Archive for the ‘Woolf online’ Category

An email from Cecil Woolf this morning reminded me that today would be his uncle Leonard’s 135th birthday.

I posted the reminder on Facebook and sent out a tweet about it.

Others (@manuelardingo @diconodioggi @SomeOfHerParts) picked it up and added to the conversation, resulting in a string of tweets about the day — and how one marks it.

This one included a photo of Virginia’s Nov. 25, 1928 diary entry:


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I just came across a fascinating project titled “Literary Bloomsbury” that combines social media with theVW Twitter Bloomsbury Group.

In it, Camilla Lunde, whose Twitter handle is @CGlunde, imagines how Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, E.M. Forster and the Hogarth Press would make use of 21st-century social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.

With this project, Lunde has given the four key members of the group their own social media presence. Woolf is on Twitter as @mrsstephenwoolf. Forester has an author Facebook page. Bell has an Instagram account as mrsstephenbell. And the Hogarth Press is on YouTube.

While I find the idea interesting, its reach is limited at present. Woolf only has four tweets posted. I was unable to find Forster’s page when I did a Facebook search. Bell’s Instagram account is private, so can’t be viewed unless one goes to a link on the Project Publishing blog. And I couldn’t locate the YouTube page for the Hogarth press either, although a screenshot exists on Lunde’s Tumblr blog. Lunde does not include links to the accounts on her blog.

Lunde’s project has won praise on social media and an award from the UCL Centre for Publishing at University College London.



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If you have 16 minutes and an interest in Virginia Woolf’s life and writing — and you must or you wouldn’t be visiting this blog — take a look at this Virginia Woolf timeline in photographs. It’s set to Phillip Glass music and it will make you recall The Hours.

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This 10-minute video uses clever animation and a narrator with a charming British accent to tell the story of Virginia Woolf’s life and writing within the context of Modernism. It is produced by The School of Life.

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Most of the reactions below come via Twitter, where “Life in Squares” was a trending topic after the first episode aired last night with an audience of between 1.85 and 1.9 million UK viewers.

In the aftermath, one must-read review is by Frances Spalding, acclaimed biographer of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant. Her piece on The Conversation website is titled “Life in Squares: how the radical Bloomsbury Group fares on screen.”

Here’s a quote from it:

Her despairing cry may be echoed by some viewers of the BBC’s three-part series Life in Squares, for the Bloomsbury Group attracts many detractors as well as legions of devotees. — Frances Spalding

Be sure to click on the comments below to read Maggie Humm’s assessment of Spalding’s review, along with her own insights.

Family reaction

Before the official premiere, Emma Woolf, great-niece of Leonard and Virginia Woolf, penned her reaction for The Daily Mail: “How TV’s got my aunt Virginia Woolf so wrong.”

And Vanessa Bell’s granddaughter, Cressida Bell, posted this on Facebook the morning after:

Cressida Bell

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Here is a cool Woolf sighting from @Shantal82 that I found on Twitter today. It includes some lovely visuals to go along with a quote from Mrs. Dalloway.


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