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Archive for December 6th, 2012

In this week’s Woolf sightings, we have more on The Dalloway, the new “lesbian-leaning” restaurant opened by a simpatico model in New York City (1 and 2). We also have a link to the article “The Education of Virginia Woolf” that appears in the current issue of The Atlantic, which is rapidly being passed around Facebook (8).

  1. Out Model Kim Stolz Opens Lesbian-Leaning Restaurant in New YorkSheWiredThe Dalloway
    In true literary lesbian style, the bar and restaurant’s moniker is a send-up to the well-known titular character of bisexual author Virginia Woolf’s 1925 tome. As a self-described Woolf nerd, Stolz told New York Magazine that she resonates with the 
  2. 180 Minutes With Kim StolzNew York Magazine
    “She was never really able to be comfortable in her skin. Knowing the struggles that Virginia Woolf went through, it’s an ode to her and a thank-you to her,” Stolz says, taking stock of the now rollicking scene. “But Amanda will tell you she just 
  3. Victorian Bloomsbury, By Rosemary AshtonThe Independent9780300154474
    When Virginia Woolf and her sister Vanessa moved into 46 Gordon Square in 1904, in what Henry James had described as “dirty Bloomsbury”, the family was appalled at the young women’s choice of this profoundly unfashionable district of London, and 
  4. Browbeaten by a new cultural subspeciesSydney Morning Herald
    Neither highbrow intellectuals or lowbrow plebs, the middlebrow copped a pasting as far back as the 1940s from writer Virginia Woolf, who described them as ”of middlebred intelligence … in pursuit of no single object, neither art itself nor life 
  5. ‘Looking for Transwonderland,’ ‘Route 66 Still Kicks,’ and MoreNew York Times
    This season’s travel books abound with journeys inspired by literary lions — a trip to a Greek island in pursuit of the teachings of Epicurus, a hike along the river where Virginia Woolf died, an excursion to the birthplace of the Nigerian writer Ken 
  6. At Your Service: The Birth of Privates on ParadeThe Arts Desk
    It was in Singapore in 1947 that my real education began. For the first time I read Lawrence, Forster, Virginia Woolf, To the RiverMelville, Graham Greene and Bernard Shaw’s political works, becoming a lifelong Leftie. When Stanley Baxter explained Existentialism 
  7. The Education of Virginia WoolfThe Atlantic
    Born into the highest stratum of the English intellectual aristocracy, Virginia Woolf—whose set included some of the kingdom’s most illustrious families, many of its finest writers and painters, its greatest poet, its most brilliant economist—could 
  8. Free Classic Literature Newsletter! Sign UpAbout – News & Issues
    The Waves – Virginia Woolf The Waves is a novel (first published in 1931) by Virginia Woolf. The book is a narrative in Woolf’s infamous stream-of-consciousness style. Here, Woolf gives into experimentation, as the six friends are lulled–drawn with 
  9. Book News: Sasha And Malia’s Reads, Literary AlpinismNew Yorker (blog)
    At the Paris Review, Alex Siskin on Leslie Stephen, the father of Virginia Woolf and a mountaineer who made important contributions to the literature of alpinism. “A book is really like a lover. It arranges itself in your life in a way that is 
    Read 
    Climbing the Alps with Leslie Stephen.
  10. Video of the Day: Is the “Crazy Artist” Stereotype True?SF Weekly (blog)
    An ear here, a life there: Vincent van Gogh, Virginia Woolf, and Sylvia Plath each had their own way of dealing withMarbles mood disorders. In her new graphic novel, cartoonist and storyteller Ellen Forney asks an important question: For artists, are mental 

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