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Viewing and reading Woolf online

Online art exhibit

Louisa Amelia Albani, whose pamphlet and companion exhibit on Virginia Woolf we featured in July, is currently holding an online art exhibition inspired by Woolf’s essay “Oxford Street Tide.” Take a look.

Online reading group

Starting Monday, Jan. 11, and running through Monday, April 12, 2021, Anne Fernald will lead a Zoom reading group dubbed “All Woolf” at the Center for Fiction, a Brooklyn-based nonprofit dedicated to fiction writing. The fee is $120 for four sessions, with an additional fee charged for books. Meetings begin at 6 p.m. EST.

Online view of The Bloomsbury Look

View “The Bloomsbury Look,” Saturday, Nov. 28, at 2 p.m. via a free virtual event with author Wendy Hitchmough as she speaks live from the Charleston studio to art historian Frances Spalding. The event will include the opportunity to submit questions live, and signed copies of The Bloomsbury Look are available to purchase through the Charleston online shop. However, the link to the event is not up right now, and unfortunately the book is out of stock.

More than thirteen years after starting Blogging Woolf, I realized that several important components were missing. First off, the blog was missing an “About” page, a rationale for how and why the blog came to be. So I have added one. I introduce it here.

It includes the story of how I came to Woolf — something most Woolfians enjoy sharing. It also includes how I first met Woolf in the classroom and how I came back to Woolf many years later.

Most important of all, I think, it also tells the tale of my friendship and publishing experiences with the beloved Cecil Woolf and his brilliant wife Jean Moorcroft Wilson.

This new page also encourages Woolf readers and scholars everywhere to join the Woolf circle by attending a Woolf conference or signing up for the Woolf Listserv.

Cecil Woolf and Jean Moorcroft Wilson

Mapping Woolf’s novels

Location is important in Virginia Woolf’s novels. And a page on the Londonist website maps the locations used in all ten of her novels. It also points out key factors about the locations.

Those points include:

  • Bloomsbury doesn’t figure all that frequently.
  • Piccadilly is her most-used location.
  • Only half of her novels are set principally in London.
  • Her novels are quite international in setting.

The map points reflect locations mentioned or visited in the following 10 books:

The Voyage Out (1915), Night and Day (1919), Jacob’s Room (1922), Mrs Dalloway (1925), To The Lighthouse (1927), Orlando: A Biography (1928), The Waves (1931), Flush: A Biography (1933), The Years (1937), Between The Acts (1941)

Duncan Grant drawings discovered

Four hundred and twenty-two erotic drawings by Duncan Grant dating from the 1940s and 1950s have been discovered under a bed, after being thought destroyed because of their explicit homosexual content, according to the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain.

The drawings were given to Edward Le Bas in 1959. They then were passed on through a string of friends before eventually reaching theatre designer
Norman Coates, who kept them under his bed and showed them only to a few select friends.

Coates has now decided to give the collection, thought to be worth £2 million, to the Charleston Trust. Read more on the BBC website and in The Guardian.

Charleston to launch crowdfunding campaign

Charleston, like most historic houses, is struggling financially because of the coronavirus pandemic.

On Oct. 16 it will launch a crowdfunding campaign to raise the remaining sum needed to reopen. That day is the 104th anniversary of the date when Grant, his boyfriend David “Bunny” Garnett, and Bell moved to Charleston.

Here are links to a few resources of interest to Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury aficianadoes:

  • On BBC Radio 4’s “Great Lives”: Listen to why James Graham is inspired by John Maynard Keynes, along with expert analysis by economist Linda Yueh.
  • In the LA Times: Read a quote from Woolf about writers’ neglect of food.
  • In Issue XXXVII of Piano Nobile’s InSight: Read about Virginia Woolf’s relationship with artist Mark Gertler.
  • A foundation named after Virginia Woolf: “In Woolf’s Words,” by the Hong-Kong-based company Woke Up Like This. WULT was recently heavily criticized for naming another shade in its “Face Daubs” line after Anne Frank. The company took it off the market.
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