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Archive for the ‘Virginia Woolf Miscellany’ Category

Here is a call for papers for a special topics issue (#92, Fall 2017) of the Virginia Woolf vw miscellany summer 15Miscellany on Woolf and Indigenous Literatures:

Virginia Woolf and Indigenous Literatures

This issue of VWM seeks essays that consider Woolf’s oeuvre in dialogue with works by Native American, First Nations, Australian, and New Zealander authors, among others.

  • What kind of dialogic emerges when placing Woolf’s writings alongside those of indigenous writers?
  • How might indigenous literatures enhance interpretations of Woolf’s modernist, feminist, and pacifist poetics?
  • How might such comparisons affect or inform understandings of subjectivity in women’s lives and literature, and the interconnections between narrative innovation and socio-political activism?
  • Does Woolf’s ecological vision align with those of indigenous writers responding to threats of global destruction and mass extinctions?
  • Could such comparative and intersectional work chip away at the boundaries still often imposed upon literary studies—the “West” versus the “Rest”?
  • Other approaches are welcome.

How to Submit: Please send submissions of no more than 2,500 words, including notes and works cited, in the latest version of Word to: Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu.

Submission Deadline: March 31, 2017.

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The new issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany is now online. This  double issue includes Spring vwm89and90-final-page-12016, Issue 89 and the Fall 2016, Issue 90.

The first is a truly miscellaneous collection of essays edited by Diana L. Swanson, and the second features the special topic Virginia Woolf and Illness, curated by guest editor Cheryl Hindrichs.

Download the issue as a PDF.

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The latest issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, Fall 2015/Winter 2016, Issue 88 is now available vwm88fall2015spring2016-cover1online, according to Vara Neverow, managing editor of the publication, which is published by the International Virginia Woolf Society.

Ann Martin, guest editor, has focused the issue on the special topic of “Virginia Woolf in the Modern Machine Age.” The special topic section of the issue includes eight essays and a poem.

The issue includes information about the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf (there’s still time to register!) and also includes the Call for Papers for the Second Annual Angelica Garnett Undergraduate Essay Prize ($200 and publication in the subsequent issue of the VWM).

The “Truly Miscellaneous” section of the issue features three contributions, one of which is a poem. The issue also includes calls for papers (including CFPs for future issues of the Miscellany), seven book reviews, the International Virginia Woolf Society column, and two generously discounted offers for published collections of essays on Virginia Woolf.

The print version will be available shortly.

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The electronic version of Spring/Summer 2015 Virginia Woolf Miscellany is now available to view online or download and vw miscellany summer 15print, says Editor Vara Neverow.

Edited and with an introduction by Erica Delsandro, the issue includes fascinating essays on Woolf in the context of the 1930s, diverse articles and a review of the performance of Septimus and Clarissa from the Twenty Fifth Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf. A section of the issue is also devoted to heartfelt remembrances of Shari Benstock and Jane Marcus.

The issue also includes seven book reviews, important information about upcoming Woolf conferences, and information about various Woolf societies. The issue, as always, concludes with the Society Column, written this time by the International Virginia Woolf Society’s President, Kristin Czarnecki.

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Virginia Woolf Miscellany Winter 2015The most recent issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, Fall 2014/Winter 2015 is now online.

This special issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, edited by Kathryn Simpson and Melinda Harvey, focuses on Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield — a perfect complement to this year’s Woolf conference, the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries.

Contributors are Hilary Newman, Patricia Moran, Susan Reid, Emily Hinnov, Maria J. Lopez & Gerardo Rodríguez Salas, Rose Onans, Alda Correia and Sandra Inskeep-Fox.

According to Vara Neverow, managing editor, the issue also features “truly miscellaneous” contributions including a woodcut of Virginia Woolf by Loren Kantor and essays by Xiaoqin Cao, Steve Ui-chun Yang, Anne Byrne, Daniel Jordon Varon and Erin M. Kingsley.

Book reviewers are Jane Fisher, Wayne Chapman, Ryan Weberling, Bonnie Kime Scott, Steve Ferebee, Maggie Humm and Peter Stansky.

The issue also includes detailed calls for papers for future issues of the Miscellany and a discount form for ordering the Selected Papers from the 24th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Writing the World in 2014.

Print copies of the issue will be mailed to subscribers and current members of the International Virginia Woolf Society in the near future.

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Dr. Ann Martin of the University of Saskatchewan and editor of the fall 2015 issue of the Virginia Woolfvwm Miscellany has issued a call for papers on the theme “Virginia Woolf in the Modern Machine Age.”

The topic is a natural for her, as she has presented papers and published essays on the topic of Woolf’s complicated relationship with the motor car. I was charmed by her paper, “The Lanchester’s Fluid Fly Wheel: Virginia Woolf and British Car Culture,” which she presented at the 23rd Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf.

Call for paper details

The Virginia Woolf Miscellany invites submissions of papers that address the role of everyday machines in the life and/or works of Virginia Woolf. From typewriters and telephones to gramophones and the wireless; from motor-cars and combat aeroplanes to trains and department store elevators; from cameras and film projectors to ranges and hot water tanks, the commonplace technologies of the modern machineage leave their trace on Bloomsbury.

To what extent are these and other machines represented, hidden, implied, avoided, embraced, or questioned by Woolf and her circle and characters? What is the place of labour and mass production, or the role of the handmade or bespoke object, in the context of such technologies and the desires with which they are implicated? What are the ramifications for the individual’s everyday navigation of modernity, domesticity, and/or community? Alternatively, what is the influence of everyday technologies in our own interactions with Woolf and her writings?

Please submit papers of no more than 2500 words to Ann Martin at ann.martin@usask.ca by 31 March 2015.

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The literature of the 1930s is commonly characterized as anti-modernist because of the prevalence of VWM Queering Woolfdocumentary realism, political purpose, and autobiographically-inflected fiction. Moreover, the canonical literature of the decade is almost entirely authored by privileged young men, a phenomenon explored by Virginia Woolf in “The Leaning Tower.”

Interestingly, however, the 1930s bears witness to Woolf’s most daring and most commercially successful novels, The Waves and  The Years respectively.

With this context in mind: how does the “modernist” and “feminist” Woolf align with the common understanding of the decade’s literary figures and their production? And, by extension, does and if
so, how  Woolf’s 1930s writing sheds new light on a decade of literature otherwise dominated by the Auden and Brideshead Generations?

This issue of Virginia Woolf Miscellany, which will be published in Spring 2015, seeks contributions that explore Woolf’s relationship to the canonical literature of the 1930s, such as but not limited to:

Auden’s poetry, Isherwood’s Berlin fiction, Auden’s and Isherwood’s plays, Spender’s commentary, and Waugh’s comedic novels. Equally, this issue also seeks contributions examining resonances among Woolf’s 1930s writing and non-canonical literature of the decade, especially literature written by women.

In addition, this issue encourages responses to the following questions:

  • How does Woolf scholarship, if at all, engage with the critical study of 1930s literature?
  • How does Woolf?s modernism disrupt or complement the critical understanding of 1930s literature?
  • What can Woolf?s late fiction and essays reveal about the 1930s and its literature that the traditional scholarly narrative conceals or overlooks?

Send submissions of no more than 2500 words to: Erica Gene Delsandro ericadelsandro@gmail.com

Deadline for submission: Extended to Sept. 1, 2014

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