Allen Fulghum of New York University has won the 2015-16 Angelica Garnett Undergraduate Essay PrizeEssay VW Miscellany Sept. 2016, according to the September issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, edited by Ann Martin.

His paper, “Feeling the Glory, Feeling the Lack: Virginia Woolf, Terrence Malick and the Soldier’s Sublime,” was written for Professor Patrick Deer’s “Understanding Modern War Culture” course. The paper focused on a sophisticated reading of Mrs. Dalloway and the 1998 film, The Thin Red Line.

The essay will be published in a forthcoming issue of Virginia Woolf Miscellany, the publication of the International Virginia Woolf Society, which sponsored the competition.

Which is the greater ecstasy?  The man’s or the woman’s? And are they not perhaps the same?”  – Virginia Woolf, Orlando

Following the very successful performance of “Intolerance” at Onassis Cultural Centre, Io Voulgaraki is now adapting and directing Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece Orlando, starring Amalia Kavali, with support from the British Council.

orlando-3According to publicity materials: “This performance shows us Orlando in the present, in her “here” and “now” just before her end. In such a time, she tells us of the greatest moments of her life in her ultimate endeavor to achieve human contact. Through the process of recollection, she faces her most extreme experiences, at times earthly and natural and at others transcendental. She begins her narration from the start, as we always do when facing death or the unknown.”

The performance is in Greek, in a new translation by Dr. Niketas Siniossoglou.

The company expects to travel and perform in the UK later next year. “At least we would all love to visit and perform in the Woolfian birthplace and will do our best to achieve it,” wrote actress Amalia Kavali in an email to Blogging Woolf.

Opening: Sept. 30 through Dec. 4
Dates & times: Friday – Saturday – Sunday at 21:00
Running Time: 70 minutes
Tickets: 12 € general admission, 8 € concessions
Address: Skrow Theater, 5 Arhellaou Street, Pagrati, Athens, Greece
Reservations: 210 7235 842  (11:00 a.m – 14:00 p.m. and 17:00 p.m. – 20:30 p.m.)

Contact: Maria Tsolaki | 6974 76 78 90, 210 76 27 966 | mtsolaki@gmail.com

Translation: Niketas Siniossoglou
Adaptation – Direction: Io Voulgaraki
Stage and Costume design: Magdalene Avgerinou
Stage Lighting: Karol Jarek
Hair designer: Alex Scissors
Make-up designer: Marina Stat
Programme & Poster Photographs by: Kiki Papadopoulou
Teaser-Trailer: Sebastian Fragopoulos
Performer: Amalia Kavali

Download the flyer, which appears on Page 63 of the current issue of the magazine, Greece is at http://www.greece-is.com/greece-is-democracy-2016/.


In memoriam to David Bradshaw

David Bradshaw, professor of English literature at Worcester College at Oxford University and a plenary speaker at the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf held June 16-19 at Leeds Trinity University, died Sept. 13. He had been ill with cancer.

David Bradshaw at his plenary talk at this year's Virginia Woolf conference.

David Bradshaw giving his plenary talk at this year’s Virginia Woolf conference at Leeds Trinity University.

At the conference, Mr. Bradshaw gave a talk titled “‘The Very Centre of the Very Centre’: Herbert Fisher, Oxbridge and ‘That Great Patriarchal Machine’.” In his talk, he quoted Woolf as saying that her contact with Fisher “brought back my parents more than anyone else I knew.”

Vara Neverow, editor of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, invites those who knew Mr. Bradshaw to share their memories of him for that publication. “The publication of such recollections would be much valued by others, whether they knew David himself or knew only his scholarship,” she wrote in a message to the VWoolf Listserv.

Tributes to Mr. Bradshaw, who has been called “one of the great recent scholars of modernism,” prevailed on the list after news of his death was announced. Here are just a few:

I miss him already – Bonnie Scott

Just joining in the chorus of sorry over this sad news. I had heard he was ill but, I regret to say that I cherished the luxury of denial. I’m just so very very sad. He was such a funny, warm, silly, vital, brilliant, generous person. It was always a joy to see him and I learned so much from him. To this day, whenever I give a paper I remember his admonishment to himself once–“don’t get distracted, David,”–which he uttered aloud to great effect years ago. Sharing his digressive streak, I loved that so much. And, of course, almost every note of his Dalloway appears, with credit, in my edition. I owe him so much. What a terrible loss. – Anne Fernald

His plenary at Leeds was special. I have often and continue to teach from his considerable body of work. This is a terribly sad loss. My heart goes out to his family and many friends. – Jean Mills

Such an unbelievably sad loss. A superb scholar and wonderfully witty and generous man. – Maggie Humm

His colleagues in the Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh project also posted their tributes on the Waugh and Words blog on the University of Leicester website.

Mr. Bradshaw specialized in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century literature and had written many articles on literature, politics and ideas in the period 1880-1945, especially in relation to the work of Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley and W. B. Yeats, according to the Worcester College website.

His current projects included an edition of Woolf’s Jacob’s Room (CUP) with Stuart N. Clarke and a monograph “in train” that he said “will examine the ways in which Woolf, Waugh and Huxley challenged the culture of their time through their provocative engagement with the obscene.”

