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Archive for the ‘Woolf resources’ Category

The Bulletin of the New York Public Library dating from 1897 through 1977 is now online and includes the Virginia Woolf Issue, Issue 2, Winter 1977.

This issue features the Stephen family on the cover, along with multiple articles on The Years and essays that examine Three Guineas.

A special treat in the issue is Woolf’s hand-drawn genealogy of the Pargiter family that appears on the reverse of the Contents page, Page 155 in the PDF. Issue 2 begins on page 152 in the PDF numbering.

Thanks to Vara Neverow and the VWoolf Listserv for news of this online resource.

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If you haven’t joined the site Academia.edu, you may want to sign up. A number of papers on Virginia Virginia WoolfWoolf are uploaded there and can be downloaded free of charge. Some of them were shared at recent Woolf conferences. You can also search the site for additional Woolf resources.

Recently uploaded papers include:

Academia.edu is a platform for academics to share research papers.

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The British Library’s Discovering Literature: 20th-century website offers a number of resources to Virginia Woolf’s work. They include:

You can also find these links to other Woolf collection materials in the right sidebar of this page on the site:

  • Letter from Virginia Woolf to Frances Cornford about A Room of One’s Own, 1929
  • “Monday or Tuesday” by Virginia Woolf
  • Three Guineas by Virginia Woolf
  • Vanessa Bell dust jacket for The Years
  • “Kew Gardens” by Virginia Woolf, 1919
  • “Kew Gardens” by Virginia Woolf, 1927
  • ‘Hyde Park Gate News’, a magazine by Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell
  • ‘The Messiah’ by Quentin Bell and Virginia Woolf
  • ‘The Dunciad’ by Quentin Bell and Virginia Woolf
  • ‘Eminent Charlestonians’, with illustrations by Quentin Bell and text by Virginia Woolf

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A recent article from English Studies is now available free on the Taylor and Francis untitledwebsite to coincide with the 75th anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s death.

The article, by Martin Ferguson Smith, is titled Virginia Woolf and “the Hermaphrodite”: A Feminist Fan of Orlando and Critic of Roger Fry, and will be free for any reader until 31 July 2016. The article can be found at http://bit.ly/Woolf_Smith.

Here’s the abstract for the article, which is available for download as a PDF.

After Virginia Woolf’s biography of Roger Fry was published in 1940, she received a letter from Mary Louisa Gordon strongly critical of her portrayal of Roger’s wife, the artist Helen Coombe, and even more critical of Roger’s character and conduct. Mary and Helen had been friends before the latter married in 1896 and went on to develop severe mental health problems. In 1936 the Woolfs had published Mary’s historical novel, Chase of the Wild Goose, about the Ladies of Llangollen. The article is in four sections. Section 1 is introductory. Section 2 is about Mary. It discusses Chase of the Wild Goose, its relationship to Orlando, and Virginia’s comments on it and its author, whom, in letters to Ethel Smyth, she calls “the Hermaphrodite”. It goes on to describe Mary’s life and career as medical doctor, suffragist, first female Inspector of Prisons in England and Wales, and scathing critic of the prison system. Section 3 presents Mary’s letter to Virginia, with significant corrections of the text published by Beth Rigel Daugherty. Section 4 focuses on Helen, and on Mary’s assessments of her and Roger.

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The proceedings of the 2013 conference of the French Virginia Woolf Society, Société d’Etudes Woolfiennes — with its theme of Outlanding Woolf — have just been published in the online journal Ebc (Etudes britanniques contemporaines).couv_ebc_48_2015_1-small275
This issue of Études britanniques contemporaines is divided into two sections that are both distinct and connected.
  • The first section— ‘Crossing into Otherness’ —turns to the poetics of crossing in contemporary English literature, in order to understand how the physical experience of ‘crossing into’ entails an ethical experience of alteration.
  • The second section — ‘Outlanding Woolf’  — follows up and inflects the theme by turning to the way Woolf invents a poetics of the ‘outlandish’ and is in turn displaced and transformed by her reception.

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So many exciting links to Bloomsbury and Virginia Woolf resources are popping up on social media this week. Since I don’t fry_booklet_virginia_woolf_1-209x300have time to write about them because I am busy preparing for the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries, June 4-7 at Bloomsburg University, I am posting links to them here.

  1. On Twitter, I learned of a rare find in the basement of the Bristol Museum of a booklet printed for the Fry memorial exhibition held at the Bristol Museum & Art Gallery in 1935. It contains the text of the exhibition’s opening speech written and delivered by Woolf. “After further research, it appears this booklet is one of the most sought after publications by the writer,” wrote Fay Curtis in her museum post. “The print run was just 125, which is why they are so rare today, and the curator at the time had several to give away. Thankfully for us, he slipped one into the exhibition file – where it remained for eighty years. We have now removed it from the old file in the basement and entered it into the Fine Art collection.”
  2. On Facebook, I learned that a copy of the exhibit booklet is available at the University of Toronto Libraries.
  3. Facebook also told me Virginia Woolf is on the move at Victoria Library. Here’s the post, which pictured the small Woolf doll on a picnic blanket in front of a college building: “Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) is on the move. She left her secure box in the E.J. Pratt Library for the summer and will be visiting places on campus. Her first stop is in front of the Victoria College building.Victoria Library FB post screenshot” The Woolf doll is actually listed in the library catalog.
  4. From Catherine Hollis via Facebook comes the news that letters from George Mallory to Lytton Strachey are up for sale. You can view the lot.
  5. From the VWoolfListserv comes news that letter from Clive Bell to Lytton Strachey are also up for sale.
  6. This morning, the items below popped up on Twitter:

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To mark the centenary of Virginia Woolf’s first novel, The Voyage Out, Routledge has put together a VirtualEnglish Studies Special Issue from English Studies that explores Woolf’s life and work. Six articles are available free of charge until the end of this year.

Odin Dekkers, the journal’s editor-in-chief, states:

In terms of subject matter, the articles presented here range from uncovering new facts about Woolf’s life to re-contextualizing and re-reading her work in the light of recent developments in Modernism studies.

Featured articles include:

  • ‘Suicidal Mania’ and Flawed Psychobiography: Two Discussions of Virginia Woolf
  • Revisiting Katherine Mansfield, Virginia Woolf and the Aesthetics of Respectability
  • Virginia Woolf’s Second Visit to Greece
  • Structure and Anti-Structure: Virginia Woolf’s Feminist Politics and “The Mark”
  • Modernism, Memory, and Desire: T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf
  • Women Knitting: Domestic Activity, Writing, and Distance in Virginia Woolf’s Fiction

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