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Archive for the ‘Woolf online’ Category

The 134th anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s birth got some attention. As usual. Below are some of the sightings I found online. But be sure to read yesterday’s post on this blog, “Virginia Woolf on her birthday, in her diaries,” first.

Any excuse to extend Virginia Woolf’s birthday fest!🎈🎂🎉 https://t.co/eLAUvo13TI

— Kathleen Burke (@kgburke3) January 26, 2016

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Join blogger Heavenali for a #Woolfalong in the new year. 24059707566_42fe92f7c0_o

Starting tomorrow and running throughout 2016, readers will choose six books — or more, if desired — by or about Virginia Woolf for their reading pleasure.

Here are the guidelines for every month of the year, with readers choosing their favorites for each:

January and February – Read a famous Woolf novel, such as To the Lighthouse (1927) or Mrs. Dalloway (1925).

March and April: Read Woolf’s beginning and ending novels, The Voyage Out (1915) or Night and Day (1919) or Between the Acts (1941).

May and June: Read any of her shorter fiction, such as a collection of short stories. Possibilities include:

  • Kew Gardens (1919)
    Monday or Tuesday (1921)
    A Haunted House and Other Short Stories (1944)
    Mrs. Dalloway’s Party (1973)
    The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf (1985)

July and August: Read a biography, either one written by Woolf — Flush (1933), Orlando (1928), or Roger Fry: A Biography (1941) or a biography of Virginia Woolf.

September and October: Read some of Woolf’s nonfiction. Heavenali mentions either Woolf’s essays or diaries, but I would add her letters to the list.

November and December: Read another novel, such as The Years (1937) Jacob’s Room (1922) or The Waves (1931).

When sharing your reading experience on social media, use the hashtag #Woolfalong.

Blogger Heavenali pledges to post six #Woolfalong discussion-style entries, one every two months, where links to other posts can be shared. Meanwhile, a Woolf discussion has already begun.

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Here is a collection of some of the latest Woolf sightings from around the Web, as recently shared on the Blogging Woolf Facebook page.

  1. Reviewers name Adeline one of the top reads of the year. http://bit.ly/1IBvrdmwoolf_200
  2. Feminist punk choir Gaggle gives performance centered on famous women’s speeches, including Virginia Woolf. http://bit.ly/1NtBBZ2
  3. Peter Mendelsund’s 2014 book, What We See When We Read, asks the reader to consider the geography of Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse. http://bit.ly/1OKprhS
  4. Virginia Woolf mentioned in “The World-Changing Power of the Flu” in the Oct. 21, 2015, issue of The Wall Street Journal. http://www.wsj.com/…/the-world-changing-power-of-the-flu-14…
  5. The Great British Dream Factory: The Strange History of Our National Imagination, by Dominic Sandbrook, disses Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury group because of what he deems their snobbery, according to this review. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f5f1fe6a-8899-11e5-90de-f44762bf9896.html
  6. Rebecca Solnit’s Harper’s article on why interviewers won’t stop asking accomplished women about the fruit of their loins, rather than the fruit of their minds. http://harpers.org/archive/2015/10/the-mother-of-all-questions/?single=1
  7. I Call Myself a Feminist, collection of short essays, includes quotes from Virginia Woolf. http://bit.ly/1N44Gyq
  8. Virginia Woolf included in registery listing where everyone was on 29 September 1939 http://www.newstatesman.com/politics
  9. Just a few degrees of separation between Virginia Woolf and Jack the Ripper. Really. http://www.casebook.org/au…/interviews/deborah-mcdonald.html
  10. Virginia Woolf mentioned regarding the transformative effect of illness http://brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/gyms-the-wellness-orthodoxy-and-the-virtues-of-ill-health/
  11. Virginia Woolf sexts from The New Yorker​. http://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/the-collected-sexts-of-virginia-woolf-and-vita-sackville-west?mbid=social_twitter
  12. Black Rat by Cole Closser takes a simple cartoon archetype – the black rat of the title – and turns him into a funny book version of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. http://bit.ly/1YoLAYw

 

 

 

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An email from Cecil Woolf this morning reminded me that today would be his uncle Leonard’s 135th birthday.

I posted the reminder on Facebook and sent out a tweet about it.

Others (@manuelardingo @diconodioggi @SomeOfHerParts) picked it up and added to the conversation, resulting in a string of tweets about the day — and how one marks it.

This one included a photo of Virginia’s Nov. 25, 1928 diary entry:

 

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I just came across a fascinating project titled “Literary Bloomsbury” that combines social media with theVW Twitter Bloomsbury Group.

In it, Camilla Lunde, whose Twitter handle is @CGlunde, imagines how Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, E.M. Forster and the Hogarth Press would make use of 21st-century social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.

With this project, Lunde has given the four key members of the group their own social media presence. Woolf is on Twitter as @mrsstephenwoolf. Forester has an author Facebook page. Bell has an Instagram account as mrsstephenbell. And the Hogarth Press is on YouTube.

While I find the idea interesting, its reach is limited at present. Woolf only has four tweets posted. I was unable to find Forster’s page when I did a Facebook search. Bell’s Instagram account is private, so can’t be viewed unless one goes to a link on the Project Publishing blog. And I couldn’t locate the YouTube page for the Hogarth press either, although a screenshot exists on Lunde’s Tumblr blog. Lunde does not include links to the accounts on her blog.

Lunde’s project has won praise on social media and an award from the UCL Centre for Publishing at University College London.

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If you have 16 minutes and an interest in Virginia Woolf’s life and writing — and you must or you wouldn’t be visiting this blog — take a look at this Virginia Woolf timeline in photographs. It’s set to Phillip Glass music and it will make you recall The Hours.

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This 10-minute video uses clever animation and a narrator with a charming British accent to tell the story of Virginia Woolf’s life and writing within the context of Modernism. It is produced by The School of Life.

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