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Archive for the ‘Woolf in academia’ Category

I made the leap. I signed up to attend the Literature Cambridge course Virginia Woolf’s Gardens this summer at Wolfson College, University of Cambridge.

Along with others, I will be there July 14-19 learning about the importance of gardens to Woolf’s life and work, from her early story “Kew Gardens” (1917) to her last novel, Between the Acts (1941).

Other course readings include Jacob’s Room (1922), Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), Orlando (1928) and A Room of One’s Own (1929).

Daily schedule

Each day starts with a lecture presented by a leading scholar. A seminar or a Cambridge-style one-hour supervision (tutorial) for students in groups of three or four follows, taught by lecturers and post-docs from the University of Cambridge to discuss the topic of the day, looking closely at that day’s text.

Lecturers include Suzanne Raitt, Gillian Beer, Alison Hennegan, Clare Walker Gore, Karina Jakubowicz, Oliver Goldstein, Trudi Tate, Kabe Wilson and Caroline Holmes.

Manuscript, excursions, and more

We will also get to view the manuscript of A Room of One’s Own held in Cambridge.

When the course ends, I’ll head out on two excursions — to Monk’s House and Charleston. I visited both sites in 2004 but am eager to go again.

Virginia Woolf’s writing Lodge at Monk’s House

We’ll also have time to explore Cambridge on our own, go punting, discuss literature with other students, and reflect, the website tells us.

Listen to Caroline Zoob’s podcast

Hear Caroline Zoob, author of Virginia Woolf’s Garden, interviewed by Literature Cambridge lecturer Karina Jukubowicz.

Spots available

There is still space available in the course. You can get more information and book online.

‘Everything tended to set itself in a garden where there was none of this gloom.’
– To the Lighthouse.

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Editor’s Note: This post was written by Dr. Trudi Tate of the University of Cambridge.

Our Woolf course, ‘Virginia Woolf in Cambridge’, 18-22 July 2016, is filling up, but there are still a few rooms available at the favourable summer school rate.

Virginia Woolf in Cambridge 2016 looks at some of the best-loved of Woolf’s books (Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and A Room of One’s Own) from fresh angles, putting them alongside contemporary creative work by Susan Sellers (Vanessa and Virginia) and Kabe Wilson (Of One Woman or So). Gillian Beer’s lecture on ‘Reading The Waves Across a Lifetime’ promises to be a highlight, giving us a way into this fascinating book for the 2017 Woolf course, in which we plan to study The Waves and other exciting and challenging Woolf works.

Our summer course gives students the experience of a Cambridge-style supervision (a tutorial). Two or three students spend an hour with an experienced Cambridge supervisor, discussing the work of the day, and engaging in careful close reading, in the tradition of Cambridge English since the 1920s.

We will explore some of the historical context of Woolf’s books, asking what they have to say about their own time, and how they speak to ours.

For more details — and to register — visit the Virginia Woolf in Cambridge website.

 

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A three-week literary course on Virginia Woolf will take place in London May 23-June 10. Literary London: Virginia Woolf on Site will be led by Jane Garrity and is part of the literaryLondon2016bUniversity of Colorado at Boulder’s Study Abroad Program. It is open to graduate and undergraduate students from all universities.

Here is information from the global seminar course website:

This seminar on the work and life of Virginia Woolf uses the city of London to deepen and make concrete an understanding of this extraordinary author’s body of work.

Participants will have access to all of the most important literary sites related to Woolf’s life and be able to see up close the enormous impact of London and its environs on Woolf’s work.

The seminar will examine the ways that the city of London and its adjacent countryside come together in Woolf’s complex vision of the English nation, its elaborate class hierarchy, and its storied history. Woolf herself believed that London was “the center of life itself,” and this seminar seeks to illustrate how integral this belief is to an understanding of her literary geography.

In addition to in class discussions, there will be walking tours to key London locations as well as excursions to Monk’s House, Charleston Farmhouse, Knole and Sissinghurst. Students will also participate in a hands-on art project in the studio of Cressida Bell, the great-niece of Virginia Woolf who specializes in textile and interior design.

The program is directed by Professor Jane Garrity, an expert on British modernism in literature with research focusing in modernism and empire, gender and sexuality studies, and cultural studies. She will select program participants, lead a pre-program orientation, lead the course while abroad, and act as resident director in London.

Application deadline is March 1, 2016. Learn more about this global seminar, academic credits, housing, costs, and extracurricular activities at studyabroad.colorado.edu.

For more information about teaching, learning and traveling in England, see these links:

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If you are interested in Virginia Woolf and art, a 46-minute introductory talk on “Women Writers and the Avant-Garde: Virginia Woolf and Painting” is a real find.

Dr. Manuela Palacios González

Dr. Manuela Palacios González

Dr. Manuela Palacios González, professor of English Literature at the University of Santiago at Compostela, is the lecturer.

Thanks to Manuela Palacios Gonzalez for the link.

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Two sightings that locate Virginia Woolf in academia — a natural fit of course.

Screen Shot 2013-04-19 at 12.05.49 PMFirst up is a sighting posted by Emily Kopley to the Virginia Woolf Listserv that has also made its way around Facebook. It appeared in the April 8, 2013, issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education as an essay on teaching English to high school students and was titled “What my Ph.D. Taught Me.” The author is Jessica Levenstein, an English teacher at Horace Mann.

Kopley posted “the Woolfian bit” to the list, since the article is available to Chronicle subscribers only. She is the author of Virginia Woolf and the Thirties Poets (Cecil Woolf Publishers, 2011, #60 in the Bloomsbury Heritage monograph series).

“Every now and then, in the classroom, there are transcendent moments that surpass my own great expectations, formed in the classrooms of my astounding professors. Last spring, as we finished discussing Clarissa Dalloway’s June day, we read aloud Clarissa’s reaction to the news of Septimus’s suicide: “A thing there was that mattered; a thing, wreathed about with chatter, defaced, obscured in her own life, let drop every day in corruption, lies, chatter.”

“The room was quiet for a moment, as my students considered what that “thing” might be for Clarissa, and what it might be for them. Finally, an 11th-grade girl at the far end of the table sighed, “I wish I could always be in the middle of reading *Mrs. Dalloway.*” Become a teacher, I thought, and your wish can come true.

The second academic sighting is Simon Gikandi’s editor’s column, “The Fantasy of the Library,” in the January issue of PMLA.pmla.2013.128.issue-1.cover Gikandi begins the piece by relating the envy of Woolf that he felt “Once upon a time, when I was dreaming of becoming a writer.”

His envy, he explains, was “because she had the good fortune to live in Bloomsbury, close to the British Museum and its famous Reading Room.” He goes on to cite Woolf’s descriptions of the room in A Room of One’s Own and Jacob’s Room.

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