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Archive for February, 2013

Alice Lowe, a regular contributor to Blogging Woolf, blends her life stories, food and Virginia Woolf in her writing.leftovers on lettuce

Read her latest creation, “Leftovers on Lettuce: ABCs of a Life in Food,” an essay published Feb. 24 in Middlebrow Magazine.

Lowe describes the British journal as playing on “Woolf’s snooty but tongue-in-cheek essay in which she castigates ‘middlebrow’ as ‘the bloodless and pernicious pest who comes between’ the highbrow and the lowbrow, ‘the bane of all thinking and living.'”

Lowe writes that “the editors seek to reclaim it as a positive concept, calling Woolf’s own essays middlebrow, so I consider myself in good company on their pages.”

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As Kristen Czarnecki of Georgetown College noted in a message to the Virginia Woolf Listserv, the latest issue of the Journal of Modern Literature is “full jmlof Woolf.”

Here’s a sampling of what you’ll find — for free — as HTML or as downloadable PDFs:

The articles are published in Volume 36, Number 1, Fall 2012 by Indiana University Press.

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“Reflections West,” a weekly show on Montana Public Radio, pairs writer Danell Jones’ observations about living in the West with adanell-jones-book literary passage from Orlando. Listen to her musings at Year 3: Episode 68 via the Reflections West website.

Jones is a teacher, writer, scholar and editor who teaches creative writing and literature courses in Billings, Montana. She conducts writing workshops based on her book: The Virginia Woolf Writers’ Workshop: Seven Lessons to Inspire Great Writing.

Read more about Woolf and the West:

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Ever since the holidays, I have felt a disturbance in the Force, the Force of Virginia Woolf in the Universe. From mid-December until now, the number of Woolf sightings has diminished greatly. At times, they have even disappeared.

I don’t know what to make of this unusual development, but take heart. Woolf has broken new ground. This month, her novel To the Lighthouse has been credited with inspiring a video game (4). And I have heard talk that an Israeli Woolf has been sighted (13).

  1. Showing her funny side: British Library to release Virginia Woolf’s last The Independent
    The British Library is to show the mischievous and comic side to Virginia Woolf, with the release of her last unpublished work later this year. The 90-year old writings dubbed The Charleston Bulletin Supplements will be published for the first time in 
  2. Virginia Woolf’s fun side revealedThe Guardian
    An affectionate, mischievous side to Virginia Woolf is set to be revealed in the author’s last unpublished work, a series of 90-year-old family vignettes that will be released for the first time this summer. The Charleston Bulletin was a family 
  3. Virginia Woolf and other great literary cooksThe Guardian (blog)
    When the US food-and-lit blog Paper and Salt (paperandsalt.org) last week published a recipe for a cottage loaf as Virginia Woolf might have cooked it, other sites linked to it eagerly, suggesting America is at least as baking-mad as we are. Even more 
  4. How Virginia Woolf inspired Far Cry 3Shacknewsvideo game
    What was the reasoning behind making such a compelling character leave the narrative so early? Lead writer Jeffrey Yohalem explained that Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse inspired that decision. In Woolf’s novel, “the main character dies in the 
  5. Watch Patti Smith Read From Virginia Woolf, And Hear The Only Surviving Huffington Post
    In the video above, poet, artist, National Book Award winner, and “godmother of punk” Patti Smith reads a selection from Virginia Woolf’s 1931 experimental novel The Waves, accompanied on piano and guitar by her daughter Jesse and son Jackson.
  6. Was the first world war accompanied by a rising literary nationalism?The Guardian (blog)
    In one of the talks this weekend, Rachel Bowlby will discuss Virginia Woolf’s justly famous essay from 1923 (pdf), “Mr Bennett and Mrs Brown”, and take on her teasing contention that “on or about December 1910, human character changed”. I can’t imagine Read more about The Rest is Noise event at Southbank Centre, London, on Feb. 2 that included Woolf.
  7. Book News: Alice’s Appeal, Virginia’s Pastime, New Yorker (blog)awritersdiary_woolf-1
    Virginia Woolf
     on the virtues of keeping a diary. Data analysis of literary works reveals Jane Austen and Walter Scott tobe the most influential authors of the nineteenth century. A new digital edition of Anne Frank’s “The Diary of a Young Girl 
  8. Happy birthday, Virginia WoolfLos Angeles Times
    Today is the 131st anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s birth. Happy birthday, Virginia Woolf! Woolf was a groundbreaking writer, an incisive critic and a catalyst for the modernist movement in British letters. Among her most significant works are the 
  9. WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF’S BIRTHDAYThe Hour
    Legendary British author, Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882. On January 26, 2013 her birthday will be celebrated in a most auspicious way at the Wilton Library, 137 Old Ridgefield Road in Wilton. 20 actors have been scheduled to read from 
  10. Virginia Woolf and NeuropsychiatryPhys.Org (press release)
    Virginia Woolf and Neuropsychiatry, written by Maxwell Bennett, one of the leaders in the field of Vw and neuropsychiatryneurosciences, provides an explanation of the symptoms and untimely suicide of one of literature’s greatest authors, Virginia Woolf. The sources used are 
  11. Jaipur Literature Festival 2013: I am proud to be related to Virginia Woolf Zee News
    On Day 1 of the Jaipur Literature Festival 2013, Resham Sengar of Zeenews.com managed to have a quick chat with William Dalrymple who also happens to be the festival’s co-director. Read on to know what he said about being related to Virginia Woolf, his 
  12. A Writer’s Diary by Virginia Woolf – reviewThe Guardian
    “Greetings! my dear ghost,” Virginia Woolf addresses her older self whom she imagines might one day read the diary entry she is writing. The pages are haunted with such hypothetical selves but also with her fictional characters as they are brought into…
  13. The Israeli Virginia WoolfHaaretz
    “I am holding a book by the Israeli Virginia Woolf,” she announced. “You must write about it!” She handed then editor Benjamin Tammuz the first novel by Yael Medini, “Kavim U’keshatot” (“Arcs and Traces” ). Tammuz held Kahana-Carmon – a revered author 
  14. The joyous transgressions of Virginia Woolf’s OrlandoNew Statesman
    In Orlando (1928), Virginia Woolf did away with the usual co-ordinates of biography and set off through time as though it were an element, not a dimension. The story is simple: Orlando is a young nobleman, aged 16, in the reign of Elizabeth I. After a 

