Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘events’ Category

I’m all settled in to my spacious and comfy room of my own at Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge.

I took the train up from London a day earlier than necessary for the Literature Cambridge course on Virginia Woolf’s Gardens.

That means we had a bit of time to explore a small parcel of Cambridge, enjoy a lovely tea at Harriets Cafe and Tea Rooms, check in and collect our welcome packets from Trudi Tate and her crew, and — in typical American fashion — load up on some Cambridge swag.

King’s Parade in Cambridge is jammed with tourists, shoppers, and Cambridge folks on Sunday. We were among them.
Trudi Tate and Rosa welcome Bee, a UK student and one of 23 in the Virginia Woolf’s Gardens course at Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge.
Students, including Yuriko, found a table full of Literature Cambridge T-shirts. I bought a red one from Rosa.
Suellen from the U.S. and Hans from the Netherlands take part in a Woolf-related conversation at Literature Cambridge check-in.
Cambridge, Wolfson, and Lit Cambridge T-shirts. I had to have all three.
The Classic Tea at Harrietts Cafe and Tearoom. The house blend is delicious.
View from my room of my own in the Conference Center at Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge.

 

Read Full Post »

Orlando, the stage adaptation by Sarah Rule, will be produced by the Marvellous Machine Theatre Company production, which is part of The Camden Fringe, July 31 through Aug. 4. Performances of Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel are at 7:30 p.m.
Location: Theatro Technis, 26 Crowndale Road, London NW1 1TT (Mornington Crescent tube)
Tickets: £15 (£13 concessions) + £2.50 fee: book online: Book online.

Read Full Post »

Oh, yes, dear readers, today is #DallowayDay! And although celebrations took place last weekend, Virginia Woolf’s 1925 novel and her memorable character Clarissa Dalloway are being feted at celebrations around the world today, the official #DallowayDay, the third Wednesday in June.

If you can’t join a celebration in person, join in via Twitter. Just search #DallowayDay. And consider buying some flowers yourself.

Meanwhile, here are some notable tweets for the day.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js9

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Read Full Post »

“The Salon and the Press” was the title of this fun, lively, and informative afternoon session at the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, with chair Zachary Hacker of St. Ursula Academy.

The panel included:

  • Alive Staveley of Stanford, “Buying and Selling Modernism: The Hogarth Press Order Books”
  • Peter Morgan of Stanford, “Flung into Basements”
  • Julie Daoud and students of Thomas More College, “Voices in Bloom in the 21st Century: Reimagining the Salon’ as Chat-Room’ and Recasting Voices as if Embedded in the Net-Generation.”

Below are Blogging Woolf’s live tweets from the session.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

The Ten Principles

Read Full Post »

It’s been a long day at the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, too long to write about in detail, but here are a few visuals.

Be afraid, says Jenna Nomes De Gruy. Find her on Instagram @virginialovesvita

“An Interdisciplinary Approach to ‘A Room of One’s Own” with Mount St. Joseph University faculty Iris Spoor, Elizabeth Mason, Lisa Wagner Crews, and Kristina Broadbeck. This was just one of a dozen morning breakout sessions.

Ellen Mclaughlin, playwright and author of “Septimus and Clarissa,”  presents “Woolf and Empathy, Her Sly Revolutionary Art” as the last plenary of the day, paying a poetic tribute to her own mother and Virginia Woolf and how she came to read, appreciate, and love the author and learn about her mother.

Read Full Post »

It’s day one of the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, with its theme of social justice, at the University of Mount Saint Joseph in Cincinnati.

Beth Rigel Daugherty, Leslie Hankins and Diane Gillespie presented a panel on “Portraying and Projecting Age, Ageism, and Activism” on day one.

The agenda was full with registration; an opening session; three breakout sessions, each with a choice of six panels ranging from Woolf and race to Queering Woolf; and a plenary session with Dr. Elizabeth Abel of UC Berkeley on “The Smashed Mosaic: Virginia Woolf and African American Modernism.”

The day ended with “Hours in a Library,” a wine and cheese reception at the Mercantile Library in downtown Cincinnati, where conference participants met and mingled among the books.

Take a look at the place where readers, writers, and thinkers have gathered since 1835.

Read Full Post »

What: Exhibition: Publishing Modernist Fiction and Poetry
Where: Senate House University Library, Malet St, London WC1E 7HU (Room 101, 1st Floor)
When: 17 – 28 June 2019

Senate House Library holds little-known materials on modernist writers such as Virginia Woolf, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Nancy Cunard and Djuna Barnes. Their experimental texts were published by small presses and little magazines, but also attracted the attention of larger commercial book publishers. To gain greater control over the publication process, Woolf, Stein, Cunard and others created their own presses and engaged closely with the physical materiality of books.

To mark the release of the edited collection Publishing Modernist Fiction and Poetry (Edinburgh University Press, 2019), this exhibition focuses on these fascinating modernist publishers that opened new markets for fiction and poetry. From a mass of little-seen materials in Senate House Special Collections, Leila Kassir and Lise Jaillant have selected books, periodicals, correspondence and ephemera relating to three themes:

  1. Women and Publishing;
  2. Race and Modernism;
  3. Middlebrow and Celebrity.

Among the items on display are letters by Virginia and Leonard Woolf, rare editions published by Nancy Cunard’s Hours Press, neglected periodicals and publicity materials. Short videos by experts of modernism contextualise the exhibition and the material context in which the new literature first appeared.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: