Archive for the ‘Woolf sightings’ Category

Predictably, the latest collection of Woolf sightings includes many related to the BBC Two three-part drama Life in Squares, along with Charleston, where much of the filming was done. But scroll down for references to Woolf in pop culture — including Downton Abbey — literature and war and peace.

  • Sussex and Charleston are getting a big boost from Life in SquaresLife-in-Squares-_3215726b
  • Was Life in Squares more than a reminder that the Bloomsbury Group liked sex? Many think it was.
  • Life in Squares episode 3 review: The dream fades.
  • Reaction to episode one of Life in Squares.
  • Life in Squares: How the Radical Bloomsbury Group Fares on Screen by Frances Spalding
  • Life in Squares review: ‘absurd, beautiful characters in a ridiculously golden world’ by Lucy Mangen
  • Life in Squares among top 30 shows on the telly.
  • Life in Squares will be available on Blu-ray and DVD in the UK on Aug. 17. It can be shipped to the U.S., but it can only be played on a Code 2 DVD player, a Code A Blu-ray player or a code-free player. Visit Amazon UK for details.
  • The Hotel Russell’s mistake in closing the Virginia Woolf Burger Bar.
  • Charleston Farmhouse campaigns for funds.Charleston
  • Charleston, the Bloomsbury Group’s living legacy: A piece in The Daily Mail
  • Bloomsbury Group: Charleston Farmhouse and Berwick Church, an Aug. 14, 2015, blog post.
  • Vanessa Bell steps out of the shadows.
  • Fashion tips from the Bloomsbury Group, including a link to Cressida Bell.
  • A Virginia Woolf primer.
  • Season six of Downton Abbey mentions Lady Edith’s meeting with Virginia Woolf.
  • In Spain, a walk of one’s own, courtesy of the BBC.
  • Clarice Lispector earned comparisons to Virginia Woolf.
  • Virginia Woolf on the wall — in color — at New Cafe at Elliott Bay Books.
  • New collection, Pleasures of the Table: A Literary Anthology, includes Virginia Woolf and is illustrated with vivid historic images from the collection of the British Library.
  • Tavistock Square: A Decade After Terror, A Reminder Of Peace” by Susan Pollack

    A screenshot of the YouTube video trailer for Camden Connections that shows the Virginia Woolf portrait

    A screenshot of the YouTube video trailer for Creative Connections: Camden Radical Characters that shows the Virginia Woolf portrait

  • Schoolchildren choose Woolf for “Creative Connections: Camden Radical Characters,” a NPG exhibit that fetes the famous faces who have lived, worked in, or studied in the north London area.
  • Review of Pat Barker’s Noonday mentions Woolf: “If Life Class and Toby’s Room were benevolently haunted by Vera Brittain and Virginia Woolf, the ghosts of Elizabeth Bowen, Rose Macaulay and Graham Greene walk the bombsites of Noonday.”
  • Review says second section of Among the Ten Thousand Things, by Julia Pierpont pays homage to Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, “as time passes and characters are killed off, their lives synopsised.”
  • An article about scholar and performance artist Coco Fusco, whose 2006 work A Room of One’s Own: Women and Power in the New America, uses Virginia Woolf as a springboard to talk about female interrogators in U.S.-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Ruth Scurr on Virginia Woolf: A review of Viviane Forrester’s Virginia Woolf: A Portrait. From the Aug. 14, 2015, issue of the Times Literary Supplement.
  • Prettiot’s “Suicide Hotline” song invokes Woolf.

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Virginia Woolf, pugilist, is featured in a Kenyon College video designed to market the Ohio liberal arts school to prospective students.

In the video “Kenyon College: Beneath The Beech – Thomas Hawks Fears Virginia Woolf,” Kenyon Senior Chace Beech interviews English professor Thomas Hawks about the likely street fighting skills of writers James Joyce, T.S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf.

Hawk’s assessment? “Woolf could probably take them both.”

The video, which begins with the line “Words… why do we need them?”  is part of a quirky series of promotional videos produced by the college titled “Beneath the Beech.”

“I think they show how approachable and engaged Kenyon professors are with the students,” Beech said.


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Here is a cool Woolf sighting from @Shantal82 that I found on Twitter today. It includes some lovely visuals to go along with a quote from Mrs. Dalloway.


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Woolf sightings appear online daily, and Blogging Woolf posts the briefest of them on Facebook. But today we have Friendsgathered a few to share with readers here as well. Here they are:

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Woolf sightings appear online daily, and Blogging Woolf posts the briefest of them on Facebook. Again today we have gathered a few to share with readers here as well. Here they are:

  • Anne Fernald speaks about editing the Cambridge edition of Mrs. Dalloway at Widener University.Last Two Seconds
  • Read the notes at the end of the book of poetry The Last Two Seconds by St. Louis poet Mary Jo Bang, and you’ll discover that six of the poems borrow their words from Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway.
  • It’s no surprise when sci-fi writer Ursula Le Guin says she was inspired by Woolf’s Orlando.
  • Ann Hamilton and the SITI Company’s “the theater is a blank page,” on stage at the Wexner Center in Columbus, Ohio, April 23-26, uses text from To the Lighthouse.
  • Woolf’s A Writer’s Life was a lifesaver for this writer.
  • Woolf is cited in a Guardian article about the Vida study that says male writers continue to dominate literary criticism.

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Woolf sightings appear online daily, and Blogging Woolf posts the briefest of them on Facebook. But today we have gathered a few to share with readers here as well. Here they are:

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A mashup by Chicago’s Second City troupe has Virginia Woolf’s name in the title, but itVirginia Woolf really isn’t about Virginia Woolf at all. Instead, the Woolf part of it comes from Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.”

Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia Woolf — A Parody” opens at the Gillian Theatre April 27, 2016 and runs through June 12, 2016. Written by Tim Sniffen with additional material by Tim Ryder, its satirical mashup of A” Streetcar Named Desire,” “Death of a Salesman,” “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “Our Town.”

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