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A new short video about Virginia Woolf was recently published on YouTube by TED-Ed. Titled “Why should you read Virginia Woolf?”  it is narrated by Iseult Gillesipe from the University of Wisconson-Madison.

The video details Woolf’s early life and highlights several of her novels. Check it out on YouTube or view it below.

 

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Alice Lowe, a contributor to Blogging Woolf and a prolific essay writer, has a new essay in Stonecoast Review. In it, she pays homage to her muse, Virginia Woolf, and reflects on her new tattoo, aging and writing.

You can read more about it on Alice’s blog: Seventy | Alice Lowe — still writing

 

The Bulletin of the New York Public Library dating from 1897 through 1977 is now online and includes the Virginia Woolf Issue, Issue 2, Winter 1977.

This issue features the Stephen family on the cover, along with multiple articles on The Years and essays that examine Three Guineas.

A special treat in the issue is Woolf’s hand-drawn genealogy of the Pargiter family that appears on the reverse of the Contents page, Page 155 in the PDF. Issue 2 begins on page 152 in the PDF numbering.

Thanks to Vara Neverow and the VWoolf Listserv for news of this online resource.

If you’re lucky enough to be in England this fall, you can attend two Woolf Talks scheduled by Literature Cambridge.

Speaker and Topic: Frances Spalding on “Virginia Woolf and Roger Fry: Looking at the Carpet from the Wrong Side”
When: Wednesday 18 October, at 1 p.m.
Where: Lucy Cavendish College, Lady Margaret Road, Cambridge CB3 0BU.
Free and open to the public. No need to make a reservation.

Speaker and Topic: Claire Davison on “Virginia Woolf and Musical Performance”
When: Wednesday 29 November at 1 p.m.
Where: Lucy Cavendish College, Lady Margaret Road, Cambridge CB3 0BU.
Free and open to the public. No need to make a reservation.

From the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain come several Woolf sightings. Read on for details.

Julia Jackson, as photographed by Julia Margaret Cameron

  • “Britain in Focus: A Photographic History,” BBC4 TV: Julia Margaret Cameron, Virginia Woolf’s great-aunt, is discussed at about 45 mins. Watch it.
  • “Virginia Woolf: ‘Madness’, War and Trauma,” a free talk, will be held Feb. 3, 2018, 2:15-3:30 p.m. at the Bethlem Museum of the Mind in Beckenham, Kent. Get details and reserve your free tickets.
  • A section on Garsington and D. H. Lawrence in “Andrew Marr’s The Making of Modern Britain,” episode 4. Watch it.

Ane Thon Knutsen with her hand-bound volume “A Printing Press of One’s Own,” introduced at this year’s Woolf conference in Reading, England.

Ane Thon Knutsen combined two loves with her project A Printing Press of One’s Own — her love of Virginia Woolf and her love of typesetting.

The two come together in her hand-set volume by the same name, which she debuted at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at the University of Reading in June.

It includes Ane’s personal, heartfelt essay about her experience finding a space of her own in which she could pursue her passion — typesetting. Her search occurred at a personally challenging time, soon after becoming a mother.

The intersection of the two — and the rescue role Woolf played in it — comprise her story. It includes her experiences conducting research at the British Library, which allowed her to handle the first volumes Virginia and Leonard printed on the Hogarth Press.

About that, she writes:

What contrasts! In some cases they have really tried to print appealing books, but in others they have not made the effort, or investment of time. Inkblots. Everything off-kilter. The complete disregard for the sanctity of the type area. Scraps of paper crookedly pasted on to cover up misspelled names. Damaged types which had not been replaced. These are not books considered worthy of dignified display alongside William Morris and Gutenberg’s bible. This smacked more of punk rock and anarchy. The books bear the marks of temper and a strong will. I was touched.

The essay also includes Ane’s ruminations on why Woolf did not write about the time she spent with the typecase. As Ane puts its,  “She, who could name the feelings, details and experiences we let slip by unmentioned, was perfectly qualified to describe the meditation of typesetting.”

Thoughts of her own

According to Ane, “The book is an essay referring to A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf. The essay reflects upon women’s role in letterpress, and the importance of a room of one’s own in artistic practices.

“In this book I am investigating the first books printed by Virginia Woolf at the Hogarth Press, both in practice and in the written ‘dialogue’ between Virginia Woolf and myself, as we are both self-taught typesetters.”

Two versions

The illustrations throughout both the English and Norwegian versions of the volume are linocuts by Ane’s artist sister, Ylve Thon. All text is hand set and printed together with linocuts on a proofing press.

The English version has a blue cover, is digitally printed, and contains handprinted linocuts and is hand-bound. Both are for sale, with the English version priced at £18. The handset Norwegian version is £75.

Ane’s volume is part of her artistic research project in graphic design at Oslo National Academy of the arts, where she works on a project investigating tactility in printed matter.

You can follow her on Instagram @anetutdelaflut.

“A Printing Press of One’s Own” by Ane Thon Knutsen – Photo courtesy of Ane Thon Knutsen

A look inside – Photo courtesy of Ane Thon Knutsen

Linocuts in the volume are by Ane’s sister, the artist Ylve Thon. – Photo courtesy of Ane Thon Knutsen

Ane’s books among some of her typesetting equipment. – Photo courtesy of Ane Thon Knutsen

Ane met Cecil Woolf at the conference, and he graciously signed a limited edition Hogarth Press centenary keepsake of Woolf’s “The Patron and the Crocus,” available from Whiteknights Press.

The Modernist Archives Publishing Project seeks submissions for biographical entries for the authors, artists and press workers of The Hogarth Press and for its publishing house descriptions pages.

MAPP is the first modernist DH project to focus exclusively on twentieth-century publishing houses.  It offers a pioneering digital platform to organize, interact with, and analyze book production, reception, and distribution networks and will represent a replicable digital model for contemporary and future scholars of modernist publishing and book culture. For more about MAPP, please visit its website.

MAPP would also be open to student work and to pedagogical uses of MAPP. Please contact their team to discuss possible pedagogical collaborations and student writing.

Submission Guidelines

Before submitting, please use the Google form below to send a brief query with your proposed biographical subject or publisher.

Biographies should be approximately 1,000 words and should be accompanied by a works cited and a bibliography.  Where possible please include links to the Modernist Journals Project, Orlando or other digital resources. Example entry: http://www.modernistarchives.com/person/ruth-manning-sanders

Press descriptions should be approximately 1,000 words and should be accompanied by a works cited and a bibliography.  Please see the MAPP site for examples at http://www.modernistarchives.com/business/the-hogarth-press or Lise Jaillant on Grant Richards at http://www.modernistarchives.com/business/grant-richards. Any twentieth-century press will be considered for inclusion. Foreign language and geographically dispersed presses encouraged.

Submissions will be subject to double peer review and will be credited.

Please send short proposals and queries using the following form: https://goo.gl/forms/1K33gDnxW8jHTNym1

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