed in the Camden New Journal. You can also read more about them on the Web site of the War Poets Association. Just search on Cecil Woolf.

Other titles in the series, which is billed as “The Lives, Works and Times of the 20th Century War Poets,” include:

  • Richard Aldington: The Selected War Poems
  • Richard Perceval Graves: Changing Perceptions: Poets of the Great War
  • Anne Powell: Alun Lewis: A Poet of Consequences
  • Alan Byford: Edmund Blunden and the Great War: Recollections of a Friendship
  • John Press: Sidney Keyes
  • Christopher Saunders: Edward Thomas: All Roads Lead to France
  • John Press: Charles Hamilton Sorley
  • Merryn Williams: T.P. Cameron Wilson
  • Dominic Hibberd: Harold Monro and Wilfrid Gibson: the Pioneers

For a full list of these and other books from Cecil Woolf Publishers, as well as details about how to order them, click here.

All of the monographs are available directly from Cecil Woolf Publishing, 1 Mornington Place, London NW1 7RP, UK, Tel: 020 7387 2394 (or +44 (0)20 7387 2394 from outside the UK). Prices range from £4.50 to £9.95. 

Cecil Woolf is also planning an addition to his Bloomsbury Heritage series on the topic of Virginia Woolf’s Likes and Dislikes, and anyone can contribute to the project. Search her letters and diaries for the things she liked and those she didn’t, then post them here.

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