Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘feminism’ Category

Due to the high level of interest in the inaugural issue of Feminist Modernist Studies (1:1-2), Routledge has provided free access to the entire first issue for the month of January, according to Editor Cassandra Laity of the University of Tennessee.

Short essays in the volume examine the state of and future of feminist modernist studies in global women writers, “intermodernism,” African-American and queer studies.

Longer essays explore transgender and Vita Sackville West; refugees in Olive Moore; feminist modernism in the worlds of fashion, WWII union organizing, psychoanalysis, sculpture, dance, Afro-Caribbean crossings, and much more.

Get full free access.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

to the lighthouseI first read Virginia Woolf as a college junior. I started with Mrs. Dalloway for a class and moved on to The Years on my own. My love for Woolf was immediate, but I knew my readings were only scratching the surface.

Over the years, I dipped into more Woolf — To the Lighthouse, A Room of One’s Own, Orlando — all just for fun. It wasn’t until I enrolled in a master’s program and made Woolf my focus that I truly took an in-depth approach to her and her writing.

But that doesn’t mean Woolf can’t be instructive for the common reader, as evidenced by my own experiences and those indicated by three recent pieces I found online. An article in Bustle, “18 Books Every Woman Should Read When She’s 18 (Because I Sure Wish I Had),” argues that every 18-year-old woman should read To the Lighthouse. And in Sydney’s Daily Life piece, “The Truth About Feminism,” Annabel Crabb cites A Room of One’s Own as an explicitly feminist piece she read as an 18-year-old, while a current-day college students cites the book as a feminist classic as well.

Read Full Post »

Did Virginia Woolf identify as a feminist? That was one of the questions I raised in a paper I presented at the 24th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, which will be included in the Selected Papers from the conference, published in May 2015.

So imagine my satisfaction when during a visit to my local library, I spotted Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own (1929) smack in the middle of a section of feminist standards, sandwiched between Steinem and Ensler.

No surprise there. Room is a feminist classic mentioned daily in writing both personal and public. It also appears regularly on lists of books everyone must read and lists of books that have changed the world. It’s mentioned in stories about life-changing books. And it has inspired a women-centered foundation and provided the name for bookstores.

But I doubt Woolf had any inkling that would be the case 73 years after her death.

AROOO on bookshelf

Woolf’s “A Room of One’s Own” is the skinny white-spined volume tenth from the left.

 

Read Full Post »

51stories

Comedy as a vehicle to illuminate gender inequity: I think Virginia Woolf would have approved.  In her article (Heard the one about how the web put the spark back into feminism?)  in today’s Observer Anna Holmes reflects on the influence of Jezebel (an online feminist magazine) when it pioneered a new wit in women’s journalism.  Yes, I’m sure that  Virginia Woolf would have approved.  After all she wrote one of the first feminist tracts ‘A room of one’s own‘, which I have just read again.

It’s a brilliantly written early feminist text, in which Woolf argues that what a woman (writer) needs is a room of her own and £500 a year annual income (she wrote this in 1928 – I don’t think we’d get very far on 500 nowadays).  The gist is clear: the reason why there have been so very few women writers, painters…

View original post 314 more words

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: