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Archive for the ‘Woolf and war’ Category

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A photograph of Hitler’s “Black Book,” or “hit-list.”

The DailyMail.co.uk is reporting that historians have “digitized the first full English translation” of Adolf Hitler’s “Black Book,” which contained the names of many British figures whom he planned to have arrested (or killed) if Germany were to take over Britain.

Although there were once around 20,000 copies of the list, according to the Daily Mail, “only two are said to exist today.”

From the Daily Mail article:

Historians have painstakingly researched all 2,820 ‘enemies of the state, traitors and undesirables’ who were ‘marked for punishment or death’ that featured in the Nazi leader’s so-called Black Book.

The result is a comprehensive digitized database that reveals who the wanted citizens were, why they were a threat to the Nazis and what was to become of them.

The list is made up of hundreds of prominent politicians, authors, poets, journalists, actors, scientists, musicians, heads of industry and religious leaders.

EM-Forster

English novelist E.M. Forster was also listed in Hitler’s “Black Book” as an “enemy of the state.”

Both Leonard and Virginia Woolf are on the list. Virginia was classified in Hitler’s list as an “enemy of the state.”Other famous writers on Hitler’s list include:

  • H.G. Wells
  • Vera Brittain
  • E.M. Forster
  • Aldous Huxley

Read the Daily Mail article to see other Brits who were on Hitler’s list and learn more about Hitler’s “Black Book” and SS-Oberführer Walter Schellenberg, the man responsible for compiling the book.

You can also access the list itself, which consists of 144 pages and 2,813 names. Virginia and Leonard are on Page 277.

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Predictably, the latest collection of Woolf sightings includes many related to the BBC Two three-part drama Life in Squares, along with Charleston, where much of the filming was done. But scroll down for references to Woolf in pop culture — including Downton Abbey — literature and war and peace.

  • Sussex and Charleston are getting a big boost from Life in SquaresLife-in-Squares-_3215726b
  • Was Life in Squares more than a reminder that the Bloomsbury Group liked sex? Many think it was.
  • Life in Squares episode 3 review: The dream fades.
  • Reaction to episode one of Life in Squares.
  • Life in Squares: How the Radical Bloomsbury Group Fares on Screen by Frances Spalding
  • Life in Squares review: ‘absurd, beautiful characters in a ridiculously golden world’ by Lucy Mangen
  • Life in Squares among top 30 shows on the telly.
  • Life in Squares will be available on Blu-ray and DVD in the UK on Aug. 17. It can be shipped to the U.S., but it can only be played on a Code 2 DVD player, a Code A Blu-ray player or a code-free player. Visit Amazon UK for details.
  • The Hotel Russell’s mistake in closing the Virginia Woolf Burger Bar.
  • Charleston Farmhouse campaigns for funds.Charleston
  • Charleston, the Bloomsbury Group’s living legacy: A piece in The Daily Mail
  • Bloomsbury Group: Charleston Farmhouse and Berwick Church, an Aug. 14, 2015, blog post.
  • Vanessa Bell steps out of the shadows.
  • Fashion tips from the Bloomsbury Group, including a link to Cressida Bell.
  • A Virginia Woolf primer.
  • Season six of Downton Abbey mentions Lady Edith’s meeting with Virginia Woolf.
  • In Spain, a walk of one’s own, courtesy of the BBC.
  • Clarice Lispector earned comparisons to Virginia Woolf.
  • Virginia Woolf on the wall — in color — at New Cafe at Elliott Bay Books.
  • New collection, Pleasures of the Table: A Literary Anthology, includes Virginia Woolf and is illustrated with vivid historic images from the collection of the British Library.
  • Tavistock Square: A Decade After Terror, A Reminder Of Peace” by Susan Pollack

    A screenshot of the YouTube video trailer for Camden Connections that shows the Virginia Woolf portrait

    A screenshot of the YouTube video trailer for Creative Connections: Camden Radical Characters that shows the Virginia Woolf portrait

  • Schoolchildren choose Woolf for “Creative Connections: Camden Radical Characters,” a NPG exhibit that fetes the famous faces who have lived, worked in, or studied in the north London area.
  • Review of Pat Barker’s Noonday mentions Woolf: “If Life Class and Toby’s Room were benevolently haunted by Vera Brittain and Virginia Woolf, the ghosts of Elizabeth Bowen, Rose Macaulay and Graham Greene walk the bombsites of Noonday.”
  • Review says second section of Among the Ten Thousand Things, by Julia Pierpont pays homage to Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, “as time passes and characters are killed off, their lives synopsised.”
  • An article about scholar and performance artist Coco Fusco, whose 2006 work A Room of One’s Own: Women and Power in the New America, uses Virginia Woolf as a springboard to talk about female interrogators in U.S.-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Ruth Scurr on Virginia Woolf: A review of Viviane Forrester’s Virginia Woolf: A Portrait. From the Aug. 14, 2015, issue of the Times Literary Supplement.
  • Prettiot’s “Suicide Hotline” song invokes Woolf.

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Here are two wonderful resources shared with the VWoolf Listserv by Karen Levenback, Female Poets of WWIauthor of Virginia Woolf and the Great War (2000).

The first is an online timeline of literature in the context of historical, social and cultural events from 1914-1919.

The second is research conducted by Lucy London, who Levenback describes as “a most helpful woman in England, who is working on women and the Great War.”

London, a poet who trained as a French/English shorthand secretary and worked in London in the media and public relations, is now researching women poets of the Great War around the world.

She describes her project as “a (self-funded) research project that seeks to inform the general public about the First World War through exhibitions of the work and lives of women who wrote poetry at that time.”

Her blog, Female Poets of the Great War, documents her efforts. But she has other blogs as well:

Follow her on Twitter @LucyLondon7, where she posted this thank you after learning that Blogging Woolf was reporting on her efforts:

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Andre Gerard‘s three-part essay on Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is nowto the lighthouse on Berfrois, the UK literary-intellectual online magazine. Here are the links:

  1. Names, Texts and WWI in To the Lighthouse
  2. The Odyssey, The Times and Howard’s End in To the Lighthouse
  3. Virgil, Tolstoy and War in To the Lighthouse

Also on the site is another essay by Gerard, publisher of Patremoir Press: Virginia’s Whipping Boy: The Strange Case of Virginia Woolf and Edmund Gosse

Ultimately, what I want to do is to think about To the Lighthouse as an antiwar novel, and to make the case that it is one of the greatest books ever written about the causes and consequences of war. – Gerard in “Names, Texts and WWI in To the Lighthouse

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Elizabeth F. Evans

Elizabeth Evans

Elizabeth Evans will give a lecture titled “Virginia Woolf’s Airplanes: Air Power and Aerial Views Between the World Wars” at 6 p.m. on Feb. 17 in Technology Building Room 301 at Purdue University North Central. It is free and open to the public.

Evans, assistant teaching professor at the University of Notre Dame, will examine the effects the growing importance of military air power had on British art and literature during the interwar years. Her research focuses specifically on Woolf’s work, specifically Mrs. Dalloway (1925) and The Years (1937).

In a 2013 essay, “Air War, Propaganda, and Woolf’s Anti-Tyrrany Aesthetic,” which appeared in Volume 59, Issue 1 of the journal Modern Fiction Studies, Evans argues that Woolf is both attracted to and troubled by the unique point of view the airplane provides. She admires its aesthetic possibilities but is disturbed by its seemingly inevitable links to warfare.

Evans edited Woolf and the City: Selected Papers from the 19th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf (2010). She is now at work on a book about aerial views in British and Anglophone writing from the early twentieth century to the present.

For more information, contact Dr. Heather Fielding, PNC Assistant Professor of English, at hfieldin@pnc.edu or at 219-785-5327.

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The Things They CarriedWho’d have figured? Tim O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried” is a classic, the title story in a collection of linked pieces that I’ve long heard is a “must read” for writers. So it caught my attention when I noticed it at the library recently, and I plucked it off the shelf. Finally, I thought.

Virginia Woolf wasn’t on my mind when I opened the book—for obvious reasons, I’d say—but there she was, on the first page:

First Lieutenant Jimmy Cross carried letters from a girl named Martha…. More than anything, he wanted Martha to love him as he loved her, but the letters were mostly chatty, elusive on the matter of love. She was a virgin, he was almost sure. She was an English major at Mount Sebastian, and she wrote beautifully about her professors and roommates and midterm exams, about her respect for Chaucer and her great affection for Virginia Woolf.

The surprising Woolf sighting made me think about Septimus Smith and his wartime experiences, the horrors that haunted him for the rest of his brief life. Different war, same horrors—it never ends. I read a few more stories—they’re compelling and well written—but soon I’d had enough and returned the book to the library.

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SuchFriends Blog

…In England

War has come to Bloomsbury.

The image of Lord Horatio Kitchener, 64, recruiting young men, appears for the first time, on the black and white cover of London Opinion magazine.

1st appearance of Lord Kitchener's recruiting image 1st appearance of Lord Kitchener’s recruiting image

Bloomsbury friend, critic Desmond MacCarthy, 37, has signed up for the Red Cross Ambulance Service; art critic Clive Bell, turning 33, is trying to figure out how to join a non-combat unit such as the Army Service Corps; and painter Duncan Grant, 29, has entered the National Reserve.

Despite the hostilities in the rest of Europe, the Bloomsberries don’t stop moving. Duncan takes a studio in Fitzroy Square as well as rooms in nearby 46 Gordon Square, where Clive lives with his wife, painter Vanessa Bell, 35. Their friend John Maynard Keynes, 31, writing articles for The Economist magazine, moves to Great Ormond Street; and Vanessa’s sister…

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