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Archive for the ‘28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf’ Category

I’d heard the rumor — that a Virginia Woolf “collage” could be spotted in the ladies room of London’s Tavistock Hotel. But I did not expect what I actually found.

Tavistock Hotel in Bloomsbury, London

I went in search of the hotel’s unusual homage to Woolf after the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf in June at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England.

The clerk at the Tavistock’s front desk directed me to the lobby level ladies room, where I expected to see a lone framed Woolf collage on the wall near the door or the sinks.

Loo decor

I found something entirely different. The wall behind each toilet in each ladies room stall was decorated with a long framed graphic featuring Woolf and her works. Each was cut to feature a different element of her work.

Luckily, the ladies room was unoccupied when I entered, so I was able to take a photograph of each stall. However, some of my photos are a bit tipsy, due to the fact that I had to prop each stall door open with my foot while hurriedly snapping individual pictures.

I made sure to include the commode and toilet tissue roll in the photo when I could manage it, as evidence that this Woolf sighting actually took place in a loo. 

 

The hotel’s Woolf & Whistle serves light meals and beverages.

Traditional afternoon tea is also offered at the Tavistock Hotel’s Woolf & Whistle.

 

About the Tavistock

Blue plaque honoring Virginia and Leonard Woolf installed to the left of the front entrance of the Tavistock Hotel.

The hotel is famous because it is built on the site of Virginia and Leonard’s flat at 52 Tavistock Square, in which they lived from 1924-1939.

A blue plaque commemorating that fact was unveiled on the exterior of the building in April.

 

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Art inspired by Virginia Woolf always inspires me. And that was the case at the 28th Annual  International Conference on Virginia Woolf last June at Woolf College at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England.

Luz Novillo-Corvalán

Woolfian Artists

Luz Novillo-Corvalán from Argentina’s University of Cordoba was one of three artists on the “Woolfian Artists” panel the first morning of the conference.

The others were Ane Thon Knutsen with “Reading Woolf from the Type Case Perspective: Finding Artistic Freedom Through ‘The Mark on the Wall'” and Adriane Little with “Virginia Woolf Was Here” in which she combined Woolf’s words with water from Woolf sites.

Portraits and more

Luz’s presentation, “Portraits of Radical Women: From Anais Nin to Virginia Woolf,” featured her lovely portraits of those artists and others, embroidered in one continuous chain stitch on paper.  The Woolf portrait is pictured below, along with other pieces Luz displayed — and sold — at the conference.

Luz Novillo-Corvalán’s embroidered portrait of Virginia Woolf

“Why should men drink wine and women water,” asks Virginia Woolf in A Room of One’s Own, and Luz Novillo-Corvalán adds a new twist to the question by embroidering it on a handkerchief.

Displayed at the conference: paper art with a Woolf theme featuring The Waves, Orlando and Monk’s House from Luz Novillo-Corvalán.

Luz Novillo-Corvalán’s artistic interpretation of The Waves

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Call for papers: Louisville Conference 2019

The International Virginia Woolf Society will host its 19th consecutive panel at the University of Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, Feb. 21-23, 2019. The group invites proposals for critical papers on any topic concerning Woolf studies. A particular panel theme may be chosen depending on the proposals received.

Please submit by email a cover page with your name, email address, mailing address, phone number, professional affiliation (if any), and the title of your paper, and a second anonymous page containing a 250-word paper proposal with title, to Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu, by Sept. 17.

Call for Papers: Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace

Clemson University Press, in association with Liverpool University Press, will publish a two-volume edited collection of proceedings from the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace. Each book will consist of around 15 full-length essays (likely to be around 6,000-7,000 words). The work on this will be carried out over a two-year period, so that it is available by the time of the 2020 conference.

One of the big advantages is that it will allow ideas presented at the conference to be developed and shaped by what came out of discussions in individual panels and the conference more broadly while allowing editors to include roughly the same number of contributors as in the previous format.

Both volumes will be titled Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace, but will likely have different subtitles to signal the specific focus of each book (to be decided once submissions have been received).

