Charleston tweets at 100

Charleston held a full weekend of Centenary celebrations Oct. 14-16 and is still booking special 80-minute Centenary Tours through Nov. 5. The tour begins in the rarely seen House Kitchen and journeys through 10 rooms focusing on the early years at Charleston, according to the National Trust property’s website.

Here are some #Charleston100 tweets shared by Bloomsbury in the country, the home of Vanessa Bell, Clive Bell, Duncan Grant and Bunny Garnett.

Sunday, Oct. 16, marks the centenary of the arrival at Charleston of Vanessa Bell, DuncanCharleston Grant and David ‘Bunny’ Garnett. In honor of that, the National Trust property has programs and activities planned for this weekend, as well as into the new year.

They include everything from “Your Country or Your Conscience,” a pacifist theater performance by White Feathers Theatre, to tours of usually unseen parts of the farmhouse ,to art workshops.

The cafe will even have a special menu inspired by the Charleston Garden and The Bloomsbury Cookbook.

Get more details and booking information.

Editor’s Note: This post is reblogged from The Charleston Attic

As Charleston looks forward to a weekend of Centenary celebrations, ‘The Attic’ is being specially prepared to open its doors for visitors this Sunday 16 October. Rarely on show to the public, the space, accessed by narrow, steep stairs at the top of the farmhouse was once Vanessa Bells’ studio and now stores Charleston’s extensive archive collection and works of art.  

My first blog post as Charleston’s ‘Attic intern’ showcases some of Duncan Grant’s book illustrations and book jacket designs from the 1960s. Newly catalogued from the Angelica Garnett Gift is a collection of Duncan Grant’s correspondence regarding his illustrations for a previously undiscovered short story by Virginia Woolf featuring ‘Nurse Lugton’ and a book jacket design for a novel by Margaret Lane called A smell of burning.  

Source: Book illustrations and jacket designs by Duncan Grant | The Charleston Attic

MLA 2018 and Virginia Woolf

Modern Language Association 2018, scheduled for Jan. 4-7 in New York City, will include Virginia top_mla_logoWoolf.

The International Virginia Woolf Society will have one guaranteed panel. The organization can also submit one additional panel, which is often accepted but not guaranteed. In addition, the group will collaborate with another allied organization and submit a third panel.

Submission guidelines

Members of the MLA and the IVWS are invited to submit one panel topic — not an individual paper proposal — for MLA 2018. The proposal should include the following:

  • A maximum 35-word description of the panel. The word count includes the title.
  • The name(s) and contact information of the proposed organizer(s).

Please submit your proposal via email to Christine Czarnecki, president of the IVWS at Kristin_Czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu. Use the subject line: Woolf MLA 2018.

Deadline for submission: Nov. 14, 2016.

Once the proposals are in, Czarnecki will send them out to the IVWS membership for a vote. If you wish to propose your own special session outside of the IVWS process, please visit the MLA website for more details.

A special Woolf gathering

Members interested in attending the traditional IVWS gathering at the MLA—a dinner to be held either Friday, Jan. 6, 2018, or Saturday, Jan. 7, 2018, should contact Czarnecki so she can consider that when making the booking.

After having an essay published last year in Spry Literary Journal, I was invited to contribute to abcsSpry’s ABC series. Writing for Beginners and Fiction Writing would be followed by the ABCs of Creative Nonfiction, and I could write on the letter of my choice.

I quickly claimed the letter “M” with its myriad manifestations–memoir, memory, motivation, and metaphor, to name just a few. And what about mentors and muses? I’d written a chapter, “A Muse of One’s Own,” for the 2014 book Writing after Retirement(yes, of course I spotlight Virginia Woolf!)–so I adapted it for this project.

Editor’s Note: You can finish reading this post on Alice’s blog: ABCs of Creative Nonfiction | Alice Lowe blogs … about writing & reading & Virginia Woolf

In June, Rohan Maitzen, senior editor at Open Letters Monthly, approached Blogging Woolf. She was seekingnadelwoolf someone to review a new biography of Virginia Woolf.

Zoe Wolstenholme, who joined Blogging Woolf as a contributing writer just this year, readily agreed to review the work by biographer and critic Ira Nadel. Titled Virginia Woolf, it is part of Reaktion Books’ “Critical Lives” series and is included in the University of Chicago Press catalog.

Wolstenholme’s review, “The bowl that one fills and fills,” was published online Oct. 1.

Open Letters Monthly is a monthly arts and literature review with a readership of more than 30,000. The online publication is linked to regularly by Arts & Letters Daily and 3 Quarks Daily, among other sites.

this is truly a Critical Life; the biography focuses on Woolf’s writing and its relationship with both her own and others’ critical thought – Zoe Wolstenholme, “The bowl that one fills and fills,” Open Letters Monthly, Oct. 1, 2016.

Other new tomes

Also included in the current University of Chicago Press Literature and Criticism Catalog are:literature_15_uchicagopress

Well no, but they do hang out together in a novel, along with Sylvia Plath, Paul Auster, Margaret Atwood, W.B. Yeats, and others. It’s Lexicon by Max Barry. “A cerebral thriller,” according to one blurb; “dark and twisted and sweet and humane all at once,” says another.

It starts with two guys grabbing a man named Wil in an airport bathroom and putting a needle in his eye to extract memories and lethal words. And they have to hurry or Wolf will get him first.

On page 46—at last!—one of the guys, Tom, explains that they’re called poets because they’re good with words. They’re quick and smart and persuasive, and when their raw potential is detected, they’re recruited from all over and sent to a special school to learn how to manipulate minds with secret words. Only the best will graduate and be given their names. Wolf is a poet, Wolf who turns out to be Woolf. “Virginia Woolf is trying to kill me?” asks Wil. “Among others. But Woolf is the one to worry about,” replies Tom, who turns out to be Eliot.

It takes a long time to separate the good guys from the bad, and then you got it wrong, or maybe not, and you’re still not sure. Did Woolf kill everyone in an Australian town? Which side is Tom on? Why is Charlotte driving a transport truck straight at them? Where does Wil fit in–he’s not Shakespeare, not a poet. And why am I reading this bizarre novel?

If I wondered to what lengths I’d go to chase down Woolf sightings in contemporary fiction, now I know. If I wondered to what lengths I’d go to make it up to Paula for not posting as often as I should on Blogging Woolf, now I know. The violence was off-putting, and I wasn’t sure I wanted to keep reading; then I was hooked. People being murdered at close range on one page, thought-provoking gems about the power of language on another. And Woolf.

That’s what I never figured out—why Woolf? All the rest are actual poets or at least, like Bronte and Atwood, have written poetry as well as prose. Max Barry has a Q&A feature on his website, and I asked him about this, but I haven’t gotten a response—I’ll let you know if I do.

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