Archive for the ‘art’ Category

Eleanor Crook created a life-sized Virginia Woolf that was presented, fully dressed, inside a room of her own — a wooden wardrobe — on Oct. 21.

The finished wax work Woolf was placed in the foyer of the newly refurbished Virginia Woolf building at 22 Kingsway at King’s College, London. Woolf was a student at the former King’s Ladies’ Department where she took classes in Greek, Latin, history and German between 1897 and 1902.

To find out more about the unveiling, scroll down for the tweets posted on Twitter.



Read Full Post »

The Charleston Attic blog asks: Can art transport one back to childhood? Read on to find out how a discovery at Charleston helps answer the question.

This week in the gift we discovered a collection of childhood drawings by Angelica Garnett; immersed in their whimsical world of elaborately dressed dowagers, fugitive pets and fairy princesses.

Source: Child’s Play | The Charleston Attic

Read Full Post »

Eleanor Crook is creating a life-sized Virginia Woolf that will be presented, fully dressed, inside a room of her own — a wooden wardrobe.

The finished wax work Woolf will be placed in the foyer of the newly refurbished Virginia Woolf building at 22 Kingsway at King’s College, London.

by Lady Ottoline Morrell, vintage snapshot print, June 1923

by Lady Ottoline Morrell, vintage snapshot print, June 1923

Crook, a sculptor and medical artist, will dress her creation in clothing modeled after the dress, shawl and hat Woolf wore in a 1923 photograph taken by Lady Ottoline Morell. It pictures Woolf sitting side by side on a garden bench with Lytton Strachey. She is smoking.

According to Crook’s website, she was asked by the historian Dr. Ruth Richardson and by King’s College London to make the wax version of Woolf.

You can view her progress on the sculpture by viewing photos Crook has included on her website. She expects the work to be finished in October.

Woolf was a student at the former King’s Ladies’ Department where she took classes in Greek, Latin, history and German between 1897 and 1902.




Read Full Post »

Ozlem and her Work

Ozlem displaying her work at the “Mark on the Wall” exhibition

It has been almost one month since the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, but I am still thinking about all of the great events and presentations from the conference.

One of the highlights from this year’s conference was the “Mark on the Wall” exhibition, which presented art work that was inspired by Virginia Woolf and her female contemporaries. Artists from around the world were represented, and I had the lucky opportunity to interview one of the artists whose work was selected for this exhibition.

Ozlem Habibe Mutaf Buyukarman is an assistant professor of graphic design at Yeditepe University in Turkey. After seeing her piece, “Do Not Call Me Anything IV” displayed at the “Mark on the Wall” exhibition, I asked her a few questions about her work:

In what ways do you think this piece connects with Virginia Woolf and/or the Modernist movement?

Ozlem: In my artwork “Do Not Call Me Anything IV”, you can see knee high stockings worn with trousers by a woman (who probably has a room of her own). The knee-high women’s stockings are a metaphorical expression of stepping forward. This is what modernist women writers and artists do I believe. Along with the stockings I placed labels/tags which stand for the prejudice against women. Thus, the name of the series is “Do Not Call Me Anything.” Also, in terms of style, this is not a decorative piece or an oil on canvas; it is based on experimental, instantaneous involvements of objects and textures presenting the drama of modern life with its consuming, exhausting and unstable condition. This differentiates it and makes it modern, I suppose.

“Do Not Call Me Anything IV”

Much of your work, including “Do Not Call Me Anything IV,” seems to put a focus on women’s clothing. In what ways does your work speak to and for women?

Ozlem: The clothing items are somehow the witnesses of our lives, our passions, our emotional commitments, the violence we faced to both physical and psychological in a modern, demanding world. They may symbolise the abandoned self or the avant-gardist… I present the aesthetics of personal items while documenting them, a moment of confrontation.

As a female artist, what kinds of struggles do you think that women artists face today?

Ozlem: Still many… women have to wear many hats at a time. And women writers or artists around the world are facing many struggles such as censorship, visibility and representational issues. Virginia Woolf inspired many women all around the world.

You can view Ozlem’s work and all of the exhibition selections in the “Mark on the Wall Online Catalogue”.

Read Full Post »

The juried Mark on the Wall exhibition at the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf presents artists from all over the world who have been inspired by Woolf and her female contemporaries.

The show of works on paper attracted woolf_callforentriesmore than 400 submissions, with 49 chosen for the exhibit, including Susie Lilly, a former women’s studies student of mine at the University of Akron, where she graduated with a degree in art.

The opening and awards presentation will be 6-8 p.m. Thursday, June 4, at The Gallery at Greenly Center, 50 East Main St., Bloomsburg. The exhibit runs through June 30.

Those chosen are: TBettina Badr • Laura Bernstein • Mischa Brown • Deborah Bruns-Thomas • Dylan Collins • Laura Collins • Ozlem Habibe Mutaf Buyukarman • Maria DiMauro • Elaine M. Erne • Nicole Foran • Anita Ford • Leah Gallant • Lori Glavin • Stephanie Haughton • Craig Hill • Susie Lilley • Erika Lizée • Yvonne Love • Janet Maher • Jo Margolis • Marcella Marsella • Tonia Matthews • Alberto Meza • Chieko Murasugi • Jacqueline-Dee Parker • Frank Pulaski • Dana Scott • Carolyn Sheehan • David Thomas • Rhonda Thomas-Urdang • Maxene White • Jacqueline Young

Read Full Post »

Paula Maggio:

This is a wonderful piece that puts Bloomsbury art in the social, political and cultural context of the 1920s-1930s.

Originally posted on The Charleston Attic:

There was one item in the Gift this week which particularly caught our eye, as it documents two different aspects of Duncan Grant’s life as an artist; his creative style and his status as a member of the British art world.


CHA-P-1415 Recto: Duncan Grant, drawing, nude woman carrying a basket, ink on paper, 20.1 cm x 14.1 cm. Photograph © The Charleston Trust

On one side of this postcard-sized piece of cream card is an ink drawing of a bare-breasted woman carrying what appears to be a basket of flowers. While there is no annotation or attribution accompanying the drawing, the classical theme and stylised figure suggest that it was made by Grant, possibly as a study for a decorative scheme. For example, it is reminiscent of the figures in Grant and Bell’s large interior painting of 1929 for Penns in the Rocks, the home of the poet, Lady…

View original 1,048 more words

Read Full Post »

Charleston AtticOh, the lovely connections we make in the world of Woolf. This time, the connection gives us all a behind-the-scenes look at Charleston, the Sussex site known as Bloomsbury in the country.

Alice Purkiss, a curatorial trainee at The Charleston Trust, contacted Blogging Woolf via a Facebook message last week to ask that we help publicize The Charleston Attic. The blog was created by Purkiss and fellow trainee Dorian Knight, who just left the project. His replacement at Charleston is Samantha Wilson.

CharlestonIn existence one year,The Charleston Attic shares the trainees’ research at the former home of Vanessa Bell and her family and includes discussions of Woolf and her works. According to the blog, it “is a record of our work cataloguing, researching and interpreting the Angelica Garnett Gift from the Charleston attic – overlooked by a bust of Virginia Woolf.”

Recent posts of particular interest to Woolfians include:

The curatorial trainee project with the Charleston Trust provides for six-month training periods for a dozen trainees over three years.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,604 other followers

%d bloggers like this: