Archive for the ‘Woolf online’ Category

If you have 16 minutes and an interest in Virginia Woolf’s life and writing — and you must or you wouldn’t be visiting this blog — take a look at this Virginia Woolf timeline in photographs. It’s set to Phillip Glass music and it will make you recall The Hours.

Read Full Post »

This 10-minute video uses clever animation and a narrator with a charming British accent to tell the story of Virginia Woolf’s life and writing within the context of Modernism. It is produced by The School of Life.

Read Full Post »

Most of the reactions below come via Twitter, where “Life in Squares” was a trending topic after the first episode aired last night with an audience of between 1.85 and 1.9 million UK viewers.

In the aftermath, one must-read review is by Frances Spalding, acclaimed biographer of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant. Her piece on The Conversation website is titled “Life in Squares: how the radical Bloomsbury Group fares on screen.”

Here’s a quote from it:

Her despairing cry may be echoed by some viewers of the BBC’s three-part series Life in Squares, for the Bloomsbury Group attracts many detractors as well as legions of devotees. — Frances Spalding

Be sure to click on the comments below to read Maggie Humm’s assessment of Spalding’s review, along with her own insights.

Family reaction

Before the official premiere, Emma Woolf, great-niece of Leonard and Virginia Woolf, penned her reaction for The Daily Mail: “How TV’s got my aunt Virginia Woolf so wrong.”

And Vanessa Bell’s granddaughter, Cressida Bell, posted this on Facebook the morning after:

Cressida Bell

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Here is a cool Woolf sighting from @Shantal82 that I found on Twitter today. It includes some lovely visuals to go along with a quote from Mrs. Dalloway.


Read Full Post »

Woolf sightings appear online daily, and Blogging Woolf posts the briefest of them on Facebook. But today we have Friendsgathered a few to share with readers here as well. Here they are:

Read Full Post »

The Huffington Post recently ran a piece on word clouds formed from frequently used words in classic literary works. It says that word clouds from the works provide an “emotional, impressionistic interpretation of stories we’re used to analyzing methodically.”

Here is the word cloud created from Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse. There are seven more created from the works of other writers at this link.

To the Lighthouse word cloud

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,421 other followers

%d bloggers like this: