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Archive for the ‘International Virginia Woolf Society’ Category

This is the third in a new series of posts that will offer a global perspective on Woolf studies, as proposed by Stefano Rozzoni at the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf. If you would like to contribute to this series, please contact Blogging Woolf at bloggingwoolf@yahoo.com.

The road to Cincinnati is not long or arduous if you are starting out from downtown Toronto. In fact, it’s nearly a straight shot: taking the 401 West and crossing into the US at Windsor, the I75 South will lead you to your destination after eight or nine hours. I know this because it is the route I took to Woolf and Social Justice: The 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, which was held at Mount St. Joseph University this past June.

Speeding towards any other conference, this long and unchallenging trek of highway might have provided an extended opportunity for me, a fourth-year PhD candidate, to stress over the paper I’d be delivering, and the many people I would soon need to meet (and impress). This was not my travel experience to this conference, however.

How come? The answer to that question begins with my acceptance into the conference program last February, and explains a good deal about the hearty welcome I received from all in Cincinnati.

There was, most welcome of all, a summoning together…

Shortly after sending word that I would indeed be presenting, conference organiser Drew Shannon (MSJ) contacted me personally via Facebook Messenger to ask if I had any questions or concerns about the coming gathering.

An enthusiastic first-time conference-goer hopes that his T-shirt will gain him entry to the Woolfians’ inner circles.

Over the course of our chat, I found myself provided not simply with logistical answers, but with a good idea of the Woolfians I would meet there (Jean Moorcroft Wilson! Cecil Woolf!), and anecdotes about Drew having enjoyed a London breakfast at their table—the same one that Woolf herself had used to set the Hogarth Press edition of Eliot’s The Waste Land.

I can’t say that I have ever been personally contacted by a conference organiser, and I had certainly never had one welcome me into the fold so enthusiastically. This, I’ve since gathered, was something that Drew did time and again in the months preceding our in-person meeting. The effort he exerted to make us first-timers feel welcomed (before, during, and after the conference) is to be commended, and, I would suggest, imitated by those in a similar position who dare try.

“All hope abandon, ye who enter here” (Dante), as seen on the entry to the stacks at Cincinnati’s Mercantile Library

As fate would have it, Cecil’s final illness prevented him and Jean from attending the conference, and, as I recently remarked to another Woolfian, the couple’s absence had a marked presence on the goings-on that was perceptible even to a first-time Woolf-goer like myself. I like to think that this was possible because of the excellent scholarship and better fellowship on offer at the IVWS’ historical conferences, the latest incarnation of which I experienced first-hand at VW29.

For example, a blending of the scholarly and the social was to be found at the ‘world premiere’ of Leonard Woolf’s closet drama The Hotel, which can safely be classified as a conference-wide effortWhile it was acted in MSJ’s large auditorium by Drew’s infamous Woolfpack, the performance’s numerous fourth-wall breaks and plentiful helping of cheek saw the whole audience participating in the evening’s entertainment.

Similarly, the wine and cheese reception at the city’s historic Mercantile Library is not an event whose rich setting and intimate conversation I will soon forget. Nor will I forget the successive evenings where conference attendees gathered in MSJ’s dorms to sip boxed wine, eat stale pizza, and discuss all things Woolf-related (and a few that were not).

Papers given on all kinds of books, hesitating at no subject however trivial or however vast…

The bard gazes (with contempt?) at a bookshelf asking who composed his life’s works, Mercantile Library

On the academic side of the equation, my interest as a scholar of the Great War was piqued by the panels on Woolf’s pacifism and war-legacies, and by my co-presenters in “Woolf, War, and Social Justice”: Charlotte Fiehn (Texas) and Chelsie Hoskins (Miami).

But variety was the name of the day (or week). For example, I attended M. Rita D. Viana’s (Universidade Federale de Santa Catarina) paper on differing translations of Orlando into Brazilian Portuguese. This small panel, which also included Scott Stalcup (Northern Illinois), initiated a discussion I found irresistible, despite the fact that I know no Portuguese and had never read Orlando (an oversight that I have since remedied).

The plenary talk on Woolf in the era of #MeToo meanwhile made an excellent argument for grounding transformative justice in storytelling, while panels throughout the week did not shy away from highlighting Woolf’s own race- and class-inflected blind spots when otherwise praising her activist writing.

By getting to know the group that had shared 28 such experiences (more or less) with Jean and Cecil, over the course of VW29 I gradually came to understand why they were so affected by the couple’s absence.

For it was the middle of June. The conference was over…

The author’s first GIF: MSJ’s gargantuan flag flying proudly on a quiet June night

Finally, for all that the people Drew gathered may have had in common, and even in light of their long shared history together, it cannot be said that they were a uniform crowd. Participants ranged in experience from senior undergraduates to retired faculty, with a healthy sampling from every stage in between (and an especially robust helping of graduate students).

What’s more, these participants came to Cincinnati from the world over—I have fond memories of sharing an American buffet-breakfast with two Brits, an Indian dinner with Brazilians, a meditation on MSJ’s massive American flag with an Irishwoman, and a number of similarly memorable conversations with Americans (and Canadians!) who might have started their weeks anywhere from coast to coast to coast. Variety indeed!

