Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2018

“Hilda and Virginia” starts today and runs through March 3. This double bill of two plays by veteran writer and activist Maureen Duffy, tells the stories of two remarkable women:

  • 7th-century abbess Hilda of Whitby, who brought Christianity to the Anglo-Saxons and was a teacher and adviser to kings, in “The Choice,” and
  • Virginia Woolf, who, in “A Nightingale In Bloomsbury Square,” looks back on her life, revealing the backdrop to her successful works.
The production is at the Jermyn Street Theatre, 16b Jermyn Street,, London SW1Y 6ST 020 7287 2875. Tickets are £30.

Read Full Post »

View of Porthminster Beach while walking to Talland House, June 2004

Last September Ratha Tep, a contributing writer for the New York Times Footsteps column, emailed me. She was looking for answers to questions and names of people to contact concerning Virginia Woolf and St. Ives.

Her piece, “In Search of Virginia Woolf’s Lost Eden in Cornwall,” appeared online today and will be in the March 4 print edition. It is marvelous, full of history, love for Woolf as a literary and feminist pioneer, and touring tips for St. Ives and Cornwall that connect us to Virginia’s experiences there.

It also provides an optimistic update about the apartment complex to be built below Talland House that threatened the view and elicited protests from Woolfians around the globe nearly three years ago.

Connecting to the Tate exhibit

Tep’s travelogue is quite timely as well, connecting to the Tate St. Ives exhibit, “Virginia Woolf: An Exhibition Inspired by Her Writings.” Sadly, that show ends April 29, nearly two months before many of us will be in England for the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf.

I visited St. Ives in 2004, taking the six-hour train ride on the Great Western Railway, visiting Talland House — where we were invited in by the woman who occupied the first floor flat — and traipsing around the charming town.

I have not been back since then. After reading Tepp’s piece, my desire to return is stronger than ever.

Long an admirer of this modernist literary pioneer, not only for how Woolf redefined the possibilities of the novel but, for the simple reason that no other writer has given me, sentence for sentence, such pleasure, I decided to go in search of Woolf in her early years. – Ratha Tep, NYT

Porthminster Beach, June 2004

St. Ives Bay, with Godrevy Island and lighthouse in the distance, June 2004

Read Full Post »

Lots of Woolf on the Web these days. Here are a few important sightings gleaned via Twitter links shared by Jane deGay and Maggie Humm.

  • Sentencing Orlando: Virginia Woolf and the Morphology of the Modernist Sentence, edited by Elsa Högberg and Amy Bromley, is a collection of 16 original essays offers fresh perspectives on Orlando through a unique attention to Woolf’s sentences.
  • Six Ways Virginia Woolf Pre-Empted Spring’s Key Looks,” by Kaye Fearon in British Vogue, Feb. 21, 2018.
  • Bonnie Greer on Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group, a podcast discussing the friendships, work and designs behind the artists, coordinated with the Virginia Woolf exhibition at Tate St Ives, 10 February – 29 April 2018. Then view her art walk below.

Read Full Post »

Happy 91st birthday to Cecil Woolf, author, publisher, conference attendee and speaker, Bloomsbury walker, party giver, plaque unveiler, and the oldest living relative of Virginia and Leonard Woolf.

We wish we could be with you to celebrate today. Instead, dear man, we toast you from near and far.

You can read more about him in last year’s birthday post.

Cecil Woolf cuts the cake designed by Cressida Bell for the 100th birthday party of the Hogarth Press last June in Reading, England.

Cecil Woolf, accompanied by his wife Jean Moorcroft Wilson, talks about being The Other Boy at the Hogarth Press at the 100th birthday party for the Hogarth Press in Reading, England last June.

Cecil Woolf published his story, The Other Boy at the Hogarth Press, last spring, unveiling it at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf.

Cecil Woolf and Jean Moorcroft Wilson at their post-conference party last June at their London townhouse.

Cecil Woolf stops at 46 Gordon Square, London, while giving Blogging Woolf a personalized tour of Bloomsbury in June 2016.

Taking a break with Cecil Woolf in the Tavistock Square garden after the 2016 Woolf conference.

Read Full Post »

The topic of the International Virginia Woolf Society‘s guaranteed panel at the Modern Language Association Convention 2019 will be “Night and Day at 100.”

Panel organizers have issued a call for papers on Virginia Woolf’s novel in the centennial year of its publication that address the question: What is the twenty-first century legacy of Woolf’s “nineteenth-century” novel?

Please send 250-word abstracts to Mary Wilson at mwilson4@umassd.edu by March 12. Wilson, associate professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, is the author of The Labors of Modernism and Rhys Matters.

Read Full Post »

Back in January, in response to Blogging Woolf’s tweet about a Virginia Woolf punch, Maggie Humm tweeted about Virginia Woolf and wine, saying she had a list of Woolf quotes referencing the fermented beverage.

The emeritus professor at the University of East London provided them at our request, apologizing for the lack of complete citations. Grateful for her contribution, we gladly forgive her.

The quotes, said Maggie, a Woolf scholar and author, were on a brief list she sent to the Tate for the launch of her 2006 book Snapshots of Bloomsbury, at the London Review of Books.

We share them with you here — and raise a glass to Virginia Woolf, with love on Valentine’s Day 2018.

Woolf quotes on wine

  • 1936 to Ethel Smyth the feminist composer: ‘Oh and the champagne! How I like it.
  • 1937 to Vita Sackville-West: ‘shant I be thankful to be in a courtyard in France, listening to a nightingale, drinking red wine, while you are curtseying & singing God Save the King’.
  • 1938 to Quentin Bell: ‘Wine would be a passport to my heart, its true’.
  • 1939 to Ethel Smyth: ‘How it liberates the soul to drink a bottle of good wine daily & sit in the sun’.
  • 1929 Cassis: ‘Nessa’s villa…a delicious life, with a great deal of wine, cheap cigars, conversation’.
  • 1931 to Ethel Smyth from Bergerac (Woolf likes Bergerac wine): `Just dined off eels, artichokes and wine – slightly tipsy’.
  • 1940 Diary: ‘All the young English drink spirits. I like wine. Air raids much less’.
  • 1931 Diary: ‘Wine at lunch flushes me & floats me’.
  • Room of One’s Own: ‘I blandly told them to drink wine and have a room of their own’.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Read Full Post »

Bloomsburiana, the first issue of the Annual Bulletin of the Italian Virginia Woolf Society, is out.

I was lucky enough to meet Elisa Bolchi and Sara Sullam, two members of the new society, at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf last June in Reading, England. The following month, Elisa, who is the society’s president, sent Blogging Woolf a report on what the group and its members — 84 at the time — were doing.

Recently, Elisa was kind enough to share the bulletin with Blogging Woolf, so we are sharing it with you here.  It is an attractive publication with original cover art by Lucrezia Gentile, and it is definitely worth a long look.

The society has a Facebook page, as well as a website, which society founders are working on making bilingual.

Elisa Bolchi and Sara Sullam, two members of the new Italian Virginia Woolf Society who attended last June’s Woolf conference in Reading, England. Elisa is the society’s president.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: