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Archive for June, 2011

If you presented a paper at the 21st Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, you have until Aug. 10 to submit it for consideration for the book of conference proceedings.

Papers should be sent as an e-mail attachment to the two editors for the project, Derek James Ryan at d.ryan.1@research.gla.ac.uk and co-editor Stella Bolaki at stella.bolaki@glasgow.ac.uk. Papers should follow MLA style.

Eight themed volumes from past conferences, including conferences 15 through 20, can be ordered or downloaded via the Clemson University Digital Press website.

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Two weeks ago, we shared some of Patrizia Muscogiuri’s photos from the 21st Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf. Now we have more for you, thanks to conference organizer Derek James Ryan and photographer Graham Riach.

You can get to the links here or go straight to the photos, organized chronologically:

More conference coverage on Blogging Woolf:

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Ah, it’s that time of year. Time for the summer reading list.

I have a pile of British cozy mysteries waiting for me, as I find myself in need of a break from the heavy reading of the school term. Although I am hoping to feed my head with books such as To the River by Olivia Laing, Bomber County by Daniel Swift and The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War by Andrew Roberts.

Here are reading recommendations recently posted online. They include summer — and other — suggestions.

  • Read: The Best Books and Graphic Fiction for SummerPopMatters
    PopMatters writers offer up a selection of personal summer favorites that range from high-brow fare like William Faulkner and Virginia Woolf to mysteries from Agatha Christie and Craig Johnson. 
  • What are the top 100 non-fiction books of all time?USA Today
    Books you’ve probably read (or should read): Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, James Agee and Walker Evans’ Let Us Now Praise Famous MenVirginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own and Marshall McLuhan’s The Medium is the Massage. …
  • Totting up the 100 greatest non-fiction booksThe Guardian (blog)
    You’ll find Niccolò Machiavelli cheek by jowl with Patrick Leigh Fermor, Virginia Woolf next door to Karl Marx. There’s introspection and analysis from Michel de Montaigne and small-town horror from Truman Capote. René Descartes constructs God out of …
  • Good Men ReadQueerty
    Other popular selections included works by Marcel Proust, Jean Genet, and Virginia Woolf. Personally I was very happy to see some of my favorites like Edmund White’s A Boy’s Own Story and Alan Hollinghurst’s The Line of Beauty get their due.
  • Pick of the Paperbacks: June 12Telegraph.co.uk
     a Lancaster Bomber pilot whose plane disappeared over Holland in 1943 – starts out as a conventional memoir, but swiftly acquires a literary character, with Dylan Thomas, Virginia Woolf and others conscripted as witnesses to turbulent times. 
  • What Books Should a Soldier Take to War?New Republic
    Depending on the answers to these questions, the list varies, but it often includes the following: Virgil’s Aeneid, Montaigne’s Essays, Stefan Zweig’s Beware of Pity,Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, Evelyn Waugh’s Sword of Honour trilogy, …
  • Summer reading: The big listLos Angeles Times
    Also in Sunday’s pages, book critic David L. Ulin remembers his summer reading: Jack Kerouac, Albert Camus, Joan Didion and Kurt Vonnegut. And Jessica Gelt weighs in with a summer reading memory of her own: Virginia Woolf.
  • 10 of the best books set in LondonThe Guardian
    Mrs Dalloway lives in Westminster and Virginia Woolf brilliantly describes a day in her London life, stepping out on a glorious summer morning, Big Ben striking in the background. “For having lived in Westminster — how many years now? over twenty, …

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I sure wish I could be in Fort Collins, Colo., today for the day-long community reading of Virginia Woolf’s 1931 masterpiece The Waves.

Today is the first annual international Wavesday, which is modeled on Bloomsday, the event held in Dublin on June 16 each year to celebrate James Joyce’s novel Ulysses. Organizers differentiate the Woolf event by saying it will have “less early-morning boozing and more grammatical coherence.”

Wavesday begins at 9 a.m. and runs until evening. During that time, The Waves will be read in its entirety at nine locations, one for each section of the novel. The day will end with a potluck feast in the late evening.

A special thanks to Blogging Woolf reader Roberta Rubenstein for sharing this news. She was in Fort Collins on Sunday but wasn’t able to stay for Wavesday.

