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Paula Maggio:

This is a wonderful piece that puts Bloomsbury art in the social, political and cultural context of the 1920s-1930s.

Originally posted on The Charleston Attic:

There was one item in the Gift this week which particularly caught our eye, as it documents two different aspects of Duncan Grant’s life as an artist; his creative style and his status as a member of the British art world.

CHA-P-1415-R_red

CHA-P-1415 Recto: Duncan Grant, drawing, nude woman carrying a basket, ink on paper, 20.1 cm x 14.1 cm. Photograph © The Charleston Trust

On one side of this postcard-sized piece of cream card is an ink drawing of a bare-breasted woman carrying what appears to be a basket of flowers. While there is no annotation or attribution accompanying the drawing, the classical theme and stylised figure suggest that it was made by Grant, possibly as a study for a decorative scheme. For example, it is reminiscent of the figures in Grant and Bell’s large interior painting of 1929 for Penns in the Rocks, the home of the poet, Lady…

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Charleston AtticOh, the lovely connections we make in the world of Woolf. This time, the connection gives us all a behind-the-scenes look at Charleston, the Sussex site known as Bloomsbury in the country.

Alice Purkiss, a curatorial trainee at The Charleston Trust, contacted Blogging Woolf via a Facebook message last week to ask that we help publicize The Charleston Attic. The blog was created by Purkiss and fellow trainee Dorian Knight, who just left the project. His replacement at Charleston is Samantha Wilson.

CharlestonIn existence one year,The Charleston Attic shares the trainees’ research at the former home of Vanessa Bell and her family and includes discussions of Woolf and her works. According to the blog, it “is a record of our work cataloguing, researching and interpreting the Angelica Garnett Gift from the Charleston attic – overlooked by a bust of Virginia Woolf.”

Recent posts of particular interest to Woolfians include:

The curatorial trainee project with the Charleston Trust provides for six-month training periods for a dozen trainees over three years.

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In the closing lines of Mrs. Dalloway (1925), Virginia Woolf wrote these lines for Peter Walsh: “It is Clarissa, he said. For there she was.”Virginia Woolf in words

A variation on that theme popped into my head last Saturday when I attended a party at Pure Intentions, an organic wheat grass grower in Akron, Ohio. As I opened the door into the building, the first thing I saw was Woolf.

“Oh, it’s Virginia,” I said aloud, for on the wall facing the doorway was a large, unique and haunting portrait of Woolf with eyes that followed me wherever I went.

What made the heavy framed portrait even more mesmerizing was the fact that her features, facial contours, hair and clothing were all formed from the text of A Room of One’s Own (1929).

The portrait’s appropriate title, A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf, suggested so many weighty layers of meaning that my own head felt filled with a tumbling jumble of words and their various meanings.

Kathy Evans, owner and operator of the wheat grass business and its School of Energy, said someone gave her the portrait. She explained that she hung it above an overstuffed chair so that Woolf could look down on the intelligent folks who settled in for a good read.

I wished I had asked more questions about the Woolf portrait, but I thought I would be able to Google it and find one for myself. So far, no luck.

Perhaps I will have to go back to Pure Intentions for another look and more questions. For I just can’t get the Woolf face made of words out of my head.

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If you won’t be able to take a seat on the Mrs. Dalloway bench in Gordon Square, this summer, you can still see it up close. Artist Fiona Osborne of One Red Shoe has generously shared photos of the bench at various stages of her artistic process.

If you look closely, you can even see her workspace in some of the photos, including drop cloth, paint pots and brushes, a blow dryer, and natural light streaming through a round window.

Osborne’s Mrs. Dalloway bench is one of  50 installed by the National Literacy Trust for its Books About Town art trail. Each is shaped as an open book and is decorated by a professional illustrator or local artist.

Side view of the Mrs. Dalloway bench

Side view of the Mrs. Dalloway bench

 

Front view featuring Clarissa Dalloway

Front view featuring Clarissa Dalloway

Front view in progress

Front view in progress

Close-up of back view featuring Septimus Warren Smith

Close-up of back view featuring Septimus Warren Smith

Back view in progress

Back view in progress

Detail of the orchid

Detail of the orchid

Detail of the swallow

Detail of the swallows

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Amanda Ann White creates collages, using paper clipped from old magazines. And sometimes the subject of her collages is Monk’s House.

Night and Day, Monk's House

Night and Day, Monk’s Househer collages is Monk’s House.

White emailed Blogging Woolf to share her collages of Virginia Woolf’s Sussex home, which are sold in the home’s new shop.

“The images of Monk’s House were the first things that went into the new shop incorporated into Monk’s House. In fact they were on sale before it was installed. They sell as cards and small prints there. Visitors to Monks House do seem to like them,” White wrote.

She also sells the collages at her Etsy shop. Larger high quality art prints are available on her website in the Giclee section.

White says she will offer new cards based on details from a long picture of the house and garden, which is a design for a bookmark, later in the year.

Collage is a not a new topic for Woolfians. The subject came up on the VWoolf Listserv in 2012.

Monk's House 1931

Monk’s House 1931

After the Waves: Virginia Woolf's Writing Lodge

After the Waves Virginia Woolf’s Writing Lodge

 

Monk's House Welcome Home

Monk’s House Welcome Home

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Anne Olivier Bell, editor of The Diary of Virginia Woolf, a 25-year labor of love, has been awarded an MBE in the New Year Honours 2014. She was cited “For services to Literature and the Arts.”

Bell, of Lewes, East Sussex, is also a trustee of the Charleston Trust. In August, an article in The Guardian celebrated her part in repatriating works of art following World War II.

The film The Monuments Men, as those who protected the greatest works of art and buildings were called, will be released Feb. 7. It stars George Clooney as George Stout and Cate Blanchett as Rose Valland, a member of the French resistance who tracked down thousands of stolen works of art.

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Here’s a preview of Lottie Cole’s “Bloomsbury Interiors” show on Nov. 19 at Cricket Fine Art, 2 Park Walk, SW10.

http://youtu.be/SHqWpCpmQ_4

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