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Archive for the ‘28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf’ Category

Woolfians from around the world are converging on Canterbury, England this week for the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf with its theme of Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace.

“[E]ven compared with Florence and Venice there is no lovelier place in the world than Canterbury,” Woolf wrote.

Play along as we track Virginia Woolf’s journey to the conference. Then stay tuned for more. #travelswithvirginiawoolf

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Virginia Woolf travels by train from London’s St. Pancras station to Canterbury.

Woolf at Kent

Virginia admires the brochure for the University of Kent’s Woolf College, which is named after her.

Virginia grounds herself in the words of Geoffrey Chaucer as she visits the bronze statue dedicated to him two years ago along Canterbury’s High Street.

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You could say I procrastinated. Or you could say my timing is perfect. Either way, my monograph for Cecil Woolf Publishers, The Bloomsbury Pacifists and the Great War, is finished.

Although I have been working on this project since 2012, when I was fortunate enough to receive a Berg Fellowship from the New York Public Library, I didn’t start writing it until this year.

And that’s why I say my timing is perfect, although I didn’t plan it. For this year is the final centenary year of the First World War. And this year is also the year that the theme of the annual Virginia Woolf conference is “Virginia Woolf, Europe, and Peace.” So rather than call my delay common procrastination, I’ll call it synergy.

The monograph will be one of two new volumes in his Bloomsbury Heritage series that Cecil Woolf will bring along to next week’s 28th Annual International Woolf Conference on Virginia Woolf, June 20-24 in Canterbury, England. The other is Hilary Newman’s Virginia Woolf and Edith Sitwell. Hilary is prolific. She has written ten other monographs in the series.

You can check them out, along with the entire list in the series, on Cecil’s page. The two latest will be added soon.

Virginia Woolf, Europe, and Peace

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The program for Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace: The 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, which will be held June 21-24 at Woolf College at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, is now online.

Registration is open until June 10. Download the program.

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Sure, we’re all rushing around getting ready for the holidays. But with 2017 drawing to a close, here’s a reminder that the call for papers for the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf is open until Feb. 1, 2018.

Topic for the conference, June 21-24 at the University of Kent, is “Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace.” Get the details. For more, contact vwoolf2018@gmail.com

The latest news is that keynote lectures will be given by Professor Rosi Braidotti of Utrecht University,  Professor Claire Davison of Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris 3, and Dr. Jane Goldman of the University of Glasgow.

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Marking 100 years since the end of the First World War and 80 years since the publication of Three Guineas, the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, invites papers addressing the dual theme of Europe and Peace. Download the call for papers.

From the ‘prying’, ‘insidious’ ‘fingers of the European War’ that Septimus Warren Smith would never be free of in Mrs. Dalloway to Woolf’s call to ‘think peace into existence’ during the Blitz in ‘Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid’, questions of war and peace pervade her writings. They are also central to Woolf’s Bloomsbury circle, exemplified in John Maynard Keynes’ The Economic Consequences of the Peace, Clive Bell’s Peace at Once and Leonard Woolf’s Quack, Quack!

While seeking proposals that address the European contexts and cultures of modernism between wars, we also encourage exploration of how these writings can help us think through what it might mean to create peace in Europe today amid various political, humanitarian, economic and environmental crises.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Bloomsbury and pacifism
  • Literature of the First and Second World Wars
  • The Spanish Civil War
  • The Armistice and Paris Peace Conference
  • Three Guineas and its legacies
  • International/transnational/cosmopolitan Woolf
  • Bloomsbury and the European avant-garde
  • Feminism, queer studies and LGBT+ politics
  • Empire, race and ethnicity
  • Woolf and continental philosophy/theory
  • European translations of Woolf and Bloomsbury
  • Ecological/environmental/economic crises
  • Violence, trauma and fascism
  • Bloomsbury and classical antiquity
  • Woolf across visual art, film, dance and music
  • Travel writing and European journeys

Abstracts of a maximum of  200 words for single papers and 500 words for panels should be sent to vwoolf2018@gmail.com by 1 February 2018.

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