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Archive for May, 2016

Vanessa Bell née Stephen was born on this day in 1879. A key member in the creation of the Bloomsbury aesthetic, Vanessa was a prolific worker and over the course of her life produced vast quantiti…

Source: On Vanessa Bell’s Birthday: 30th May 1879

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The deadline for receipt of entries to the Angelica Garnett Undergraduate Essay Prize, sponsored by the International Virginia Woolf Society, is June 5.Virginia Woolf

This is the second annual undergraduate essay competition in honor of Virginia Woolf and in memory of Angelica Garnett, writer, artist, and daughter of Woolf’s sister, Vanessa Bell.

Essays can be on any topic pertaining to the writings of Virginia Woolf and should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words in length, including notes and works cited, with an original title of the entrant’s choosing.

Essays will be judged by the officers of the International Virginia Woolf Society: Kristin Czarnecki, president; Ann Martin, vice-president; Alice Keane, secretary-treasurer; and Drew Shannon, historian-bibliographer. The winner will receive $200 and have the essay published in the subsequent issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany. Please send essays in the latest version of Word.

To receive an entry form, please contact Kristin Czarnecki at kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu.

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The latest issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, Fall 2015/Winter 2016, Issue 88 is now available vwm88fall2015spring2016-cover1online, according to Vara Neverow, managing editor of the publication, which is published by the International Virginia Woolf Society.

Ann Martin, guest editor, has focused the issue on the special topic of “Virginia Woolf in the Modern Machine Age.” The special topic section of the issue includes eight essays and a poem.

The issue includes information about the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf (there’s still time to register!) and also includes the Call for Papers for the Second Annual Angelica Garnett Undergraduate Essay Prize ($200 and publication in the subsequent issue of the VWM).

The “Truly Miscellaneous” section of the issue features three contributions, one of which is a poem. The issue also includes calls for papers (including CFPs for future issues of the Miscellany), seven book reviews, the International Virginia Woolf Society column, and two generously discounted offers for published collections of essays on Virginia Woolf.

The print version will be available shortly.

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This 18-minute video produced by the British Library for its twentieth-century literature site and featuring Elaine Showalter is an excellent introduction to Mrs. Dalloway for first-time readers. But it will also enlighten those who have read the novel over and over again.

In it, the American critic and writer takes us to London for a discussion of Virginia Woolf’s 1925 novel. We view 1920s London streets and traffic; take a look inside 46 Gordon Square, Woolf’s first home as an independent woman; and get a look at the novel’s original hand-written manuscript.

In addition, Showalter explains the artistic, social and historical context for the groundbreaking novel that takes place on one day in June in 1923. You can also read her article on the topic, “Exploring consciousness and the modern: an introduction to Mrs Dalloway,” on the British Library website. At that link, you can view 165 images of Woolf’s notebooks for the novel and for her essays published in The Common Reader (1925).

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The new major summer exhibition at the Bath & North East Somerset Council-run Bloomsbury Rooms: Modernism, Subculture, DomesticityVictoria Art Gallery will recreate some of the famous Bloomsbury Group’s interior designs. The exhibition, A Room…

Source: ‘Designs’ on the Bloomsbury Group

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Aaron Gell will edit the male-centered blog, Beta Male.

A recent article by Jia Tolentino on the feminist blog Jezebel.com titled, “Sheesh, There’s a Reason Women Are ‘Totally Crushing It’ at the Confessional Essay” channels Woolf several times as Tolentino analyzes the future existence of a “new pop-up blog at New York Magazine, a six-week project called Beta Male.”

This new “pop-up blog” will highlight men’s writing, (and presumably, celebrate “beta males”) with a particular interest in the male confessional essay.

The editor of the new blog, Aaron Gell, who is the executive director of Maxim.com, sent out a call for submissions which Leah Finnegan published at Genius.com. Gell calls for men to “demonstrate” that they too can be “introspective” like women writers:

Among the many areas in which women are just totally crushing it lately (sheesh, women!) is the confessional essay. We would like to demonstrate that men can be introspective and self-aware, too. So by all means, whatever you pitch me, try to include a personal essay idea or two. These can be about sex and relationships, family, work, friendships, race, art, beauty, obsession, the body, war, childhood celebrity crushes, parenthood, butt play and/or shoes.

Tolentino alludes to (and links to) Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own several times as she questions the “outlets available for men to confess things about their personal lives online” and the confessional nature of women’s writing. Tolentino writes:

And as we are now in a cultural moment where people are—thankfully—interested in learning about social structures and what life is like for people who have suffered greater hardships, we have, to mixed effect, progressed on the personal essay front from “A Room of One’s Own” into sort of “A Room of One’s Own, Wallpapered With Identity and the Particular Difficult Things It Brings.”

Do men need a new room of their own in which to write and publish?

Or is the whole world their room?

Read Tolentino’s full post here.

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Alice Lowe, a Woolfian who contributes to Blogging Woolf, writesVirginia Woolf about what writers such as Virginia Woolf have taught her about solitude.

I acknowledge in my essay that the topic has been done to death, & I ask what I could possibly add to it. My own take, that’s what, which draws not just from personal experience but from …

Source: Solitude, blessed solitude…

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