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Posts Tagged ‘Bloomsbury Group’

Rummage through the attic at Charleston with The Charleston Attic blog, a record of the work of graduate student interns as they catalogue, research and interpret the Angelica Garnett Gift Collection from the home’s attic. 

Recent posts of interest include:

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Blogger Kathleen Dixon Donnelly has developed a personal walking tour, “‘Such Friends’: Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group,” which has just been published by VoiceMap as a GPS audio walking tour.

You can download it from iTunesGoogle Play and their own site, www.VoiceMap.me for just $1.99 at this link.

As Donnelly said in a recent email: “If you are planning to be in London, you can download the app onto your mobile phone. The tour starts at the entrance to Gordon Square, and once you are there, the GPS will take over. You will hear me guide you through Bloomsbury and the early lives of Virginia Woolf and her ‘such friends.’ You can see how they compare to the current BBC Two three-part drama series, Life in Squares.

“But even if you are nowhere near London, you can still download the tour from the VoiceMap site, along with any of the other interesting tours they have there. You will be able to both read it and hear it on your computer. Of course, if you come to London, I’d be happy to personally lead you on the tour as well!”

Donnelly is planning to work with VoiceMap on similar tours of where the Americans ‘hung out’ in Paris, and where William Butler Yeats, Lady Augusta Gregory, and their ‘such friends’ got together in Dublin when they were starting the Abbey Theatre.

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Here’s a new post on the Bloomsbury Group from Such Friends. All this month, blogger Kathleen Dixon Donnelly will post regular items about the group, and each is based on a specific Bloomsbury location.

In 46 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, London, in fall of 1914… | SuchFriends Blog.

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Charleston has launched a crowd funding campaign to raise funds for the conservation of painted surfaces in the house, “the world’s only Bloosmbury interior.”

According to the campaign site,

Help Charleston continue to inspire future generations . . . Without your help, the walls will crack, the paint will peel and the surfaces will crumble. Donate now and get a great reward, including tote bags, silk scarves, framed fragments of Charleston’s wallpaper and the chance to see the completed restoration work at an exclusive unveiling event. Help restore Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant’s iconic painted surfaces for future generations to enjoy.

The fundraising goal is £25,000. As of today, it is 82 percent funded, with 176 funders, some of whom you will recognize.

You can join them to preserve this Bloomsbury treasure that Burberry credits that is as the inspiration behind its autumn/winter 2014 collection, the Bloomsbury Girls, and that is also the setting for much of the filming of this summer’s BBC Two show, “Life in Squares,” about the Bloomsbury Group.

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All this month on the Such Friends blog, Kathleen Dixon Donnelly will be posting about what the Bloomsbury Group was doing from 1907-1915. Here is the link to her first post:

In 46 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury, London, in March of 1907… | SuchFriends Blog.

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Most of the reactions below come via Twitter, where “Life in Squares” was a trending topic after the first episode aired last night with an audience of between 1.85 and 1.9 million UK viewers.

In the aftermath, one must-read review is by Frances Spalding, acclaimed biographer of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant. Her piece on The Conversation website is titled “Life in Squares: how the radical Bloomsbury Group fares on screen.”

Here’s a quote from it:

Her despairing cry may be echoed by some viewers of the BBC’s three-part series Life in Squares, for the Bloomsbury Group attracts many detractors as well as legions of devotees. — Frances Spalding

Be sure to click on the comments below to read Maggie Humm’s assessment of Spalding’s review, along with her own insights.

Family reaction

Before the official premiere, Emma Woolf, great-niece of Leonard and Virginia Woolf, penned her reaction for The Daily Mail: “How TV’s got my aunt Virginia Woolf so wrong.”

And Vanessa Bell’s granddaughter, Cressida Bell, posted this on Facebook the morning after:

Cressida Bell

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Here’s a piece from The Charleston Attic blog on the 140-piece dinner service featuring famous women created by Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant. It is one of the largest commissioned works produced by the artists and was commissioned in 1932.

‘The firm of Bell and Grant’ and the Famous Women Dinner Service.

The Virginia Woolf plate is pictured in Diane Gillespie’s The Sisters’ Arts: The Writing and Painting of Virginia Woolf and The Sisters’ Arts: The Writing and Painting of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell Vanessa Bell (1988, 1991), as illustration 4.13 on p. 199. Gillespie discusses the plates briefly on p. 198. The plate pictures a young Virginia Woolf in profile with her long hair secured at her neck or pinned up; it’s difficult to make out which.

According to Gillespie, the plates were divided into four groups and Woolf’s plate is included in the writers’ group. Woolf’s plate features a border of alternating squiggles and large dots. In a July 27, 2015, message to the VWoolf Listserv, Gillespie noted that she was able to see a number of the plates during the 1980s in the home of Lady Clark.

Ann Donlon wrote a Oct. 9, 2013, post about the plates on her blog after a visit to Charleston. Titled Dinner Plates, it includes images.

Also see Woolf on a plate, a 2009 post on Blogging Woolf about Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party that includes a Woolf plate.

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