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Monk’s House from the rear

I saw the item below on Twitter today. It identified the shot as being “Virginia Woolf’s front porch in full bloom.”

It’s not, of course. The photo really depicts the attached greenhouse at the rear of Monk’s House in Rodmell, Sussex. But it’s a pretty shot nonetheless, so I’m adding it here, with thanks to @maisie_rs for loving Virginia Woolf enough to post it.

Thanks goes to @louisbarabbas on Twitter for the news about this song based on Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and written especially for Manchester After Hours for the 90th anniversary of the 1925 novel.

Musicians from Debt Records took part in the open recording of the song, which writers Louis Barabbas and Felix Hagan call “something of a tug-of-war between light and dark.” It was recorded in the Henry Watson Music Room at Manchester Central Library on Thursday, May 14, 2015.

A literary soundtrack inspired by Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway from The Paris Review, July 24, 2012.

Russian film director Daria Darinskaya has made a film trailer for Virginia Woolf’s The Waves, and it was short-listed in a Russian competition that asked film makers to feature their favorite book.

“I’m a film director and I’ve always dreamed to make screening of it, but I didn’t know how, before this contest,” said Darinskaya, who plays Woolf and Rhoda in the trailer.

“It just occurred to me one day – the light suddenly turns off and the six heroes are lost in the darkness with only their flashlights in their smartphones (like the first title of the novel, ‘The Moths’). They are trying to fix the electricity and waiting for their friend Percival. I think The Waves contains the answers for all our life. I wanted to show that the six heroes of The Waves are like us – they’re common people who feel common things, but they just speak with the words from the novel.”

She is planning a full-length film adaptation of The Waves, according to the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain’s Facebook page.

An exhibit of Vanessa Bell’s graphic book covers designed for the Hogarth Press are now on exhibit at  The National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C.

The exhibit, which includes designs for Virginia Woolf’s novels, opened May 11 and runs through Nov. 13.

Paula Maggio:

This is a wonderful piece that puts Bloomsbury art in the social, political and cultural context of the 1920s-1930s.

Originally posted on The Charleston Attic:

There was one item in the Gift this week which particularly caught our eye, as it documents two different aspects of Duncan Grant’s life as an artist; his creative style and his status as a member of the British art world.

CHA-P-1415-R_red

CHA-P-1415 Recto: Duncan Grant, drawing, nude woman carrying a basket, ink on paper, 20.1 cm x 14.1 cm. Photograph © The Charleston Trust

On one side of this postcard-sized piece of cream card is an ink drawing of a bare-breasted woman carrying what appears to be a basket of flowers. While there is no annotation or attribution accompanying the drawing, the classical theme and stylised figure suggest that it was made by Grant, possibly as a study for a decorative scheme. For example, it is reminiscent of the figures in Grant and Bell’s large interior painting of 1929 for Penns in the Rocks, the home of the poet, Lady…

View original 1,048 more words

The event is free and open to the public.Screen Shot 2015-05-04 at 8.45.49 PM

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