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Archive for the ‘Woolf sightings’ Category

The 134th anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s birth got some attention. As usual. Below are some of the sightings I found online. But be sure to read yesterday’s post on this blog, “Virginia Woolf on her birthday, in her diaries,” first.

Any excuse to extend Virginia Woolf’s birthday fest!🎈🎂🎉 https://t.co/eLAUvo13TI

— Kathleen Burke (@kgburke3) January 26, 2016

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Join blogger Heavenali for a #Woolfalong in the new year. 24059707566_42fe92f7c0_o

Starting tomorrow and running throughout 2016, readers will choose six books — or more, if desired — by or about Virginia Woolf for their reading pleasure.

Here are the guidelines for every month of the year, with readers choosing their favorites for each:

January and February – Read a famous Woolf novel, such as To the Lighthouse (1927) or Mrs. Dalloway (1925).

March and April: Read Woolf’s beginning and ending novels, The Voyage Out (1915) or Night and Day (1919) or Between the Acts (1941).

May and June: Read any of her shorter fiction, such as a collection of short stories. Possibilities include:

  • Kew Gardens (1919)
    Monday or Tuesday (1921)
    A Haunted House and Other Short Stories (1944)
    Mrs. Dalloway’s Party (1973)
    The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf (1985)

July and August: Read a biography, either one written by Woolf — Flush (1933), Orlando (1928), or Roger Fry: A Biography (1941) or a biography of Virginia Woolf.

September and October: Read some of Woolf’s nonfiction. Heavenali mentions either Woolf’s essays or diaries, but I would add her letters to the list.

November and December: Read another novel, such as The Years (1937) Jacob’s Room (1922) or The Waves (1931).

When sharing your reading experience on social media, use the hashtag #Woolfalong.

Blogger Heavenali pledges to post six #Woolfalong discussion-style entries, one every two months, where links to other posts can be shared. Meanwhile, a Woolf discussion has already begun.

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Mendocino FireElizabeth Tallent’s new story collection, Mendocino Fire, deserves the praise it’s received in reviews. The stories, all set along the northern California coast where she lives, are imaginative, innovative and compelling explorations into the human condition.

As it’s her first book of fiction in more than twenty years, I dove into her stories with glee and found a happy surprise in “Eros 101.” Opening with a faculty dinner, we learn that:

“The evening’s covert (and mistaken: you’ll see) premise is that the newly hired Woolf scholar will, from her angelic professional height and as homage to VW, scheme to advance all female futures….”

Written in an essay question format, the responses disclose the encounter of said Woolf scholar, Clio Mirsak, with tenure-seeking junior faculty member Nadia, whom she refers to as “the Beloved.” The attraction is immediate and consuming but not reciprocated. The story, with its challenging construction, is clever, funny and touching. Woolf pops in and out of the narrative both directly and covertly.

A phrase from Woolf: “’Reality’ … beside which nothing matters.” (Help—can someone tell me the source of this quote?)

Unwelcome thoughts of her mother interject themselves into Clio’s fantasy: “The memory stamps out several little wildfires of desire … Just try thinking back through this woman.”

In a recent interview Tallent cites Woolf as one of her influences and among the novelists she teaches in her fiction writing classes at Stanford, so it’s no surprise that she would evoke Woolf for her feminist scholar protagonist. It was a great addition (number 86) to my ongoing list of Woolf sightings in fiction and a marvelous story collection from start to finish.

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Here is a collection of some of the latest Woolf sightings from around the Web, as recently shared on the Blogging Woolf Facebook page.

  1. Reviewers name Adeline one of the top reads of the year. http://bit.ly/1IBvrdmwoolf_200
  2. Feminist punk choir Gaggle gives performance centered on famous women’s speeches, including Virginia Woolf. http://bit.ly/1NtBBZ2
  3. Peter Mendelsund’s 2014 book, What We See When We Read, asks the reader to consider the geography of Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse. http://bit.ly/1OKprhS
  4. Virginia Woolf mentioned in “The World-Changing Power of the Flu” in the Oct. 21, 2015, issue of The Wall Street Journal. http://www.wsj.com/…/the-world-changing-power-of-the-flu-14…
  5. The Great British Dream Factory: The Strange History of Our National Imagination, by Dominic Sandbrook, disses Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury group because of what he deems their snobbery, according to this review. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f5f1fe6a-8899-11e5-90de-f44762bf9896.html
  6. Rebecca Solnit’s Harper’s article on why interviewers won’t stop asking accomplished women about the fruit of their loins, rather than the fruit of their minds. http://harpers.org/archive/2015/10/the-mother-of-all-questions/?single=1
  7. I Call Myself a Feminist, collection of short essays, includes quotes from Virginia Woolf. http://bit.ly/1N44Gyq
  8. Virginia Woolf included in registery listing where everyone was on 29 September 1939 http://www.newstatesman.com/politics
  9. Just a few degrees of separation between Virginia Woolf and Jack the Ripper. Really. http://www.casebook.org/au…/interviews/deborah-mcdonald.html
  10. Virginia Woolf mentioned regarding the transformative effect of illness http://brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/gyms-the-wellness-orthodoxy-and-the-virtues-of-ill-health/
  11. Virginia Woolf sexts from The New Yorker​. http://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/the-collected-sexts-of-virginia-woolf-and-vita-sackville-west?mbid=social_twitter
  12. Black Rat by Cole Closser takes a simple cartoon archetype – the black rat of the title – and turns him into a funny book version of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. http://bit.ly/1YoLAYw

 

 

 

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I just came across a fascinating project titled “Literary Bloomsbury” that combines social media with theVW Twitter Bloomsbury Group.

