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Here is the call for papers for the International Virginia Woolf Society’sMLA logo guaranteed panel at MLA 2017, held Jan. 5-8 in Philadelphia. Both align with the theme “Virginia Woolf Scholars Come to Their Senses.”

Two possible approaches are being offered:

  1. papers addressing sense modalities in Woolf’s writing.  How and to what end does Woolf evoke sensory experiences of smell, touch and taste in her writing?
  2. papers offering or debating “corrective” readings of Woolf that suggest some kind of “progress” in Woolf criticism. Have earlier readings, such as poststructuralist or lesbian, been supplanted by contemporary approaches, or do we need a model other than “progression” to address Woolf’s critical heritage?

Abstracts of between 250-500 words should be sent by March 21 to Pamela Caughie at pcaughi@luc.edu. (Please note the “e” is dropped in Caughie). Participants must be MLA members by April 7, 2016.

Read the latest post from The Charleston Attic blog — this one about “Julia Margaret Cameron at 200,” the name of a conference at The Victoria and Albert Museum in London last week.

A three-week literary course on Virginia Woolf will take place in London May 23-June 10. Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 11.04.11 AM

Literary London: Virginia Woolf on Site will be led by Jane Garrity and is part of the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Study Abroad Program. It is open to graduate and undergraduate students from all universities.

Here is information from the global seminar course website:

This seminar on the work and life of Virginia Woolf uses the city of London to deepen and make concrete an understanding of this extraordinary author’s body of work.

Participants will have access to all of the most important literary sites related to Woolf’s life and be able to see up close the enormous impact of London and its environs on Woolf’s work.

The seminar will examine the ways that the city of London and its adjacent countryside come together in Woolf’s complex vision of the English nation, its elaborate class hierarchy, and its storied history. Woolf herself believed that London was “the center of life itself,” and this seminar seeks to illustrate how integral this belief is to an understanding of her literary geography.

In addition to in class discussions, there will be walking tours to key London locations as well as excursions to Monk’s House, Charleston Farmhouse, Knole and Sissinghurst. Students will also participate in a hands-on art project in the studio of Cressida Bell, the great-niece of Virginia Woolf who specializes in textile and interior design.

The program is directed by Professor Jane Garrity, an expert on British modernism in literature with research focusing in modernism and empire, gender and sexuality studies, and cultural studies. She will select program participants, lead a pre-program orientation, lead the course while abroad, and act as resident director in London.

Application deadline is March 1, 2016. Learn more about this global seminar, academic credits, housing, costs, and extracurricular activities at studyabroad.colorado.edu.

For more information about teaching, learning and traveling in England, see these links:

Inspired by her own trip from London to Greece with her spaniel, Virginia Woolf fan and Masters student Katyuli Lloyd has crafted new illustrations for Woolf’s Flush (1933).

Screenshot of her sketchbook for Flush.

Screenshot of Lloyd’s sketchbook for Flush, as posted on her website.

Her version uses four-color lithographs and black ink sketches to illustrate Woolf’s story of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s cocker spaniel. The project is part of her Masters in Children’s Book Illustration at the  Cambridge School of Art.

Layering of colors played a key role in the project, Lloyd said. “I knew that my choice of colours would be key to bringing the book to life. The added challenge was to find a colour scheme that could work for contrasting environments: a dark Victorian interior and the outdoor light of Italy.”

I first read the novel when I had taken my own spaniel from London to Greece. I was inspired by my experiences mirroring those of someone 170 years ago: the timelessness in the relationship between an owner and their dog, as well as the love of travel. -Katyuli Lloyd

Her two major Masters projects are the Flush illustrations and a rewrite of Nikolai Gogol’s Nose for 7-9 years olds in rhyming couplets, with illustrations.

An exhibition of her work will be held at the Candid Arts Trust Gallery, 3–5 Torrens Street, London EC1V, Feb. 9-13, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

I was keen for my finished artwork to have a hand-printed quality. I liked the grainy, faded lithograph prints of the 1920s and 1930s, including those of Vanessa Bell for Hogarth Press, and I wanted my artwork to nod to Woolf’s hand-printed books. – Lloyd

The Charlotte Street Hotel in the Bloomsbury district of London evokes the Bloomsbury Group with its art, its feel and its look, according to this video in which Kit Kemp explains the concept behind the drawing room.

The video begins with a Virginia Woolf quote from “Street Haunting,” goes on to explain the importance of the Bloomsbury Group, and mentions the art — of the Bloomsbury and artists of today — that is displayed on the walls. Of particular note is the Roger Fry painting that takes pride of place in the hotel library.

Special thanks to Helen Harrison of Chicago for sending Blogging Woolf the link to this information.

 

Photos of Monk’s House on Twitter

When I visited Monk’s House back in 2004, I was not permitted to take interior photographs. So of course I bought the National Trust book.

Today I came across a few photos of the house that were shared on Twitter by @CasaLettori, with text in Italian. The photos remind me of the home’s loveliness. I’m sharing them here, with the thought that camera phones have changed everything.

 

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What would happen if you took the 37,971 words that make up Woolf’s feminist polemic A Room of One’s Own (1929) and rearranged them into a work of fiction? And what would happen if that text was then turned into a work of visual art?

Kabe Wilson rearranged Woolf’s words into his novella titled Olivia N’Gowfri – Of One Woman or So. Set 80 years after the publication of Woolf’s essay, it tells the story of a young woman’s radical challenge to literary conservatism in the elitist environment of the University of Cambridge, according to The Guardian.

His work has now been turned into a piece of art, a 4 by 13-ft. sheet of paper displaying the novella’s 145 pages, with each word cut out, individually, from a copy of A Room of One’s Own, and reformed to duplicate the novella.

“[T]he real fun” of the project “was in multi-layered wordplay and finding connections between words – linking different meanings across separate historical periods,” Wilson told The Guardian.

Listen to an interview with the author, who spent four years on the project in which he used computer word lists to make sure he used every word in the original text to tell a new story.

And listen to the author’s explanation of the novella and its concept:

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