Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Travels with Virginia Woolf’ Category

Peter and Jill Seddon, two retired academics from Brighton University, replicated as exactly as possible a trip made by Leonard and Virginia Woolf in the spring of 1928 to Cassis and back. You can follow along with them on Instagram.

The purpose of the Woolfs’ trip was to visit Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant at their house, La Bergere, on the Fontcreuze Estate near Cassis.

Peter, a researcher, artist and intervention artist, and Jill, a pioneer and innovator in design history, posted images and commentary about their 2018 trip each day. You can find their photos on Instagram at @followingthewoolfs

Meanwhile, here are two of the first posts the couple posted, along with a later one. The first two are tagged #followingthewoolfs.

Nobody shall say of me that I have not known perfect happiness. -Virginia Woolf on her first trip to Cassis in 1925.

 

View this post on Instagram

One of four pieces of furniture painted by Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant in Cassis and collected by Jerome Hill, the founder of the Camargo Foundation. (1930s?)These four pieces are now in a corridor in the Foundation building since they are considered too frail for use in the other rooms. This example echos much of such work in Carleston House and work they undertook for the Omega Workshops established by Roger Fry. For those unfamilar with it, the Camargo Foundation supports residencies for artists, dancers, film makers, creative writers, as well as residencies for scholars in the humanities working on Francophone projects. #leonardwoolf #virginiawoolfquotes #virginiawoolf #pallenthousegallery #townergallery #pheonixgallerybrighton #brightonmuseumsndartgallery #camargofoundation #charlestontrust #monkshousent #kingscollegearchives

A post shared by Peter & Jill Seddon (@followingthewoolfs) on

Read Full Post »

Woolfians from around the world are converging on Canterbury, England this week for the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf with its theme of Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace.

“[E]ven compared with Florence and Venice there is no lovelier place in the world than Canterbury,” Woolf wrote.

Play along as we track Virginia Woolf’s journey to the conference. Then stay tuned for more. #travelswithvirginiawoolf

4FCF0C74-DC72-43FC-9614-AF31B0CADE62

Virginia Woolf travels by train from London’s St. Pancras station to Canterbury.

Woolf at Kent

Virginia admires the brochure for the University of Kent’s Woolf College, which is named after her.

Virginia grounds herself in the words of Geoffrey Chaucer as she visits the bronze statue dedicated to him two years ago along Canterbury’s High Street.

Read Full Post »

Chiara Ferretti, an Italian fan of Virginia Woolf, sent Blogging Woolf this photo of a Woolf sighting she made in Venice. She found the Woolf poster at the Calle del Perdon, San Polo.

Woolf herself visited Venice three times — in 1904 with her family, in 1912 on her honeymoon with Leonard, and in 1932 with Leonard, Roger Fry and Margery Fry. On her 1904 trip, she stayed at the Grand Hotel on the Grand Canal.

On the occasion of her first visit, she wrote this in a 4 April 1904 letter to Violet Dickinson:

There never was such an amusing and beautiful place. We have a room here right at the top just at the side of the Grand Canal . . I can’t believe it is a real place yet and I wander about open-mouthed

For more on Woolf’s travels, visit In Her Steps and check out Travels with Virginia Woolf (1993) by Jan Morris.

img_0191

Read Full Post »

Virginia Woolf is on the move — and she is posting her travel pics on Instagram and Twitter.

Last month she visited Greece, stopping off in Athens and Santorini. She toured Athens by bus, revisited the Acropolis on foot, was a guest at a Greek wedding on Santorini and spent some time near the water.

This month she is headed to the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Woolf and Heritage at Leeds Trinity University in Leeds, England. If you’re going, too, and tweeting about your trip, use the conference hashtag #Woolf2016. Virginia will also be stopping off in London. And she may take some detours along the way.

You can follow her travels on Twitter by searching #travelswithvirginiawoolf. Meanwhile, here are her collected tweets from her trip to Greece.

Read Full Post »

Kathleen Dixon Donnelly, blogger at Such Friends, organized a customized, three-day Virginia Woolf trip for two American visitors last year and is willing to do it again — or a similar trip — for those with a literary jaunt on their wish list.

18245550063_8b35706f17_o

Kathleen Dixon Donnelly (right) of Such Friends stopped off in Ohio to visit Blogging Woolf last summer. We met for lunch at an iconic Akron restaurant, Bob’s Hamburg.

The trip through Sussex and Kent involved visits to:

  • Sissinghurst Castle, once owned by Virginia’s friend and lover, Vita Sackville-West,
  • Monk’s House, where Virginia and Leonard lived for many years, and
  • Charleston farmhouse, where Virginia’s sister, painter Vanessa Bell hosted the Bloomsbury group.

Feedback from her guided travelers included this quote:

Kathleen was a wonderfully competent guide who made sure that every aspect of the trip was beautifully organized but also allowed for the serendipitous surprises that made our trip so special. We thoroughly enjoyed her company and hope to join her and Tony (her charming husband, and gallant driver) for another adventure in the future.

Dixon-Donnelly has also put together an audio walking tour of the Bloomsbury section of London, which is available from VoiceMap at Bloomsbury Group audio walking tour.  

If you’re going to be in London, you can download it to your mobile and her voice will guide you through the streets using GPS and VoiceMap’s software.

This year, Dixon-Donnelly may also plan a literary walking tour of Paris.

To learn more about her tours, email her at kaydee@gypsyteacher.com.

Read Full Post »

Editor’s Note: Westrow Cooper, who will lead the Mrs. Dalloway walking tour London Sign Postnext Thursday evening, contributed this post.

It was a bright June morning when Mrs Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself. Setting off in her footsteps on a dark November evening may therefore seem a little perverse. But, after all, how many bright spring mornings can one count on in England? And when is not a good time to walk and talk about Mrs Dalloway?

So if you’re in London next Thursday evening, 26th November, come and do a bit of night walking, through a city getting ready for a party, in the footsteps of Mrs Dalloway and Virginia Woolf.

‘Mrs Dalloway said she would buy the flowers herself.’ But even as she steps out into the clamour and commotion of the street, the squeak of the hinges casts her mind back to her youth and the fateful summer at Bourton when she stood ‘on the theshold of her adult life.’ Just as the past is always present in the fabric of the city, so our own past reverberates throughout our lives as individuals.

Westminster, St James’s, Piccadilly, Bond Street, Oxford Street, Harley Street, Fitzrovia and then across to the famous squares of Bloomsbury. This walk takes us through the historic centre of the dynamic metropolis, brought to life on the page so vividly in Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece.

Few books convey the sheer wonder, the miracle of being alive, here, now and in the city as vividly as Mrs Dalloway. This walk, in the footsteps of Mrs Dalloway and Virginia Woolf, provides the opportunity to immerse ourselves in the city and the novel. To immerse ourselves in a London busy, crowded and lit up for Christmas; a London, in other words, getting ready for a party.

As Virginia Woolf wrote in her essay Oxford Street Tide – ‘The charm of modern London is that it is not built to last; it is built to pass.’

Meet at 6 p.m. outside Westminster Abbey Gift Shop. Details and booking here: https://goo.gl/odXuxG

Read Full Post »

On Twitter yesterday, I discovered a World War I mystery featuring Virginia Woolf, a paperback copy of my first Mrs. Dalloway for sale, and a Twitter user, @the__waveswho is doing something unique — posting a line from The Waves each day.

You can scroll down to see all three — and at the end of your scroll you’ll see the lovely Virginia Woolf’s English Hours by Peter Tolhurst, which I received from Black Dog Books (mistakenly identified as Black Dog Press in my tweet) just last Friday. Review to come.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: