Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Woolf sightings’ Category

Chiara Ferretti, an Italian fan of Virginia Woolf, sent Blogging Woolf this photo of a Woolf sighting she made in Venice. She found the Woolf poster at the Calle del Perdon, San Polo.

Woolf herself visited Venice three times — in 1904 with her family, in 1912 on her honeymoon with Leonard, and in 1932 with Leonard, Roger Fry and Margery Fry. On her 1904 trip, she stayed at the Grand Hotel on the Grand Canal.

On the occasion of her first visit, she wrote this in a 4 April 1904 letter to Violet Dickinson:

There never was such an amusing and beautiful place. We have a room here right at the top just at the side of the Grand Canal . . I can’t believe it is a real place yet and I wander about open-mouthed

For more on Woolf’s travels, visit In Her Steps and check out Travels with Virginia Woolf (1993) by Jan Morris.

img_0191

Read Full Post »

Here is an overdue collection of Woolf sightings from around the Web:

  1. A call for papers: Legacy and the Androgynous Mind: Reading Woolf and the Romantics https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/16225
  2. To the Lighthouse is The Wall Street Journal Book Club pick. http://on.wsj.com/29KLes3
  3. Virginia Woolf visited Wordsworth’s Dove Cottage. http://www.cumbriacrack.com/2016/07/14/wordsworths-dove-cottage-celebrates-125-years-open-public/
  4. “Typology of Women” project is an exhibition and a book that includes Virginia Woolf’s essay, “A Room of One’s Own.” http://bit.ly/29F1avz
  5. Radio Girls by Sarah-Jane Stratford, which brings in Virginia Woolf and Vita, is a hit. http://usat.ly/29z8YiC
  6. Bloomsbury in Sussex: A One-day conference https://centreformoderniststudiessussex.wordpress.com/bloomsbury-in-sussex-a-one-day-conference-marking-100-years-at-charleston/
  7. Vanessa Bell will have solo show at Dulwich Picture Gallery next year. http://bit.ly/29p4ECB
  8. An artist who promises to solve a Virginia Woolf riddle, The Waves. http://bit.ly/29noUIL
  9. More on Ethel Smyth’s music, including a video, and news of the biopic on her life, starring Cate Blanchett. http://bit.ly/29nou59
  10. Head writer for Inside Amy Schumer includes reference to Virginia Woolf in book of essays. http://nyti.ms/29p3YwL
  11. The “Virginia Monologues” inspired by Woolf. http://bit.ly/29qGhVZ
  12. On my next trip to London, I plan to visit the The Bloomsbury Club Bar. I hope they’ll comp me a drink. They have 10 of them named after Bloomsbury group members. http://bit.ly/29hNmei
  13. The Guardian on the upcoming Vita and Virginia film. http://bit.ly/29hMHtA
  14. Opera House Arts offers “Orlando.” http://bit.ly/29qFxQp
  15. Is Southern Appalachian writer Julia Franks a 21st-century Virginia Woolf? This reviewer thinks so. http://bit.ly/28SbjnW
  16. The overlooked woman from the BBC who put Virginia Woolf on the air. http://bit.ly/28MC7Yr
  17. Coverage of Virginia Woolf’s connection with Yorkshire and the Bronte Parsonage Museum, along with The International Virginia Woolf Conference 2016 in the Yorkshire Post. http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/lifestyle/books/when-virginia-woolf-met-the-relics-of-charlotte-bronte-at-haworth-1-7966226
  18. A sustained homage to Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway in AL Kennedy’s “Serious Sweet.” http://on.ft.com/1sAeJnP
  19. Penguin Books bite-sized classics for 80p–including Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway–are luring younger readers. http://bit.ly/1TPRXBi
  20. Virginia Woolf stayed at the Hotel Villa Cimbrone on the Amalfi Coast. Bella! http://bit.ly/1TPR37V
  21. The complete script of “Life in Squares,” the 3-part BBC TV series about the Bloomsbury group, is out. http://amzn.to/1XoXIZm
  22. Here’s a must-see: “A Room of Their Own: Lost Bloomsbury Interiors 1914-1930,” an exhibit June 10 – Sept. 4 in Bath https://bathnewseum.com/2016/05/20/designs-on-the-bloomsbury-group/
  23. What the Dickens does Dickens have to do with Virginia Woolf and Mrs. Dalloway? Andre Gerard explains in Berfrois. http://bit.ly/1TsMtxu

Read Full Post »

Woolf visuals sighted on Twitter today:

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Here’s the latest collection of Woolf sightings from around the Web, which I originally posted on Facebook.

  1. The Masterpiece PBS post on Virginia Woolf and Downton Abbey. However, it doesn’t include mention of the Jan. 31 episode (Season 6, Episode 5) in which Neville Chamberlain, then the minister of health, talks about the participation of his prankster brother-in-law, Horace de Vere Colethe, in the Dreadnought Hoax.
  2. Woolf witchThe weekend quiz from The Guardian includes Virginia Woolf.
  3. Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is one of Alison Bechdel’s 10 favorite books.
  4. Virginia Woolf, Rupert Brooke and the tranquility of Grantchester
  5. Virginia Woolf’s Guide to Grieving in The Huffington Post
  6. In “Women on the Verge of Extraordinary Recognition,” by Nancy Jones, Virginia Woolf is asked to write a play for the WWI village fete. Read more.
  7. Virginia Woolf had articles published in Vogue in the 1920s when Dorothy Todd was editor.
  8. Donation from Woolf’s great niece to help refurbish Charleston.
  9. Virginia Woolf on Androgyny, Creativity, and a Room of One’s Own,” by Nathan Gelgud
  10. Virginia Woolf: Witch of the Waters. A comic of literary witches.

Read Full Post »

The 134th anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s birth got some attention. As usual. Below are some of the sightings I found online. But be sure to read yesterday’s post on this blog, “Virginia Woolf on her birthday, in her diaries,” first.

Any excuse to extend Virginia Woolf’s birthday fest!🎈🎂🎉 https://t.co/eLAUvo13TI

— Kathleen Burke (@kgburke3) January 26, 2016

Read Full Post »

Join blogger Heavenali for a #Woolfalong in the new year. 24059707566_42fe92f7c0_o

Starting tomorrow and running throughout 2016, readers will choose six books — or more, if desired — by or about Virginia Woolf for their reading pleasure.

Here are the guidelines for every month of the year, with readers choosing their favorites for each:

January and February – Read a famous Woolf novel, such as To the Lighthouse (1927) or Mrs. Dalloway (1925).

March and April: Read Woolf’s beginning and ending novels, The Voyage Out (1915) or Night and Day (1919) or Between the Acts (1941).

May and June: Read any of her shorter fiction, such as a collection of short stories. Possibilities include:

  • Kew Gardens (1919)
    Monday or Tuesday (1921)
    A Haunted House and Other Short Stories (1944)
    Mrs. Dalloway’s Party (1973)
    The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf (1985)

July and August: Read a biography, either one written by Woolf — Flush (1933), Orlando (1928), or Roger Fry: A Biography (1941) or a biography of Virginia Woolf.

September and October: Read some of Woolf’s nonfiction. Heavenali mentions either Woolf’s essays or diaries, but I would add her letters to the list.

November and December: Read another novel, such as The Years (1937) Jacob’s Room (1922) or The Waves (1931).

When sharing your reading experience on social media, use the hashtag #Woolfalong.

Blogger Heavenali pledges to post six #Woolfalong discussion-style entries, one every two months, where links to other posts can be shared. Meanwhile, a Woolf discussion has already begun.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: