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Virginia Woolf and the Natural Worldcollected papers from the 20th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, is now available.

This compilation of 31 essays presented at the 2010 conference explores Woolf’s complex engagement with the natural world, an engagement that was as political as it was aesthetic. Kristin Czarnecki and Carrie Rohman are the editors.

The essays in the collection cover diverse topics including:

  • ecofeminism,
  • the nature of time,
  • the nature of the self,
  • nature and sporting,
  • botany,
  • climate,
  • landscape and more.

Contributors include Verita Sriratana, Patrizia Muscogiuri, Katherine Hollis, Bonnie Kime Scott, Carrie Rohman, Diana Swanson, Elisa Kay Sparks, Beth Rigel Daugherty, Jane Goldman, and Diane Gillespie, among many others from the international community of Woolf scholars.

You can order a hard copy or download a PDF of the book. The price of the trade paperback is $24.95. You will also find links to other volumes of Woolf Conference proceedings on the Clemson University Digital Press website.

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I am just back from the 2010 Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Woolf and the Natural World. While there, I met Molly Hoff, a friendly and unassuming Woolf scholar who came all the way to the Kentucky conference from San Antonio, Texas.

Molly’s accomplishments are impressive. She wrote a companion book on Mrs. Dalloway that illuminates the hidden and misunderstood in one of Virginia Woolf’s most well-read novels. Called Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway: Invisible Presences, it is designed for both teachers and students and is available from Clemson University Digital Press.

She is also the author of  “The Pseudo-Homeric World of Mrs. Dalloway,” which was published in the January 1999 issue of Twentieth Century Literature, and “The Midday Topos,” published in the Winter 1990 issue of that same publication.

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This year’s Virginia Woolf conference is coming up soon. And organizers continue to make additions to the program.

The most recent is a staged reading called “Life in the Country: A Dramatic Reading for Five Voices,” by Roberta Palumbo of Holy Names University.

The 50-minute chamber play features dialogue created from the letters, diaries, and memoirs of Virginia Woolf, Leonard Woolf, Vanessa Bell, Dr. Octavia Wilberforce and Louie Mayer.

It will be performed by professional actors from Lexington, Ky., and is scheduled to follow Thursday’s opening reception. It will be on stage at Georgetown’s Lab Theatre, right across the street from the Art Gallery, where the reception will be held.

Get more details about the 2010 Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Woolf and the Natural World, June 3-6, in the Thomas & King Leadership and Conference Center at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Ky.

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Woolf scholars, oft known as Woolfians, cannot be easily divided into two camps when it comes to gender studies.

According to Madelyn Detloff of Miami University, there are no hard and fast lines drawn between ‘lesbian and gay studies’ Woolfians and ‘queer studies’ Woolfians.

She made her point during a recent discussion about the topic on the VWoolf Listserv.

The discussion was kicked off by a question from Ann Marie Lindsey, student at the CUNY Graduate Center. As a student in Mary Ann Caws’ Art and Literature in Bloomsbury course, Lindsey asked how current queer studies scholars view Virginia Woolf and/or the Bloomsbury set.

The resulting conversation became a bit heated at times. But in between, the following contributions to a bibliography on the topic were offered by participants.

And organizers of the 2010 Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf promise to continue the discussion at the June 3-7 gathering at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Ky.