As I wound my way back to Ontario, this time driving north-east around Lake Erie, I found myself once more with time for reflection. I had learned quite a bit at Woolf and Social Justice, made some friends (“networked”), and had an unforgettable experience to boot. While it may not be practical or even possible for me to attend this conference’s successors every single year, I’m certain that I’ll find my way back amongst this group before too long, whatever winding road it may be that takes me there.

The only picture the author managed to take of himself at VW29, replete with a thumb in the upper-left corner.

Sean A. McPhail is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. His research (primarily) concerns the relationship between kinship and commemoration in the war-writings of Siegfried Sassoon.

Read more in the series:

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Stefano Rozzoni

As is customary at Woolf conferences, scholars from all over the world traveled to the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati, Ohio, adding a global perspective to Woolf studies.

Going global

Blogging Woolf snapped photos of some of these scholars at the June 6-9 event. And we share them here as we introduce an upcoming new series of posts.

The brainchild of Stefano Rizzoni, a doctoral student at the University of Bergamo in Italy, the proposed global series will answer questions like these:

  • What are Woolf conferences like? And how do they enhance a spirit of internationalism and community?
  • How do conferences enrich one’s work, vision and knowledge of Woolf and others?
  • How does one’s native country responds to Virginia Woolf studies?

If you would like to contribute to this series, please contact Blogging Woolf at bloggingwoolf@yahoo.com

Joshua Phillips of Scotland, Briany Armstrong and James Kearns of the UK, Jiwon Choi of China, and Maria Oliveira of Brazil.

Sayaka Okumura and Miyuki Tateishi of Japan

Victoria Callanan of Sweden and Maria Viana of Brazil

Anne Marie Bantzinger of the Netherlands

Cecilia Servatius of Austria

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The International Virginia Woolf Society is once again running the Angelica Garnett Undergraduate Essay Contest/Prize in honor of Virginia Woolf and in memory of Angelica Garnett, writer, artist, and daughter of Woolf’s sister, Vanessa Bell.

The contest is open to any undergraduate as well as anyone within one year of completing the undergraduate degree.

Essay parameters

Essays can be on any topic pertaining to Woolf’s writings. Essays should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words in length, including notes and works cited, with an original title of the entrant’s choosing

Essays should be submitted with the application by June 30 and will be read and judged by the four IVWS officers: Ann Martin, Alice Keane, Drew Shannon, and President Kristen Czarnecki.

The winner will receive $200, and the winning essay will be published in the following issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany.

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The deadline is extended to Sept. 30 for the call for papers for an upcoming issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany focused on “Collecting Woolf.” Get the details.

In addition to more formal academic essays, the issue will collaborate with Blogging Woolf to feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.”

Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf?s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself.

If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,000 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 30, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

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Halle Mason is the winner of the Angelica Garnett Essay Prize with a paper that focuses on the Gothic, according to the fall issue of the International Virginia Woolf Newsletter.

Her essay, “A Modern Gothic: Septimus Smith Haunts the Streets of Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway,” was written for Professor Emily James’s fourth-year course on The Metropolitan Mind at the University of St. Thomas.

Mason will receive $200 and her paper will be published in Issue 92 of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany.

The essay was one of a number of excellent entries for the Garnett prize, but stood out for the readers as “an original, layered, and well informed” engagement with Woolf’s 1925 novel. In particular, the essay was noted for the author’s skilled application of literary terminology and genre theory.

Drawing upon a breadth of knowledge, the author establishes the gothic nature of the “horrors of the everyday” in a postwar context.

Working from “Street Haunting,” she moves to detailed analyses of Mrs. Dalloway, creating a memorable, persuasive, and insightful argument. – IVWS Newsletter

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The new issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany is now online. This  double issue includes Spring vwm89and90-final-page-12016, Issue 89 and the Fall 2016, Issue 90.

The first is a truly miscellaneous collection of essays edited by Diana L. Swanson, and the second features the special topic Virginia Woolf and Illness, curated by guest editor Cheryl Hindrichs.

Download the issue as a PDF.

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Modern Language Association 2018, scheduled for Jan. 4-7 in New York City, will include Virginia top_mla_logoWoolf.

The International Virginia Woolf Society will have one guaranteed panel. The organization can also submit one additional panel, which is often accepted but not guaranteed. In addition, the group will collaborate with another allied organization and submit a third panel.

Submission guidelines

Members of the MLA and the IVWS are invited to submit one panel topic — not an individual paper proposal — for MLA 2018. The proposal should include the following:

  • A maximum 35-word description of the panel. The word count includes the title.
  • The name(s) and contact information of the proposed organizer(s).

Please submit your proposal via email to Christine Czarnecki, president of the IVWS at Kristin_Czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu. Use the subject line: Woolf MLA 2018.

Deadline for submission: Nov. 14, 2016.

Once the proposals are in, Czarnecki will send them out to the IVWS membership for a vote. If you wish to propose your own special session outside of the IVWS process, please visit the MLA website for more details.

A special Woolf gathering

Members interested in attending the traditional IVWS gathering at the MLA—a dinner to be held either Friday, Jan. 6, 2018, or Saturday, Jan. 7, 2018, should contact Czarnecki so she can consider that when making the booking.

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