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Editors of the International Virginia Woolf Society newsletter, the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, are looking for contributions of VWM Queering Woolfdifferent kinds for the next issue. The following submissions are welcome:

  • information about upcoming conferences, symposia, reading and/or writing events
  • conference reports and reports from other gatherings (300 words or so)
  • book announcements, book readings – short book reviews (300 words or so)
  • interviews with creative writers working on Woolf-related things
  • reports on recent events and/or on exhibitions – notice of upcoming Woolf-related events and/or exhibitions
  • anything else that falls within the realm of the Woolfian

According to the submission guidelines, electronic submissions are preferred in MS Word and using MLA format. Hard-copy manuscripts will not be returned to the sender. Submissions are not refereed. In most cases, submissions are reviewed and selected by the editor of record for the issue in which the submission will be published.

Send submissions to Kathryn Simpson at k.l.simpson@bham.ac.uk by March 5.

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John Lehman

Information about John Lehmann and other Bloomsbury Group figures has been newly posted to the Mantex site.

Roy Johnson of Mantex Information Design wrote Blogging Woolf to say he has added half a dozen new resources connected to Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group to the site. Here they are, with links:

Find more Bloomsbury Group materials, as well as biographical notes, study guides and literary criticism on twentieth century authors, including Woolf and other Bloomsbury Group members.

Visit the Virginia Woolf at Mantex page. Woolf study guides on the site include:Between the Acts

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New work from Virginia Woolf will be out this summer. The work appeared in The Charleston Bulletin, a family newspaper founded by her Charleston Bulletinnephews, Quentin and Julian Bell, in the summer of 1923.

The vignettes, written or dictated by Woolf between 1923 and 1927 and published in The Charleston Bulletin’s Supplements, describe incidents and individuals of Woolf’s family and household, including servants and members of the Bloomsbury Group. Quentin Bell provided the illustrations.

An article in The Guardian says Woolf’s writing in these supplements shows her “affectionate, mischievous side.”

Helen Melody, curator of modern literary manuscripts at the British Library, says the work is likely the last unpublished work of Woolf.

Yet Stuart N. Clarke, editor of The Essays of Virginia Woolf, Vol 5. and a member of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain, maintains that each issue of the Virginia Woolf Bulletin includes at least one previously unpublished letter by Woolf. They include letters to Lady Aberconway, Mrs Easdale and Winifred Holtby.  Clarke says the Bulletin will soon include a number of letters written by Woolf to Lady Colefax.

The British Library, which acquired the works in 2003, will publish The Charleston Bulletin Supplements for the first time this June.

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