  • Julie Taddeo, “A Modernist Romance?  Lytton Strachey and the Women of Bloomsbury.” Unmanning Modernism: Gendered Re-Readings. Eds. Harrison and Peterson (1997).
  • Karyn Sproles. Desiring Women:  The Partnership of Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West. U Toronto P. 2006.
  • Tirza Latimer and Jane Marie Garrity. “Queer Cross Gender Collaborations.” The Cambridge Gay and Lesbian Companion to Literature. 2010.
  • Robert Martin and George Piggffford, eds. Queer Forster. U of Chicago Press. 1997.
  • Christopher Reed. Bloomsbury Rooms:  Modernism, Subculture, and Domesticity.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004.
  • ____. “Bloomsbury Bashing:  Homophobia and the Politics of Criticism in the Eighties.”  Genders 11 (1991):  58-80.
  • ____. “Making History:  The Bloomsbury Group’s Construction of Aesthetic and Sexual Identity.”  Gay and Lesbian Studies in Art History.  Ed.  Whitney Davis.  Binghamton: Haworth Press, 1994. 189-224.
  • Georgia Johnston. The Formation of 20th-Century Queer Autobiography:  Reading Vita Sackville-West, Virginia Woolf, Hilda Doolittle, and Gertrude Stein. 2007.
  • Brenda Helt. “Passionate Debates on ‘Odious Subjects’: Bisexuality and Woolf’s Opposition to Theories of Androgyny and Sexual Identity.” Twentieth-Century Literature. Expected publication date: 2010.
  • Anne Hermann. Queering the Moderns. Palgrave Macmillan. 2000.
  • Kathryn Simpson. “‘Queer Fish’: Woolf’s Writing of Desire Between Women in The Voyage Out  and Mrs Dalloway.”  Woolf Studies Annual  9 (2003). 55-82.
  • Erica Delsandro, “‘Myself—It was Impossible’: Queering History in Between the Acts.” Woolf Studies Annual 13 (2007). 87-109.
  • D. A. Boxwell, “‘In the Urinal’: Woolf Around Gay Men.”  Virginia Woolf and Her Influences: Selected Papers from the Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf. Ed. Jeanette McVicker & Laura Davis (Pace UP 1998). 173-78.
  • David Eberly, “Talking it All Out: Homosexual Disclosure in Woolf.”  Virginia Woolf: Themes and Variations. Selected Papers from the Second Annual Conference. Ed Vara Neverow-Turk & Mark Hussey (Pace UP 1993).
  • Madelyn Detloff. The Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the Twentieth Century. Cambridge UP. 2009.

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Write quickly. You have less than a week to submit your piece on “Woolf and the Natural World” for the Fall 2010 issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany.

The Miscellany is seeking articles examining the natural world–gardens, landscapes, animals, ecology, etc.–in Woolf’s life and writing.  Articles addressing teaching Woolf and nature are also welcome.

The theme is the same as that of the 2oth Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, which will be held June 3-5 in Georgetown, Ky.

Articles of no more than 2,500 words should be sent via e-mail attachment to kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu.

According to the Miscellany’s Web site, the publication was founded by Dr. J. J. Wilson, now emerita professor of English at Sonoma State University in California. The first issue was published in fall 1973. The publication now resides at Southern Connecticut State University.

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Sharp stripes of shadow lay on the grass, and the dew dancing on the tips of the flowers and leaves made the garden like a mosaic of single sparks not yet formed into one whole. The birds, whose breasts were specked canary and rose, now sang a strain or two together, wildly, like skaters rollicking arm-in-arm, and were suddenly silent, breaking asunder.

– Virginia Woolf, The Waves

The deadline to propose a paper, panel, workshop or reading at the 2010 Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf is Jan. 15. It will be held June 3 to 6 at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky.

You can find the Call for Papers and Call for Artists on the conference site, along with submission instructions.

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woolf conf 2010 logoA Web site for the 20th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and the Natural World has launched, and organizers have announced the conference call for papers, which are due Jan. 15, 2010.

The conference, which will be held in the Thomas & King Leadership and Conference Center at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky, is set for June 3 to 6.

Georgetown is located 10 miles north of Lexington on I-75. Get a map of the area.

Keynote speakers will be:

  • Bonnie Kime Scott, University of California, San Diego
  • Diana Swanson, Northern Illinois University
  • Carrie Rohman, Lafayette College
  • Christina Alt, University of Ottawa

The conference will also include an Art and Rare Book Exhibit at the Anne Wright Wilson Art Gallery on the Georgetown campus and a Silent Auction, with proceeds going to Old Friends, a Kentucky facility for retired thoroughbreds. 

“Sharp stripes of shadow lay on the grass, and the dew dancing on the tips of the flowers and leaves made the garden like a mosaic of single sparks not yet formed into one whole. The birds, whose breasts were specked canary and rose, now sang a strain or two together, wildly, like skaters rollicking arm-in-arm, and were suddenly silent, breaking asunder.”  Virginia Woolf – The Waves

For more information, contact conference organizer Kristin Czarnecki, assistant professor of English, by mail at Georgetown College, 400 E. College St., Georgetown, KY 40324. Or send her an e-mail.

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