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About 11 days of Woolf sightings here. Scroll down to number 13 for an item that mentions the 21st Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf.

  1. Frank Duff challenged attitudes to unmarried mothersIrish Times
    VIRGINIA WOOLF observed that a painter could penetrate to the character of a person without the necessity of writing 300-400 pages. If I could paint, I asked myself, how would I paint Frank Duff? Of all the images which I retain of him, that which made 
  2. Fighting the Good Fight for ArtNew York Times
    “A woman,” Virginia Woolf wrote in 1928, “must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.” The latest on the arts, coverage of live events, critical reviews, multimedia extravaganzas and much more. …
  3. A Woman’s Tale Of Survival In The Surf Of Death And TaxesHuffington Post
    If I chose a few contemporary autobiographies of women to send back to the beloved 19th and 20th century suspects — Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf and George Eliot — Joynt’s book might make the cut. A literary masterpiece? 
  4. Ayn Rand Style Parentingdagblog (blog)
    Virginia Woolf was mentally ill and the Brontes died prematurely. My mother had me – a ‘delightful distraction’, but a calamity nevertheless. I found that a huge shock and very upsetting. According to the strident feminist ideology of the Seventies, 
  5. Fiction AddictionNew Zealand Herald
    Also Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, Don DeLillo’s The Body Artist, Murakami’s Sputnik Sweetheart, and any of the Paris Review interviews with writers. When I’m working on a novel I don’t read much fiction. I tend to read letters or journals of 
  6. The BBC missed out on some fishy tales in the Royal Ascot nosebagThe Guardian (blog)
    Also, DC – as I am sure he will not mind me calling him – is the grandson of Sir George Duckworth, a half-brother of the painter Vanessa Bell and writer 
    Virginia Woolf
    , who charged George with molesting her. There is one to throw in during a lull in . . . 
  7. Things My Father Taught MePatch.com
    That Christmas, he gave me a notebook inscribed with verses from Robert Burns, Emily Dickinson, and Virginia Woolf – each accompanied with his hand-painted illustrations. But I have always carried with me each lesson I learned on the water.
  8. Is it time to kill the liberal arts degree?Salon
    These were people who’d published dissertations on Freud, written definitive volumes on Virginia Woolf. The language of real-world career preparation was a language they simply didn’t speak. And if they did say anything at all, it was usually a 
  9. The Vorticists: Manifesto for a Modern World, Tate Britain, LondonThe Independent
    So awestruck had Virginia Woolf been by this that she wrote, “On or about December 1910 human character changed.” What she meant was British character. By 1910, Post-Impressionism would have been old hat in Paris, where Analytic Cubism was just kicking 
  10. NXNE Preview: Freedom or DeathblogTO (blog)
    Atmospherics seem important in many of the songs on this record, like the instrumental or sound bites in “Virginia Woolf” or the near-seven-minute silence in the acoustic version of “This Crowded Room”. What other art forms influence EGO? … Read Indie Woolf song debuts.
  11. To the River by Olivia Laing – reviewThe Guardian
    The Sussex Ouse draws Laing because it is the river by which Virginia Woolf lived and in which she drowned herself in 1941. The book’s project is to use the river to enter the stream of Woolf’s consciousness and to follow in her literary wake. 

  12. Escaping Hitler, Cracking Up in LANew York Times
    Juers went to England for a Ph.D. from the University of Essex — if I had to guess, I would say on Virginia Woolf. This would explain countless passages based on the lives, or quoted from the writings, of Woolf and her husband, Leonard. 
  13. Morris People in BusinessDailyrecord.com
    MARY THOMPSON attended and presented a paper at the 21st annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at the University of Glasgow’s School of Critical Studies. Musician and film director ROB ZOMBIE has directed at TV ad launching new 
  14. Lit Lawyers: The Fake-Memoir BusinessNew Yorker (blog)
    I’m reluctant to bring her into this swamp, but Virginia Woolf writes well about the slipperiness of personal history in the unpublished meta-memoir “A Sketch of the Past”: These then are some of my first memories. But of course as an account of my 
  15. Rocker’s artBBC News
    A number of pictures feature Monk’s House, the Sussex retreat of novelist Virginia Woolf. Captured with her vintage Polaroid camera, Smith’s photographs also commemorate the friends and family she draws inspiration from. 
  16. Margaret Atwood to be honoured by NUI GalwayIrish Times
     is the topic to be discussed by Susan Osborn, who edited Elizabeth Bowen: New Critical Perspectives, published by Cork University Press in 2009, and is working on a book about Bowen’s relationship with the Bloomsbury set of Virginia Woolf et al.
     
  17. Is it a novel, a TV series, or a “polyphonic narrative”? Buffalo News (blog)
    As Egan has made a point of saying, readers who credit her with “reinventing the novel” should take a serious second look at the truly radical narrative innovations of Cervantes, Sterne, Joyce, Gertrude Stein and Virginia Woolf
  18. BASED IN BERLINArtnet
    Swedish artist Kasja Dahlberg checked out all the copies she could find in Berlin libraries of Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own and collected all the notes that readers had written in the margins into a single copy, which is here reproduced …
  19. Chapter and verseHa’aretz
    In the 1920s, Virginia Woolf wrote articles in which she claimed that the world was going through profound changes and concluded that some literature is innovative and relevant, and provoking existential questions, while other literature is simply no 
  20. Album Review: Marissa Nadler – Marissa NadlerConsequence of Sound
    Nadler’s work has mainly surveyed struggle, sometimes her own, as on “Diamond Heart”, or others, like Virginia Woolf’s on “Virginia”, and her very unique voice is well-placed to search out the nooks of the shattered human spirit. …
  21. Kindle vs. books: The dead trees societyLos Angeles Times
    I’ve seen them in an over-the-shoulder sort of way — the sleek tablet design, the portraits of Mark Twain and Virginia Woolf that materialize on the screen like the work of a divinely inspired Etch A Sketch. Part of the reason I’m wary of picking one …
  22. One Minute With: Sarah Gristwood, historian & novelist, The Independent
    Virginia Woolf, for her combination of lushness and discipline, and bravery. It’s like watching a very skillful rider handling the reins of a difficult horse. Our 17th-century house has gone through many incarnations… from estate cottage to village …
  23. Bebe Neuwirth, Dianne Wiest, et al. Set for Classic Stage Company’s 2011-12 SeasonBroadway World
    The 2010-2011 Season also marked CSC’s first collaboration with nationally-acclaimed playwright Sarah Ruhl, with the New York premiere of her adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. 2011 also ushered in the first professional production of the recently …
  24. Restoration work needed to save Knole’s priceless treasuresKent News
    In Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, which is set at Knole, the home of the writer’s lover and friend Vita Sackville-West on whom the novel is partially based, the winds blow through the corridors. A total of £15 million needs to be raised for the work, …
  25. On the Desire to Be Well-Read: A Review of The Pleasures of Reading in an Age …The Millions
    But The Pleasures of Reading also features numerous casual allusions to serious, difficult authors ranging from Virginia Woolf toLeo Tolstoy to David Foster Wallace, and thus demonstrates a kind of cultural mastery that allows Jacobs to get away with …
  26. A Monthly Cycle Ladies Will Actually Welcome: Critical LassChicagoist
    Lady bikers of Chicago are finally getting–to heavily paraphrase Virginia Woolf–“a ride of one’s own” in the new women and trans-only monthly bike ride, Chicago Critical Lass. Taking a page from the worldwide gathering of bikes-cum-political …
  27. The Hackneyed Bollywood TrailBusinessworld
    In A Room Of One’s OwnVirginia Woolf memorably mentioned two prerequisites to being a writer-a room of one’s own (privacy and creative liberty) and money (financial freedom). One is not sure if Kanika Dhillon had either or both or …
  28. Tate Britain presents VorticismAMA (press release)
    The movement was created in reaction to Roger Fry’s Omega Workshops, a design enterprise that created visual representations of the ideas of theBloomsbury group, which included the author Virginia Woolf. Vorticism was rooted in Cubism, …
  29. The enlightened libraryHa’aretz
    “Secondhand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather,” Virginia Woolf once said. The library was opened in 2009, and has since revolutionized the park, formerly colonized by drug addicts, …
  30. Haentjens turns sure hand to anglophone ElleCBC.ca
    Since 1997, she has also been director of her own company Sibyllines, which presented a series of portraits of women writers such as Sylvia Plath (La Cloche de verre), Ingeborg Bachmann (Malina) and Virginia Woolf (Vivre).
  31. Touching BasedArtforum
    … 8 films and sharp color prints of recent sculptural works are gorgeous and moving, as are Keren Cytter’s Avalanche films; Kajsa Dahlberg’s Reclam-printed collation of hand-notated copies of Virginia Woolf’s 1929 A Room of One’s Own is excellent. …
  32. The decline of the pseudonymSalon
    Virginia Woolf, who never adopted a nom de plume herself, once expressed the fundamental and maddening condition of authorship: “Never to be yourself and yet always—that is the problem.” She was describing the predicament of the personal essayist, …
  33. The Closet Thinker: Hat tricksTelegraph.co.uk
    Finally, one cautionary tale: beware overly fashionable hats, or you may fall prey to the misery endured by Virginia Woolf. In her diary entry for 30 June 1926 she reported ‘black despair’ because her friends had laughed at her new hat, bought on the 
    Special thanks to Jane Stewart, who sent us this Woolf sighting after she returned home from the 21st Annual Internation Conference on Virginia Woolf.
  34. Thanks to the internet, we’re all literary omnivores nowThe Guardian
    Long gone are the days when the Common Reader of Virginia Woolf’s snooty label behaved like the koala and stuck to a diet of literary eucalyptus supplied by the literary-critical establishment. Today, not only do the goatish omnivores favour a varied …

