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Archive for the ‘Woolf sightings’ Category

Woolf visuals sighted on Twitter today:

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Here’s the latest collection of Woolf sightings from around the Web, which I originally posted on Facebook.

  1. The Masterpiece PBS post on Virginia Woolf and Downton Abbey. However, it doesn’t include mention of the Jan. 31 episode (Season 6, Episode 5) in which Neville Chamberlain, then the minister of health, talks about the participation of his prankster brother-in-law, Horace de Vere Colethe, in the Dreadnought Hoax.
  2. Woolf witchThe weekend quiz from The Guardian includes Virginia Woolf.
  3. Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is one of Alison Bechdel’s 10 favorite books.
  4. Virginia Woolf, Rupert Brooke and the tranquility of Grantchester
  5. Virginia Woolf’s Guide to Grieving in The Huffington Post
  6. In “Women on the Verge of Extraordinary Recognition,” by Nancy Jones, Virginia Woolf is asked to write a play for the WWI village fete. Read more.
  7. Virginia Woolf had articles published in Vogue in the 1920s when Dorothy Todd was editor.
  8. Donation from Woolf’s great niece to help refurbish Charleston.
  9. Virginia Woolf on Androgyny, Creativity, and a Room of One’s Own,” by Nathan Gelgud
  10. Virginia Woolf: Witch of the Waters. A comic of literary witches.

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The 134th anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s birth got some attention. As usual. Below are some of the sightings I found online. But be sure to read yesterday’s post on this blog, “Virginia Woolf on her birthday, in her diaries,” first.

Any excuse to extend Virginia Woolf’s birthday fest!🎈🎂🎉 https://t.co/eLAUvo13TI

— Kathleen Burke (@kgburke3) January 26, 2016

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Join blogger Heavenali for a #Woolfalong in the new year. 24059707566_42fe92f7c0_o

Starting tomorrow and running throughout 2016, readers will choose six books — or more, if desired — by or about Virginia Woolf for their reading pleasure.

Here are the guidelines for every month of the year, with readers choosing their favorites for each:

January and February – Read a famous Woolf novel, such as To the Lighthouse (1927) or Mrs. Dalloway (1925).

March and April: Read Woolf’s beginning and ending novels, The Voyage Out (1915) or Night and Day (1919) or Between the Acts (1941).

May and June: Read any of her shorter fiction, such as a collection of short stories. Possibilities include:

  • Kew Gardens (1919)
    Monday or Tuesday (1921)
    A Haunted House and Other Short Stories (1944)
    Mrs. Dalloway’s Party (1973)
    The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf (1985)

July and August: Read a biography, either one written by Woolf — Flush (1933), Orlando (1928), or Roger Fry: A Biography (1941) or a biography of Virginia Woolf.

September and October: Read some of Woolf’s nonfiction. Heavenali mentions either Woolf’s essays or diaries, but I would add her letters to the list.

November and December: Read another novel, such as The Years (1937) Jacob’s Room (1922) or The Waves (1931).

When sharing your reading experience on social media, use the hashtag #Woolfalong.

Blogger Heavenali pledges to post six #Woolfalong discussion-style entries, one every two months, where links to other posts can be shared. Meanwhile, a Woolf discussion has already begun.

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Mendocino FireElizabeth Tallent’s new story collection, Mendocino Fire, deserves the praise it’s received in reviews. The stories, all set along the northern California coast where she lives, are imaginative, innovative and compelling explorations into the human condition.

As it’s her first book of fiction in more than twenty years, I dove into her stories with glee and found a happy surprise in “Eros 101.” Opening with a faculty dinner, we learn that:

“The evening’s covert (and mistaken: you’ll see) premise is that the newly hired Woolf scholar will, from her angelic professional height and as homage to VW, scheme to advance all female futures….”

Written in an essay question format, the responses disclose the encounter of said Woolf scholar, Clio Mirsak, with tenure-seeking junior faculty member Nadia, whom she refers to as “the Beloved.” The attraction is immediate and consuming but not reciprocated. The story, with its challenging construction, is clever, funny and touching. Woolf pops in and out of the narrative both directly and covertly.

A phrase from Woolf: “’Reality’ … beside which nothing matters.” (Help—can someone tell me the source of this quote?)

Unwelcome thoughts of her mother interject themselves into Clio’s fantasy: “The memory stamps out several little wildfires of desire … Just try thinking back through this woman.”

In a recent interview Tallent cites Woolf as one of her influences and among the novelists she teaches in her fiction writing classes at Stanford, so it’s no surprise that she would evoke Woolf for her feminist scholar protagonist. It was a great addition (number 86) to my ongoing list of Woolf sightings in fiction and a marvelous story collection from start to finish.

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Here is a collection of some of the latest Woolf sightings from around the Web, as recently shared on the Blogging Woolf Facebook page.

  1. Reviewers name Adeline one of the top reads of the year. http://bit.ly/1IBvrdmwoolf_200
  2. Feminist punk choir Gaggle gives performance centered on famous women’s speeches, including Virginia Woolf. http://bit.ly/1NtBBZ2
  3. Peter Mendelsund’s 2014 book, What We See When We Read, asks the reader to consider the geography of Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse. http://bit.ly/1OKprhS
  4. Virginia Woolf mentioned in “The World-Changing Power of the Flu” in the Oct. 21, 2015, issue of The Wall Street Journal. http://www.wsj.com/…/the-world-changing-power-of-the-flu-14…
  5. The Great British Dream Factory: The Strange History of Our National Imagination, by Dominic Sandbrook, disses Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury group because of what he deems their snobbery, according to this review. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f5f1fe6a-8899-11e5-90de-f44762bf9896.html
  6. Rebecca Solnit’s Harper’s article on why interviewers won’t stop asking accomplished women about the fruit of their loins, rather than the fruit of their minds. http://harpers.org/archive/2015/10/the-mother-of-all-questions/?single=1
  7. I Call Myself a Feminist, collection of short essays, includes quotes from Virginia Woolf. http://bit.ly/1N44Gyq
  8. Virginia Woolf included in registery listing where everyone was on 29 September 1939 http://www.newstatesman.com/politics
  9. Just a few degrees of separation between Virginia Woolf and Jack the Ripper. Really. http://www.casebook.org/au…/interviews/deborah-mcdonald.html
  10. Virginia Woolf mentioned regarding the transformative effect of illness http://brightonandhoveindependent.co.uk/gyms-the-wellness-orthodoxy-and-the-virtues-of-ill-health/
  11. Virginia Woolf sexts from The New Yorker​. http://www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/the-collected-sexts-of-virginia-woolf-and-vita-sackville-west?mbid=social_twitter
  12. Black Rat by Cole Closser takes a simple cartoon archetype – the black rat of the title – and turns him into a funny book version of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. http://bit.ly/1YoLAYw

 

 

 

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