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VWM Queering WoolfThe Virginia Woolf Miscellany invites submissions of papers for the Fall 2015 issue that address the role of everyday machines in the life and/or works of Virginia Woolf.

From typewriters and telephones to gramophones and the wireless; from motor-cars and combat aeroplanes to trains and department store elevators; from cameras and film projectors to ranges and hot-water tanks, the commonplace technologies of the modern machine age leave their trace on Bloomsbury.

To what extent are these and other machines represented, hidden, implied, avoided, embraced, or questioned by Woolf and her circle and characters?  What is the place of labour and mass production, or the role of the handmade or bespoke object, in the context of such technologies and the desires with which they are implicated?  What are the ramifications for the individual’s everyday navigation of modernity, domesticity, and/or community? Alternatively, what is the influence of everyday technologies on our own interactions with Woolf and her writings?

Please submit papers of no more than 2,500 words to Ann Martin at ann.martin@usask.ca by 31 March 2015. Martin is assistant professor of English at the University of Saskatchewan

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25th annual conferenceNews from the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, which will be held June 4-7 at Bloomsburg University in Bloomsburg, Pa., includes the following:

  • Extension of the deadline for submission of paper proposals to midnight Saturday, Jan. 31.
  • Clarification that proposals focusing solely on Woolf are welcome.
  • A call for entries in a juried exhibition of small works on paper that is fittingly woolf_callforentriestitled Mark on the Wall. The entry deadline for those is April 20. The international call for works on paper was inspired by visual artists who focus on Woolf, such as Elisa Kay Sparks, and Bloomsburg University’s new art gallery, according to conference organizer Julie Vandivere.
  • An announcement that Cassandra Laity, who will start a new journal on modernist women writers, will be at the conference to talk about the project and recruit a variety of voices for the new venture.

Get the conference highlights.

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25th annual conferenceConference organizers have issued a call for papers on the topic, Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries for the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, sponsored by Bloomsburg University, which will take place in Bloomsburg, Penn., June 4-7, 2015. See the interactive or PDF version of the campus map.

The conference topic seeks to contextualize Virginia Woolf’s writing alongside the work of her contemporaries. This unprecedented number of women writers — experimentalists, middlebrow authors, journalists, poets, and editors — was simultaneously contributing to, as well as complicating, modernist literature. In what ways did these burgeoning communities and enclaves of women writers intersect with (or coexist alongside) Virginia Woolf?

The conference welcomes proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, and workshops from literary and interdisciplinary scholars, creative and performing artists, common readers, undergraduates, students, and teachers at all levels. Submissions should relate to Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries and may emphasize either the development of enclaves or specific female subcultures or individual writers who were contemporaneous with Virginia Woolf.

Possible paper and panel themes include:

  • The role of sexuality in the formation of communities of women writers
  • Publication and women writers
  • The Little Magazines and women writers
  • Fashion and women writers
  • The role of the new electronic mediums in the promotion of women writers
  • The rise of women writers and the anti-war movement
  • Suffragism and emerging women writers
  • Psychoanalysis and the advent of women writers
  • War and women writers

In addition to papers clearly focused on Virginia Woolf, we also welcome themes that involve any of the many women writers of the early twentieth-century including (but not limited to) Gertrude Stein, H.D., Dorothy Richardson, Mina Loy, Vera Brittain, Marianne Moore, Jean Rhys, Djuna Barnes, Una Marson, Colette, Mary Butts, Amy Lowell, Rebecca West, Kay Boyle, Bryher, Elizabeth Bowen, and Enid Bagnold.

How to submit your proposal:

For individual papers, send a 250-word proposal. For panels of three or four people, please send a proposal title and a 250-word proposal for each paper. For roundtables and workshops, send a 250 to 500-word proposal and biographical description of each participant. Also, if you would like to chair a panel, please let us know.

High school students and undergraduates will have their own panels and seminars. Graduate students are welcome to submit proposals via the normal conference process.

Email proposal by attachment in word to Julie Vandivere at Woolf2015@bloomu.edu

Proposal deadline: Deadline for proposals is Jan. 24, 2015. NOTE: As of Jan. 25, 2015, the paper proposal deadline was extended to midnight on Jan. 31, 2015.

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IVWS Logo

The International Virginia Woolf Society will have one guaranteed panel at the Modern Language Association convention in 2016.

The IVWS can submit one additional panel, which is usually accepted but not guaranteed. In addition, the group will collaborate with another allied organization still to be identified and submit a third panel.

IVWS members are invited to submit a panel topic for MLA 2016, which will be held in Austin, Texas.

Note that this is a call for panels, not individual paper proposals. Please submit one topic only. To do so, include the following in your submission:

  • A 35-word description (word count includes title), no longer!
  • The name(s) and contact information of the proposed organizer(s).

Submit your panel proposal to IVWS President-Elect Kristin Czarnecki at IVWSociety@gmail.com (note only one “S” in the address), subject line: Woolf MLA Austin 2016.

Deadline for submission: Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014.

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Katherine Mansfield SocietyKatherine Mansfield and the Blooms Berries, an international conference organized by the Katherine Mansfield Society that will be held at the Newberry Library in Chicago, Ill., May 28-30, 2015, has issued a call for papers.

Submit abstracts of 250 words plus a bio-sketch of 50 words to conference organizers, Todd Martin, Erika Baldt, and Alex Moffett. Email to: kmsintheus@gmail.com. Complete panel proposals of three speakers plus a chair, are welcome.

Deadline for abstracts: Oct. 30, 2014.

Get the full details.

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Dr. Ann Martin of the University of Saskatchewan and editor of the fall 2015 issue of the Virginia Woolfvwm Miscellany has issued a call for papers on the theme “Virginia Woolf in the Modern Machine Age.”

The topic is a natural for her, as she has presented papers and published essays on the topic of Woolf’s complicated relationship with the motor car. I was charmed by her paper, “The Lanchester’s Fluid Fly Wheel: Virginia Woolf and British Car Culture,” which she presented at the 23rd Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf.

Call for paper details

The Virginia Woolf Miscellany invites submissions of papers that address the role of everyday machines in the life and/or works of Virginia Woolf. From typewriters and telephones to gramophones and the wireless; from motor-cars and combat aeroplanes to trains and department store elevators; from cameras and film projectors to ranges and hot water tanks, the commonplace technologies of the modern machineage leave their trace on Bloomsbury.

To what extent are these and other machines represented, hidden, implied, avoided, embraced, or questioned by Woolf and her circle and characters? What is the place of labour and mass production, or the role of the handmade or bespoke object, in the context of such technologies and the desires with which they are implicated? What are the ramifications for the individual’s everyday navigation of modernity, domesticity, and/or community? Alternatively, what is the influence of everyday technologies in our own interactions with Woolf and her writings?

Please submit papers of no more than 2500 words to Ann Martin at ann.martin@usask.ca by 31 March 2015.

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The literature of the 1930s is commonly characterized as anti-modernist because of the prevalence of VWM Queering Woolfdocumentary realism, political purpose, and autobiographically-inflected fiction. Moreover, the canonical literature of the decade is almost entirely authored by privileged young men, a phenomenon explored by Virginia Woolf in “The Leaning Tower.”

Interestingly, however, the 1930s bears witness to Woolf’s most daring and most commercially successful novels, The Waves and  The Years respectively.

With this context in mind: how does the “modernist” and “feminist” Woolf align with the common understanding of the decade’s literary figures and their production? And, by extension, does and if
so, how  Woolf’s 1930s writing sheds new light on a decade of literature otherwise dominated by the Auden and Brideshead Generations?

This issue of Virginia Woolf Miscellany, which will be published in Spring 2015, seeks contributions that explore Woolf’s relationship to the canonical literature of the 1930s, such as but not limited to:

Auden’s poetry, Isherwood’s Berlin fiction, Auden’s and Isherwood’s plays, Spender’s commentary, and Waugh’s comedic novels. Equally, this issue also seeks contributions examining resonances among Woolf’s 1930s writing and non-canonical literature of the decade, especially literature written by women.

In addition, this issue encourages responses to the following questions:

  • How does Woolf scholarship, if at all, engage with the critical study of 1930s literature?
  • How does Woolf?s modernism disrupt or complement the critical understanding of 1930s literature?
  • What can Woolf?s late fiction and essays reveal about the 1930s and its literature that the traditional scholarly narrative conceals or overlooks?

Send submissions of no more than 2500 words to: Erica Gene Delsandro ericadelsandro@gmail.com

Deadline for submission: Extended to Sept. 1, 2014

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