Archive for the ‘Virginia Woolf’ Category

Sunday, Oct. 16, marks the centenary of the arrival at Charleston of Vanessa Bell, DuncanCharleston Grant and David ‘Bunny’ Garnett. In honor of that, the National Trust property has programs and activities planned for this weekend, as well as into the new year.

They include everything from “Your Country or Your Conscience,” a pacifist theater performance by White Feathers Theatre, to tours of usually unseen parts of the farmhouse ,to art workshops.

The cafe will even have a special menu inspired by the Charleston Garden and The Bloomsbury Cookbook.

Get more details and booking information.

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Editor’s Note: This post is reblogged from The Charleston Attic

As Charleston looks forward to a weekend of Centenary celebrations, ‘The Attic’ is being specially prepared to open its doors for visitors this Sunday 16 October. Rarely on show to the public, the space, accessed by narrow, steep stairs at the top of the farmhouse was once Vanessa Bells’ studio and now stores Charleston’s extensive archive collection and works of art.  

My first blog post as Charleston’s ‘Attic intern’ showcases some of Duncan Grant’s book illustrations and book jacket designs from the 1960s. Newly catalogued from the Angelica Garnett Gift is a collection of Duncan Grant’s correspondence regarding his illustrations for a previously undiscovered short story by Virginia Woolf featuring ‘Nurse Lugton’ and a book jacket design for a novel by Margaret Lane called A smell of burning.  

Source: Book illustrations and jacket designs by Duncan Grant | The Charleston Attic

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After having an essay published last year in Spry Literary Journal, I was invited to contribute to abcsSpry’s ABC series. Writing for Beginners and Fiction Writing would be followed by the ABCs of Creative Nonfiction, and I could write on the letter of my choice.

I quickly claimed the letter “M” with its myriad manifestations–memoir, memory, motivation, and metaphor, to name just a few. And what about mentors and muses? I’d written a chapter, “A Muse of One’s Own,” for the 2014 book Writing after Retirement(yes, of course I spotlight Virginia Woolf!)–so I adapted it for this project.

Editor’s Note: You can finish reading this post on Alice’s blog: ABCs of Creative Nonfiction | Alice Lowe blogs … about writing & reading & Virginia Woolf

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Well no, but they do hang out together in a novel, along with Sylvia Plath, Paul Auster, Margaret Atwood, W.B. Yeats, and others. It’s Lexicon by Max Barry. “A cerebral thriller,” according to one blurb; “dark and twisted and sweet and humane all at once,” says another.

It starts with two guys grabbing a man named Wil in an airport bathroom and putting a needle in his eye to extract memories and lethal words. And they have to hurry or Wolf will get him first.

On page 46—at last!—one of the guys, Tom, explains that they’re called poets because they’re good with words. They’re quick and smart and persuasive, and when their raw potential is detected, they’re recruited from all over and sent to a special school to learn how to manipulate minds with secret words. Only the best will graduate and be given their names. Wolf is a poet, Wolf who turns out to be Woolf. “Virginia Woolf is trying to kill me?” asks Wil. “Among others. But Woolf is the one to worry about,” replies Tom, who turns out to be Eliot.

It takes a long time to separate the good guys from the bad, and then you got it wrong, or maybe not, and you’re still not sure. Did Woolf kill everyone in an Australian town? Which side is Tom on? Why is Charlotte driving a transport truck straight at them? Where does Wil fit in–he’s not Shakespeare, not a poet. And why am I reading this bizarre novel?

If I wondered to what lengths I’d go to chase down Woolf sightings in contemporary fiction, now I know. If I wondered to what lengths I’d go to make it up to Paula for not posting as often as I should on Blogging Woolf, now I know. The violence was off-putting, and I wasn’t sure I wanted to keep reading; then I was hooked. People being murdered at close range on one page, thought-provoking gems about the power of language on another. And Woolf.

That’s what I never figured out—why Woolf? All the rest are actual poets or at least, like Bronte and Atwood, have written poetry as well as prose. Max Barry has a Q&A feature on his website, and I asked him about this, but I haven’t gotten a response—I’ll let you know if I do.

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Two attendees, including model Cara Delevigne, pose with copies of Orlando (image via Elle.com).

Burberry’s newest fall collection was inspired by Woolf’s novel Orlando, and the author’s presence was undeniable at the launch of the collection at London Fashion Week.

The luxury British fashion brand held a runway show last week which channeled the historical, fantastic, and androgynous aspects of Orlando, and, as Elle.com states, “pushed further into the future by showing a collection that was almost entirely unisex—and giving the entire cast the same makeup look, regardless of gender.”

Many famous fashion editors, models, and celebrities attended the launch of the collection at “Makers House,” which Fiona Sinclair Scott at CNN Style describes as, “an old bookshop in London’s Soho area” which was transformed into a space where people could “watch the show and explore an exhibition of artisans and craftspeople — including saddlers, embroiderers, scentmakers and bookbinders.”


A few looks from Burberry’s Orlando inspired collection (image from the Los Angeles Times).

Writer Fiona Sinclair Scott, who attended the event and documented it on Instagram, wrote this about the show and about Christopher Bailey, the Chief Creative Officer and CEO of Burberry:

A copy of ‘Orlando’ by Virginia Woolf was left for each guest on the pale pink fabric-covered benches. Widely regarded as one of Woolf’s more popular and accessible reads, the novel’s protagonist is born into the body of a man but later transforms into a woman, living some 300 years into modern times. Neither time nor gender could stop Woolf’s story and it seems the same now applies to Bailey.


A copy of Orlando was given to each guest (information and photo from Fiona Sinclair Scott at Instagram).

On Wednesday, September 21st, Burberry  hosted a live reading of Woolf’s Orlando which included such celebrities as British actor Jacob Fortune-Lloyd, Dame Eileen Atkins, and Dame Sian Phillips:


Dame Sian Phillips reading from chapter one of Woolf’s Orlando at Burberry’s “Maker’s House” (image from Pin Drop at Twitter).

You can watch the entire 2016 Burberry show on YouTube (see below), or you can view the collection at uk.burberry.com.

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Allen Fulghum of New York University has won the 2015-16 Angelica Garnett Undergraduate Essay PrizeEssay VW Miscellany Sept. 2016, according to the September issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, edited by Ann Martin.

His paper, “Feeling the Glory, Feeling the Lack: Virginia Woolf, Terrence Malick and the Soldier’s Sublime,” was written for Professor Patrick Deer’s “Understanding Modern War Culture” course. The paper focused on a sophisticated reading of Mrs. Dalloway and the 1998 film, The Thin Red Line.

The essay will be published in a forthcoming issue of Virginia Woolf Miscellany, the publication of the International Virginia Woolf Society, which sponsored the competition.

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Which is the greater ecstasy?  The man’s or the woman’s? And are they not perhaps the same?”  – Virginia Woolf, Orlando

Following the very successful performance of “Intolerance” at Onassis Cultural Centre, Io Voulgaraki is now adapting and directing Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece Orlando, starring Amalia Kavali, with support from the British Council.

orlando-3According to publicity materials: “This performance shows us Orlando in the present, in her “here” and “now” just before her end. In such a time, she tells us of the greatest moments of her life in her ultimate endeavor to achieve human contact. Through the process of recollection, she faces her most extreme experiences, at times earthly and natural and at others transcendental. She begins her narration from the start, as we always do when facing death or the unknown.”

The performance is in Greek, in a new translation by Dr. Niketas Siniossoglou.

The company expects to travel and perform in the UK later next year. “At least we would all love to visit and perform in the Woolfian birthplace and will do our best to achieve it,” wrote actress Amalia Kavali in an email to Blogging Woolf.

Opening: Sept. 30 through Dec. 4
Dates & times: Friday – Saturday – Sunday at 21:00
Running Time: 70 minutes
Tickets: 12 € general admission, 8 € concessions
Address: Skrow Theater, 5 Arhellaou Street, Pagrati, Athens, Greece
Reservations: 210 7235 842  (11:00 a.m – 14:00 p.m. and 17:00 p.m. – 20:30 p.m.)

Contact: Maria Tsolaki | 6974 76 78 90, 210 76 27 966 | mtsolaki@gmail.com

Translation: Niketas Siniossoglou
Adaptation – Direction: Io Voulgaraki
Stage and Costume design: Magdalene Avgerinou
Stage Lighting: Karol Jarek
Hair designer: Alex Scissors
Make-up designer: Marina Stat
Programme & Poster Photographs by: Kiki Papadopoulou
Teaser-Trailer: Sebastian Fragopoulos
Performer: Amalia Kavali

Download the flyer, which appears on Page 63 of the current issue of the magazine, Greece is at http://www.greece-is.com/greece-is-democracy-2016/.


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