  35. Shows – June 16 onwardsChesterChronicle.co.uk
    SALFORD: June 23 – Ad Infinitum presents The Big Smoke – Inspired by the lives and works of Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath, this poignant story is sung a cappella by one woman. It tells the story of a talented young Canadian artist who, …
  36. Theatre Ad Infinitum brings The Big SmokeManchester Confidential
    The show has been inspired by both the lives and works of Virginia Woolf, Sylvia Plath and American poet Anne Sexton. Sung a cappella throughout, the tragic story centres on a very talented young artist, Nathalie, and the collection of characters she 
  37. What’s Hot | “What There Is to Say We Have Said: The Correspondence of Eudora Louisville Courier-Journal
     which take us up to the 1990s into his old age, the pair discuss not only their work together and apart, but the orchids they loved, their day-to-day lives, and the writers they admired, from Virginia Woolf and Dylan Thomas to JD Salinger. 
  38. The Lingering Scent of a Woman’s InkNew Yorker (blog)
    Since I’ve never been able to read Virginia Woolf, and am sometimes willing to believe that it can conceivably be my fault, this verdict maybe taken fairly as the twisted tongue of a soured taste, at least by those readers who do not share with me the …
  39. Book Review: Wry and poignant story of lossCape Times (subscription)
    The members of the once-close family seem to all bob gently against each other but never to really connect – rather like the family group Virginia Woolf gathers at the Ramsays’ holiday home in the opening part of To the Lighthouse
  40. First Lady of Fleet Street by Eilat Negev & Yehuda Koren – reviewThe Guardian
    It was a heroic effort, but it knocked the stuffing out of her, and when he finally died she put up no resistance when the Sassoons and various “experts” (including a highly suspect doctor who was the model for Virginia Woolf’s evil Dr Savage) declared …
  41. Wendy houses for grown-ups! Men love their sheds – now it’s the ladies’ turn Daily Mail
    A treehouse similar to this costs from £28500, squirreldesign.co.uk THE READING ROOM – Inspired by Virginia Woolf’s own garden retreat, this charming room from the National Trust Garden Rooms Collection is the perfect place to escape with a novel. 
  42. VS Naipaul: Proud and prejudicialThe Express Tribune (blog)
    Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Sylvia Plath, , Maya Angelou, Emily Dickinson are women whose writings are among the best written in their times, and without who’s contributions a great chasm would be created in world …
  43. Who says women can’t write great works of art just like men?Sydney Morning Herald
    I’ve known a few distinguished women writers who think that the chap in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, who declares that women can’t paint, touches some dark place in a few male artistic breasts – but there aren’t many who are willing to trumpet S Mainstream Media Covers Weinergate, Ignores BilderbergGateOpEdNews
  44. “Nothing has really happened,” said Virginia Woolf, “until it has been recorded.” People who are indifferent and silent in the face of injustice and state criminality can’t change the course of history and bring tyrants down. We have to record the fact 
  45. The Millions Interview: Rebecca MakkaiThe Millions
    As a novelist, unless you’re Virginia Woolf, you have to find the midpoint between those two extremes if you’re going to maintain the reader’s interest over the long haul. In The Borrower, I have three different (unmarked) sections with different …
  46. RAINBOW AND GRANITECalcutta Telegraph
    In her essay, “The New Biography” (1927), Virginia Woolf, quoting Sir Sidney Lee’s remark that “the aim of biography is the truthful transmission of personality”, writes: “No such single sentence could more neatly split up into two parts the whole 
  47. The Girl in the Polka-Dot DressNew Statesman
    By Beryl Bainbridge One of the last letters Virginia Woolf wrote was toJohn Lehmann at the Hogarth Press in March 1941, withdrawing her just-finished novel from publication. It was, she explained, too silly and trivial and would require extensive …
  48. As Good as God, as Clever as the Devil by Rodney BoltThe Guardian
    It’s like the lists of objects that Virginia Woolf conjures in Orlando to summarise a whole Victorian way of life, though even Orlando (as far as we know) does not have the pleasure of owning a giant pincushion made for the queen. 
  49. ‘Ahead of Time’ proves apt description of journalist-advocate Ruth GruberSt. Louis Jewish Light
    Significantly, her dissertation was on Virginia Woolf, with “A Room of One’s Own” proving a key text. As a Jew studying in Germany as the Nazis rose to power, Gruber was acutely aware of the threat posed by Hitler – she even attended a Nazi rally to …
  50. ‘Oh darling, I just love being a housewife like Princess Kate’Belfast Telegraph
     role but as her 2000 bestseller and TV programmes showed, it was really the same job description. Good Housekeeping magazine arrived in Britain from America in 1922. Famous writers who have graced its pages include Virginia Woolf and Evelyn Waugh…

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Who’s Afraid of Vagina Wolf? Do I have your attention?

Well, director Anna Margarita Albelo is preparing to shoot a film by that title. The Cuban-American filmmaker says it was inspired by the classic 1966 film directed by Mike Nichols that starred Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Albelo describes the independent film as a semi-autobiographical darkly comedic examination of one woman’s midlife crisis, her nervous break down and her coming of age. Michael Urban, co-writer of Saved! wrote the script.

Albelo launched a fundraiser page yesterday via IndieGoGo aiming to raise $25,000 this summer in support of the film. Donors reap benefits, ranging from an official Vagina Wolf sticker to an exact replica of star Guinevere Turner’s face or breasts in latex. Donor categories include The Teen Wolf, The Young Adult Wolf and Welcome to the Wolf Pack. So far, donations total $260.

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Cecil Woolf Publishers, 1 Mornington Place London NW1 7RP, UK Tel: 020 7387 2394 or +44 (0)20 7387 2394 from outside the UK, cecilwoolf@gmail.com

Each year at the Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, Cecil Woolf Publishers introduce several new monographs in their Bloomsbury Heritage Series and distribute a new catalogue of their publications.

Here are the three new titles that debuted at the 21st Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held June 9-12 at the University of Glasgow, and the two that were reissued:

  • Virginia Woof and the Thirties Poets by Emily Kopley
  • How Vita Matters by Mary Ann Caws
  • `I’d Make It Penal’, the Rural Preservation Movement in Virginia Woolf’s “Between the Acts” by Mark Hussey
  • Virginia Woolf, Life and London: Bloomsbury and Beyond by Jean Moorcroft Wilson, a revised reissue available in both paperback and casebound editions
  • Virginia Woolf: A to Z  by Mark Hussey, a reissue available in both paperback and casebound editions

Download Cecil Woolf Publishers Bloomsbury Heritage Series 2011 Catalogue and Order Form.

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