His books related to Woolf include:

  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, The Waves, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015).
  • (Ed., with Stuart N. Clarke) Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, Shakespeare Head Press Edition of Virginia Woolf (Chichester and Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015).
  • (Ed., with Ian Blyth) Virginia Woolf, The Years, Shakespeare Head Press Edition of Virginia Woolf (Chichester and Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, Selected Essays, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).
  • (Ed.) The Cambridge Companion to E. M. Forster (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007). I also contributed the chapter on `Howards End’ (see below).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, Carlyle’s House and Other Sketches (London: Hesperus, 2003). Incorporated into the 2nd, rev. ed. ofA Passionate Apprentice: The Early Journals of Virginia Woolf, ed. Mitchell A. Leaska (London: Pimlico, 2004).
  • Winking, Buzzing, Carpet-Beating: Reading `Jacob’s Room’, 4th Annual Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain Birthday Lecture (Southport: Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain, 2003).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).

His articles related to Woolf include:

David Bradshaw (center front) with colleagues at the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held June 16-19 at Leeds Trinity University

David Bradshaw (center front) with colleagues at the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held June 16-19 at Leeds Trinity University

Interns at Charleston blog regularly. Here is their latest post, discussing their discovery of several items in the archives that indicate an interest on the part of Bloomsbury in Matisse and his career.

In August, the curatorial team began cataloguing the larger works on paper and canvas of the Angelica Garnett Gift. The discovery of a dynamic pencil drawing depicting four frantically moving figur…

Source: Duncan Grant and Henri Matisse | The Charleston Attic

Woolf in the heartland

Beaumont is a small high desert city in Southern California’s “Inland Empire,” about 80 miles east of Los Angeles on the road to Palm Springs. I don’t know anything about the community’s literary and cultural climate and certainly don’t mean to slight residents when I say that it doesn’t strike me as a place where one would find many Woolfophiles.

But hey, I could be selling the heartland short. When my writer/musician friend Bill Bell, who lives in neighboring Banning, was prowling around the Beaumont swap meet one day recently, he too was surprised to come across this one-of-a-kind treasure. Happily he thought of me and generously paid $2 to buy it for me. It’s a wooden paintbox, about 12” x 16.” Both sides are painted, one with a whimsical winged elf. The other side is a fair-to-middling copy of the Beresford portrait of young Virginia Stephen next to a quotation I wasn’t familiar with. I traced it to Jacob’s Room:

It’s not catastrophes, murders, deaths, diseases that age and kill us; it’s the way people look and laugh, and run up the steps of the omnibuses.

I wonder how someone, having created this gem, could bear to part with it, but it’s found a good home here in my study, surrounded by my books and an assortment of compatible Woolfiana.




The late Jane Marcus, a revered feminist scholar whose seminal work established Virginia Woolf as a major canonical writer, was honored Sept. 9 with a day-long event organized by her former students and dubbed Jane Marcus Feminist University.

The day included breakout workshops, plenary roundtables and a reception in Marcus’s honor with time for sharing reminiscences and memories. It was held at The Center for the Humanities at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Topics included:

Jane Marcus memorial at the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries

  • Modernist Women Writers and Activists
  • The Spanish Civil War
  • Feminist Digital Pedagogy
  • Jane’s Scholarly Legacy
  • Jane’s Reading List

Speakers included:

  • Amanda Golden
  • Margaret Carson
  • Conor Tomás Reed
  • Cori L. Gabbard
  • J. Ashley Foster
  • Blanche Wiesen Cook
  • Jean Mills
  • Meena Alexander
  • Mary Ann Caws

For the full program and list of speakers, visit the event website.

According to Vara Neverow, who attended: “I felt very privileged to be able attend. Of the 50 or so people who came to the event, most were Jane Marcus’s former students or her long-term colleagues and friends in the world of scholarship and of them, many were Woolfians (and many of the Woolfians were members of the IVWS). Also attending the event were Michael Marcus, Jane’s husband, and Ben Marcus, her son. Her daughter, Lisa Marcus, was able to participate via a live feed. I wish that everyone who had known Jane, had met Jane even once or had been inspired by her work could have been able to attend.

“I was very glad to discover that Jean Mills is working directly with Michael Marcus on organizing and reviewing Jane’s unpublished work. Thus, we can hope that some of Jane’s scholarly endeavors will be published posthumously. Jane’s contributions to Woolf studies brought into focus the Virginia Woolf we know as a feminist, a pacifist, and a socialist. Jane’s scholarly impact was both immeasurable and invaluable,” Neverow added. 

She also provided these links:

Marcus, distinguished professor emerita at CUNY and author of so much ground-breaking scholarship on Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, feminism, modernism and other topics, died May 28, 2015, at the age of 76. At the time of her death and at the 2015 Woolf conference in Bloomsburg, Pa., scholars and students paid tribute to Marcus for her scholarship, her feminist integrity and the relationships she nurtured with students and colleagues.

Here’s an update posted today by organizer Ashley Foster:



Conference organizers J. Ashley Foster, Cori Gabbard, and Conor Tomás Reed . Photo by Vara Neverow.


At the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, scholar Catherine Hollis Small Backs of Childrenmade the connection between Virginia Woolf and Lidia Yukavitch’s novel The Small Backs of Children in her paper, “Thinking Through Virginia Woolf: Woolf as Portal in Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Small Backs of Children.”

Hollis was part of a fascinating panel titled “Woolf’s Legacy to Female Writers,” along with Eva Mendez, who spoke about Alice Munro, and Amy Muse, who spoke about Sarah Ruhl.

Hollis also wrote a review of Yuknavitch’s novel for Public Books in which she connects it to Woolf’s critique of gendered violence. “The Woolf Girl” appears in the December 15 issue of the online review site devoted to interdisciplinary discussion of books and the arts.

For more on the novel’s connections with Woolf, read Alice Lowe’s blog post, “Lidia Yuknavitch novel draws on Woolf.”

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