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Archive for the ‘29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf’ Category

“The Salon and the Press” was the title of this fun, lively, and informative afternoon session at the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, with chair Zachary Hacker of St. Ursula Academy.

The panel included:

  • Alive Staveley of Stanford, “Buying and Selling Modernism: The Hogarth Press Order Books”
  • Peter Morgan of Stanford, “Flung into Basements”
  • Julie Daoud and students of Thomas More College, “Voices in Bloom in the 21st Century: Reimagining the Salon’ as Chat-Room’ and Recasting Voices as if Embedded in the Net-Generation.”

Below are Blogging Woolf’s live tweets from the session.

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The Ten Principles

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It’s been a long day at the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, too long to write about in detail, but here are a few visuals.

Be afraid, says Jenna Nomes De Gruy. Find her on Instagram @virginialovesvita

“An Interdisciplinary Approach to ‘A Room of One’s Own” with Mount St. Joseph University faculty Iris Spoor, Elizabeth Mason, Lisa Wagner Crews, and Kristina Broadbeck. This was just one of a dozen morning breakout sessions.

Ellen Mclaughlin, playwright and author of “Septimus and Clarissa,”  presents “Woolf and Empathy, Her Sly Revolutionary Art” as the last plenary of the day, paying a poetic tribute to her own mother and Virginia Woolf and how she came to read, appreciate, and love the author and learn about her mother.

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It’s day one of the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, with its theme of social justice, at the University of Mount Saint Joseph in Cincinnati.

Beth Rigel Daugherty, Leslie Hankins and Diane Gillespie presented a panel on “Portraying and Projecting Age, Ageism, and Activism” on day one.

The agenda was full with registration; an opening session; three breakout sessions, each with a choice of six panels ranging from Woolf and race to Queering Woolf; and a plenary session with Dr. Elizabeth Abel of UC Berkeley on “The Smashed Mosaic: Virginia Woolf and African American Modernism.”

The day ended with “Hours in a Library,” a wine and cheese reception at the Mercantile Library in downtown Cincinnati, where conference participants met and mingled among the books.

Take a look at the place where readers, writers, and thinkers have gathered since 1835.

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If you want to attend the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, with its theme of Virginia Woolf and Social Justice, today is your last opportunity to register.

Hosted by Mount St. Joseph University, it will be held in Cincinnati, Ohio from June 6-9.

Here are important links for the four-day event.

Questions? Contact  VWoolf2019@msj.edu

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Woolf in the #MeToo era, Woolf and theater, and Woolf and inclusivity are among the topics that will be covered at the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, with its theme of Woolf and Social Justice, at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 6-9.
The conference’s plenary speakers will include the following:
  • Elizabeth Abel (UC Berkeley) on Woolf and the Literary Implications of Social Justice
  • Anne Fernald (Fordham University) and Tonya Krouse (Northern Kentucky University) on Woolf in the Era of #MeToo
  • Kristin Czarnecki (Georgetown College) and Erica Delsandro (Bucknell University) on Woolf and Inclusivity
  • Ellen McLaughlin (Actor “Angels in America,” among many others], Director, Playwright “Septimus and Clarissa,” “A Narrow Bed,” among others) on Woolf, Theater, and Activism.
Other events include:
  • The June 6 evening celebration will be at the historic Taft Art Museum in downtown Cincinnati, a Greek revival, National Historic Landmark building that originally served as the home of the Taft family (and from which William Howard Taft accepted his presidential nomination in 1908).  The museum will be closed to the public and attendees will be able to peruse the collection and the garden at their leisure.
  • June 7 will feature a performance of Leonard Woolf’s play “The Hotel,” featuring students and faculty from the Mount and supervised by McLaughlin.
  • An all-conference roundtable event will conclude the conference on Sunday morning, June 9, to be followed by a visit to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in downtown Cincinnati, a museum commemorating Cincinnati’s historic location as the border between North and South, and the place to which escaped slaves fled to their freedom.

Deadline for the call for papers is Jan. 31.

Thinking is my fighting – Virginia Woolf, “Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid,” 1940

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