In it, Camilla Lunde, whose Twitter handle is @CGlunde, imagines how Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell, E.M. Forster and the Hogarth Press would make use of 21st-century social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.

With this project, Lunde has given the four key members of the group their own social media presence. Woolf is on Twitter as @mrsstephenwoolf. Forester has an author Facebook page. Bell has an Instagram account as mrsstephenbell. And the Hogarth Press is on YouTube.

While I find the idea interesting, its reach is limited at present. Woolf only has four tweets posted. I was unable to find Forster’s page when I did a Facebook search. Bell’s Instagram account is private, so can’t be viewed unless one goes to a link on the Project Publishing blog. And I couldn’t locate the YouTube page for the Hogarth press either, although a screenshot exists on Lunde’s Tumblr blog. Lunde does not include links to the accounts on her blog.

Lunde’s project has won praise on social media and an award from the UCL Centre for Publishing at University College London.

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Predictably, the latest collection of Woolf sightings includes many related to the BBC Two three-part drama Life in Squares, along with Charleston, where much of the filming was done. But scroll down for references to Woolf in pop culture — including Downton Abbey — literature and war and peace.

  • Sussex and Charleston are getting a big boost from Life in SquaresLife-in-Squares-_3215726b
  • Was Life in Squares more than a reminder that the Bloomsbury Group liked sex? Many think it was.
  • Life in Squares episode 3 review: The dream fades.
  • Reaction to episode one of Life in Squares.
  • Life in Squares: How the Radical Bloomsbury Group Fares on Screen by Frances Spalding
  • Life in Squares review: ‘absurd, beautiful characters in a ridiculously golden world’ by Lucy Mangen
  • Life in Squares among top 30 shows on the telly.
  • Life in Squares will be available on Blu-ray and DVD in the UK on Aug. 17. It can be shipped to the U.S., but it can only be played on a Code 2 DVD player, a Code A Blu-ray player or a code-free player. Visit Amazon UK for details.
  • The Hotel Russell’s mistake in closing the Virginia Woolf Burger Bar.
  • Charleston Farmhouse campaigns for funds.Charleston
  • Charleston, the Bloomsbury Group’s living legacy: A piece in The Daily Mail
  • Bloomsbury Group: Charleston Farmhouse and Berwick Church, an Aug. 14, 2015, blog post.
  • Vanessa Bell steps out of the shadows.
  • Fashion tips from the Bloomsbury Group, including a link to Cressida Bell.
  • A Virginia Woolf primer.
  • Season six of Downton Abbey mentions Lady Edith’s meeting with Virginia Woolf.
  • In Spain, a walk of one’s own, courtesy of the BBC.
  • Clarice Lispector earned comparisons to Virginia Woolf.
  • Virginia Woolf on the wall — in color — at New Cafe at Elliott Bay Books.
  • New collection, Pleasures of the Table: A Literary Anthology, includes Virginia Woolf and is illustrated with vivid historic images from the collection of the British Library.
  • Tavistock Square: A Decade After Terror, A Reminder Of Peace” by Susan Pollack

    A screenshot of the YouTube video trailer for Camden Connections that shows the Virginia Woolf portrait

    A screenshot of the YouTube video trailer for Creative Connections: Camden Radical Characters that shows the Virginia Woolf portrait

  • Schoolchildren choose Woolf for “Creative Connections: Camden Radical Characters,” a NPG exhibit that fetes the famous faces who have lived, worked in, or studied in the north London area.
  • Review of Pat Barker’s Noonday mentions Woolf: “If Life Class and Toby’s Room were benevolently haunted by Vera Brittain and Virginia Woolf, the ghosts of Elizabeth Bowen, Rose Macaulay and Graham Greene walk the bombsites of Noonday.”
  • Review says second section of Among the Ten Thousand Things, by Julia Pierpont pays homage to Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, “as time passes and characters are killed off, their lives synopsised.”
  • An article about scholar and performance artist Coco Fusco, whose 2006 work A Room of One’s Own: Women and Power in the New America, uses Virginia Woolf as a springboard to talk about female interrogators in U.S.-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Ruth Scurr on Virginia Woolf: A review of Viviane Forrester’s Virginia Woolf: A Portrait. From the Aug. 14, 2015, issue of the Times Literary Supplement.
  • Prettiot’s “Suicide Hotline” song invokes Woolf.

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Virginia Woolf, pugilist, is featured in a Kenyon College video designed to market the Ohio liberal arts school to prospective students.

In the video “Kenyon College: Beneath The Beech – Thomas Hawks Fears Virginia Woolf,” Kenyon Senior Chace Beech interviews English professor Thomas Hawks about the likely street fighting skills of writers James Joyce, T.S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf.

Hawk’s assessment? “Woolf could probably take them both.”

The video, which begins with the line “Words… why do we need them?”  is part of a quirky series of promotional videos produced by the college titled “Beneath the Beech.”

“I think they show how approachable and engaged Kenyon professors are with the students,” Beech said.

 

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