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The luxury British fashion brand Burberry will soon launch a new collection inspired by Virginia Woolf’s novel, Orlando: A Biography. The ad campaign for the collection was shot by famed fashion photographer, Mario Testino, at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool.

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A photo from Burberry’s newest collection (photo by Mario Testino for Burberry from Burberryplc.com).

According to a press release at Burberryplc.com, the collection will launch on Sept. 19 during London Fashion Week 2016. The collection and the ad campaign will feature pieces and styles which give a nod to Woolf’s novel by “contrasting masculine and feminine styles across different periods in history.”

The campaign will celebrate the new collection as well as highlight the craftsmen who create Burberry products.

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An preview of the upcoming Burberry campaign (photo by Mario Testino for Burberry from Vogue.co.uk).

In the a press release at Burberryplc.com, the Chief Creative and Chief Executive Office of Burberry, Christopher Bailey, said this about the exhibition at London Fashion Week and about Woolf:

Just as Virginia Woolf’s Orlando is both a love-letter to the past and a work of profound modernity, this week-long exhibition aims to nod both to the design heritage that is so integral to Burberry’s identity, and to some of Britain’s most exciting creators, and the innovation and inspiration behind their work.

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The Burberry Woolf tote (from 2009).

This is not the first time Burberry has been inspired by Woolf. In 2009 Paula Maggio wrote about a Burberry collection and ad campaign which was influenced by Woolf. At the time, Burberry even offered a tote bag named after the author, which was available in several prints and styles.

Check out Vogue News for more information on Burberry’s Woolf inspired collection and about the upcoming London Fashion Week event.

If Virginia Woolf had a personal assistant, here’s the tale she might tell — according to comedian Gaby Dunn.

Literature Cambridge presents “Reading To the Lighthouse,” a study day on Stapleford poster Woolf 2016 jpg
Woolf’s much-loved novel of love, art, yearning, and loss, on Saturday, Sept. 17.

Cambridge academics Frances Spalding, Trudi Tate and Dame Gillian Beer will lecture on different aspects of the book. Each lecture will be followed by a discussion.

Cost: The cost is £90 for the day, which will run from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. At the end of the day, participants are welcome to stay on for drinks and informal discussion. You can book it online.

Location: The venue is the Stapleford Granary, an old granary transformed into a beautiful
lecture and concert hall, just outside Cambridge. It’s easy to reach by train
from London or Cambridge. Or come by bus or bike from Cambridge. Some
parking available.

Refreshments: Light refreshments will be provided; please bring a packed lunch

Stapleford Granary

Stapleford Granary

Tea at the Morton

Wandering around Bloomsbury on my first day in London this June, I happened upon the Morton Hotel.

I wasn’t exactly looking for it. But Ann Martin of the University of Saskatchewan had planted the name in my mind with an offhand comment at this year’s Woolf conference. Upon hearing that I would be alone in the capital city for a few days, she remarked, “You could have tea at the Morton.”

And so I did. I had written about tea at the Morton before — back in 2014 — but I had forgotten the details. Consequently, my afternoon relaxing in the hotel’s Library bar and lounge was full of a series of lovely surprises, all with a Bloomsbury touch.

I chose a seat in front of the fireplace, where I set in for a good read as well as refreshment. I relaxed with a selection of books about Bloomsbury laid out on a sofa table and the Morton’s traditional afternoon tea, which is truly lovely and reasonably priced at £15. It included a tiered dish of tiny crustless sandwiches, pastries and fresh fruit, along with scones served with jam and clotted cream.

All around me — from entry to ladies room — were photo collages of Bloomsbury figures as well as reproductions of art by the Bloomsbury group and Hogarth Press book covers designed by Vanessa Bell.

Next time you’re in London, take tea at the Morton. It’s open 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Monday through Sunday. Meanwhile, take a look at what you’ll find.

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Entry to the Morton Hotel, 2 Woburn Place, in Russell Square

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The chandelier in the entryway features Hogarth Press book covers.

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Once inside the entry, look to your left and “take the lift to the basement.”

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The cozy sitting area in front of the fireplace, my chosen spot.

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Books ranging from Bloomsbury Rooms to Bloomsbury Portraits are available for browsing.

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Traditional afternoon tea: as delicious as it looks.

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Collages of Bloomsbury photos decorate the walls.

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This sitting area nestled into a corner featured art by Vanessa Bell.

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Even the hallway to the ladies room — as well as the ladies itself — was decorated with Bloomsbury art.

Call for Papers for the Selected Papers from the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and Heritagewoolf conference 2016

Volume Editor: Jane de Gay with Tom Breckin and Anne Reus (Leeds Trinity University)

Series Editor: Wayne K. Chapman (Clemson University)

You are invited to submit your conference paper for consideration for the Selected Papers, which will be published by Clemson University Press/Liverpool University Press in time for the Woolf Conference of 2017.

Please submit your paper to Woolf2016@leedstrinity.ac.uk by Aug. 10, 2016.

Submissions should be 3,000-3,500 words, including Endnotes and Works Cited.

  • Please present your paper in the using the latest MLA Style Sheet and use the standard abbreviations for Woolf’s works, as established by the Woolf Studies Annual.
  • Please submit your paper in rich text format (preferred) or a Word docx file.
  • If using illustrations, please send them and captions as separate files and indicate in the body of your paper where the illustrations should be placed. (See over for technical details.) Authors must secure permissions for quotations or images.

The Selected Papers will feature twenty-five papers from the panel sessions, alongside some of the plenary talks. The selection of papers will be based on the following criteria:

    • recommendations by conference delegates
    • the currency/relevance of the paper beyond the conference
    • originality of contribution to Woolf Studies
    • engagement with relevant scholarship
    • the quality of writing and presentation.

Technical note on illustrations

Illustrations can be supplied as electronic files, of which TIFF files are best. Illustrations need to be at least 300dpi (dots per inch) at the size at which they are to be reproduced: i.e. a postage stamp image at 300 dpi is no good unless it is being reproduced at postage stamp size, as by the time it is blown up it will lose resolution. Images can be scaled down to fit, but not scaled up too much unless the resolution is very high.

Scans need to be gray scale or CMYK. If RGB scans are supplied we will convert them into CMYK for the printers, but the colour may alter a bit. So if the illustration needs to be accurate to an original photograph or painting, you must supply CMYK scans with the colour corrected to your satisfaction.

When submitting electronic files for your illustrations, please also submit a visual hard copy reference as well, clearly labelled with its figure number as well as a caption.

 

For the first time, a major exhibit will focus on the work of Vanessa Bell. It will be mounted at London’s Dulwich Picture Gallery and run from Feb. 8 to June 4, 2017.

Here’s a post from The Charleston Attic that spells out the role that Bloomsbury in the country plays in the exhibit:

‘Vanessa Bell 1876-1961’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery

“This week a team from Dulwich Picture Gallery visited Charleston for the day in order to photograph objects and interiors for the upcoming exhibition ‘Vanessa Bell 1876-1961’.”

Read the full post: ‘Vanessa Bell 1876-1961’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery | The Charleston Attic

Read here on the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew’s Library Art and Archives blog about the evolution of Virginia Woolf’s iconic short story Kew Gardens from its first edition with Vanessa Bell woodcut prints through the 1927 publication hand illustrated by Bell and on to RBG Kew’s new edition published in 2015 with contemporary illustrations by Livi Mills.

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1927 edition of Kew Gardens held in RBG, Kew’s LAA collection

 

 

 

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