Conference presenters who would like to be considered for inclusion in the volumes should send an extended abstract of 500 words and a short biographical statement by the extended deadline of Friday, Sept. 14, to vwoolf2018@gmail.com. Once the selection has been finalized, contributors will have until the end of March 2019 to complete chapters.

Call for papers: Collecting Woolf and your bookshelf

And don’t forget to submit a proposal for the upcoming themed issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany on “Collecting Woolf.” The deadline for submissions has been extended to Sept. 30. Get the details.

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Blogging Woolf’s photos from the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held at Woolf College at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, are now available via Flickr. If you were there, see if you can spot yourself. If you weren’t, see who was.

You can access them via the top link in the right sidebar or take a look here.

Read about #Woolf2018 and #DallowayDay

You can also read more posts about the conference, along with those covering Woolf-related pre-conference travel and events in the UK:

 

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A fabulous four days of Virginia Woolf in the company of Woolfians from around the world ended today.

And as we all scatter to various parts of the globe, we look forward to connecting again next year for the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Woolf and Social Justice at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 6-9, 2019.

Blogging Woolf’s tweets from the last two days are below, along with a message from The Woolf Project.

Note from The Woolf Project coordinator Emma Bainbridge thanking conference-goers for their help in creating a crocheted and knitted chair cover that will be reworked into blankets for Knit for Peace.

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Virginia Woolf knitted. Vanessa Bell crocheted. And we are doing both at #Woolf2018.

V Woolf knitting portrait

Vanessa Bell painting of Woolf knitting in an armchair

The 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at Woolf College at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, includes the Woolf Project. And like the theme of the conference — Virginia Woolf, Europe, and Peace — the Woolf Project focuses on peace as well.

Woolf knitting

It reimagines Bell’s portrait of Woolf knitting in an armchair by covering it with pieces knitted and crocheted by conference-goers and University of Kent staff.

Throughout the conference, participants are picking up knitting needles and crochet hooks and choosing yarn from a basket full of colorful skeins and balls to fashion squares and other shapes. These are being joined together to cover an armchair placed in the midst of the conference space.

Knit for Peace

Once the conference is over, the chair cover will be taken apart by Emma Brainbridge of Kent, who has overseen the project, and transformed into blankets for the charity Knit for Peace.

knitting is the saving of life – Virginia Woolf

The Woolf Project in action

A variety of yarn,, hooks, and needles are available for conference-goers to pick up and use.

Emma Bainbridge of Kent with the armchair in its nearly complete cover, complete with accessory pillow.

The Woolf Project armchair covered in crocheted and knitted squares and other shapes created by conference-goers.

Even the back of the armchair is covered with handwork of many colors, shapes, and designs.

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On day one of #Woolf2018 at the University of Kent in Canterbury there were lots of choices. The program for the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf offers six different panels of experts in the morning and another six in the afternoon. I believe I chose well.

Here are the two excellent panels I picked Thursday, along with twitter reports on them, as well as the keynote lecture from Claire Davison of the Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris 3 on “European Peace in Pieces? Woolf, Music and the Radiophonic Imagination.”

Apologies for not having the energy to write more and for such dim photos. The rooms in which the panels were held were dimly lit to allow for slides.

Woolfian Artists

  • Ane Thon Knutsen (Oslo National Academy of The Arts), ‘Reading Woolf from the Type Case Perspective: Finding Artistic Freedom through “The Mark on The Wall”’
  • Adriane Little (Western Michigan), ‘Virginia Woolf Was Here’
  • Luz Novillo-Corvalán (UNC, Argentina) ‘Portraits of Radical Women: From Anaï​s Nin to Virginia Woolf’ Note: Luz also created the conference graphic.

Propaganda and the Press

  • Judith Allen (Pennsylvania), ‘Intersections: Propaganda and Just War Theory’
  • Trudi Tate (Cambridge), ‘Virginia Woolf and The Times: Lies, War, and Democracy’
  • Lois J. Gilmore (Bucks County), ‘“Authors Take Sides”: Art, Writing, and Peace’

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