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Are you a feminist scholar? If so, you may want to know about two calls for papers offered by the feminist journal Signs: : Journal of Women in Culture and Society.

The 2021 Catharine Stimpson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship

The University of Chicago Press and Signs announce the competition for the 2021 Catharine Stimpson Prize for Outstanding Feminist Scholarship. Named in honor of the founding editor of Signs, the prize recognizes excellence and innovation in the work of emerging feminist scholars.

It is awarded biennially to the best paper in an international competition. Leading feminist scholars from around the globe will select the winner. The prizewinning paper will be published in Signs, and the author will be provided an honorarium of $1,000. All papers submitted for the Stimpson Prize will be considered for peer review and possible publication in the journal.

Eligibility: Feminist scholars in the early years of their careers (fewer than seven years since receipt of the terminal degree) are invited to submit papers for the Stimpson Prize. This includes current graduate students. Papers may be on any topic that falls under the broad rubric of interdisciplinary feminist scholarship. Submissions must be no longer than 10,000 words (including notes and references) and must conform to the guidelines for Signs contributors.

Deadline for Submissions: March 1, 2020.

Please submit papers online at http://signs.edmgr.com. Be sure to indicate submission for consideration for the Catharine Stimpson Prize. The honorarium will be awarded upon publication of the prizewinning article.

Signs Special Issue: Rethinking “First Wave” Feminisms

During the past several decades, scholarship in a variety of disciplines has challenged the “wave” model of feminism. Inspired by the 2020 centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, this special issue seeks to rethink “first wave” feminisms in a heterogeneous and expansive way—by pushing geographic, chronological, and ideological boundaries and by broadening the definition of whom we usually think of as early feminists. While contributions on the Nineteenth Amendment in the United States, and the suffrage movement worldwide, are welcome, the publication also encourages submissions that consider early manifestations of feminism and feminist movements in broad and global terms. Scholars from all disciplines are encouraged to submit their work.

The editors invite essays that consider the questions you will find here.

Deadline for submissions: Sept. 15, 2020. The issue will be guest edited by Susan Ware, general editor of the American National Biography and Honorary Women’s Suffrage Centennial Historian at the Schlesinger Library, and Katherine Marino, assistant professor of history at UCLA.

Please submit full manuscripts electronically through Signs’ Editorial Manager system at http://signs.edmgr.com. Manuscripts must conform to the guidelines for submission available at http://signsjournal.org/for-authors/author-guidelines/.

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Cecil Woolf with his 2017 monograph, “The Other Boy at the Hogarth Press.”

A special section devoted to Cecil Woolf, who died June 10 in London, will be included in Issue 95, the Spring/Summer 2019 issue of the International Virginia Woolf Society’s Miscellany. Here is the call for papers:

Call for Papers: A special section devoted to Cecil Woolf will be included in Issue 95, the Spring/Summer 2019 issue of the International Virginia Woolf Society’s Miscellany.

If you would like to submit a remembrance of Cecil Woolf to be included in that section, please contact Paula Maggio at bloggingwoolf@yahoo.com.

Submissions, which can be submitted via email to bloggingwoolf@yahoo.com, should be limited to 1,000 words. However, briefer remembrances are also welcome.

Submission deadline is July 31.

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There will be a Virginia Woolf connection at the 16th International Conference of the Brazilian Association of Comparative Literature (ABRALIC), July 15-19, 2019, at Universidade de Brasília (UNB), Brasilia, Brazil. 

The conference will include a symposium on “Contemporary Readings of Virginia Woolf,” which will be coordinated by professors Davi Pinho, Maria Oliveira and Nicea Nogueira. Paper proposals must be sent through the ABRALIC website by March 15.

The full call for papers in Brazilian Portuguese can be found on Page 86 of the symposium proposal booklet.

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Woolf in the #MeToo era, Woolf and theater, and Woolf and inclusivity are among the topics that will be covered at the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, with its theme of Woolf and Social Justice, at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 6-9.
The conference’s plenary speakers will include the following:
  • Elizabeth Abel (UC Berkeley) on Woolf and the Literary Implications of Social Justice
  • Anne Fernald (Fordham University) and Tonya Krouse (Northern Kentucky University) on Woolf in the Era of #MeToo
  • Kristin Czarnecki (Georgetown College) and Erica Delsandro (Bucknell University) on Woolf and Inclusivity
  • Ellen McLaughlin (Actor “Angels in America,” among many others], Director, Playwright “Septimus and Clarissa,” “A Narrow Bed,” among others) on Woolf, Theater, and Activism.
Other events include:
  • The June 6 evening celebration will be at the historic Taft Art Museum in downtown Cincinnati, a Greek revival, National Historic Landmark building that originally served as the home of the Taft family (and from which William Howard Taft accepted his presidential nomination in 1908).  The museum will be closed to the public and attendees will be able to peruse the collection and the garden at their leisure.
  • June 7 will feature a performance of Leonard Woolf’s play “The Hotel,” featuring students and faculty from the Mount and supervised by McLaughlin.
  • An all-conference roundtable event will conclude the conference on Sunday morning, June 9, to be followed by a visit to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in downtown Cincinnati, a museum commemorating Cincinnati’s historic location as the border between North and South, and the place to which escaped slaves fled to their freedom.

Deadline for the call for papers is Jan. 31.

Thinking is my fighting – Virginia Woolf, “Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid,” 1940

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The 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, hosted by Mount St. Joseph Universitywill be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., from June 6-9, 2019, with the theme of Virginia Woolf and Social Justice. 

Wonder Woman and Virginia Woolf wear their Pussy Hats as they take to the streets.

As a writer deeply concerned with the distribution of power, wealth, education, privileges, and opportunities, Virginia Woolf remains a relevant and sustaining voice on issues of social justice, politics, equality, pacifism, and the dangers of fascism, totalitarianism, and all types of inequality.

Whether advocating for the education of women or breaking new ground with her experimental prose or challenging the patriarchal basis of war and violence, Woolf continues—perhaps now more than ever, in our globally turbulent political moment—to speak clearly and strongly for a more just world. 

Conference organizers look for proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, and workshops from scholars of all stripes (literary and interdisciplinary), creative writers, performing artists, common readers, teachers, and students from all levels (high school, undergraduate, graduate).  They ask that submissions relate to the theme of Virginia Woolf (and, by extension, the Bloomsbury Group) and Social Justice and that they seek to illuminate her life and work through that lens.

Possible themes and topics include, but are not limited to:

·         The education of women

·         Activism and ambivalence

·         Prejudice, bias, and injustice

·         The rise of fascism and totalitarianism

·         Suffragism and the women’s movement

·         Issues of inclusivity

·         The politics of sexuality

·         Age and efficacy

·         The consequences of colonialism

·         Issues of race

·         Issues of class

·         Domesticity and the role of servants

·         Disability/impairment

·         Technology/media

·         Assembly/solidarity/alliances

·         War and the role of women

·         Woolf’s depiction of history and historical movements

·         Links between modernism and social justice

·         The dignity of work and the rights of workers

·         The dignity of human beings

·         Issues of the rights and responsibilities of the artist and the citizen

·         The politicization of art

·         Issues surrounding the poor and the socially vulnerable

·         Calls for action, for participation

In addition, conference organizers also welcome papers on the Bloomsbury Group (especially, but not limited to, the political writing and fiction of Leonard Woolf, the economic theories of John Maynard Keynes, Clive Bell’s writings on art, Duncan Grant’s attention to Eastern art and religion, etc.) and other associates of Virginia Woolf. 

Please send abstracts with names removed as attached Word documents to your e-mail.  For individual papers, please send a 250-word proposal.  For panels of three or more participants, please send a panel title and a 250-word proposal for each of the papers.  For workshops and roundtables, please send a 250- to 500-word proposal with biographies of each participant.  We are also looking for volunteers to chair individual panels. 

There will be individual panels and seminars for high school students and undergraduates; graduate students may submit proposals through the normal submission process outlined above. 

Please e-mail proposals to Drew Shannon at VWoolf2019@msj.edu by Jan. 31, 2019.

Visit www.msj.edu/VWoolf2019 for more information.  This website is currently under construction, but will be updated frequently in the coming days and weeks. 

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Call for papers: Louisville Conference 2019

The International Virginia Woolf Society will host its 19th consecutive panel at the University of Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, Feb. 21-23, 2019. The group invites proposals for critical papers on any topic concerning Woolf studies. A particular panel theme may be chosen depending on the proposals received.

Please submit by email a cover page with your name, email address, mailing address, phone number, professional affiliation (if any), and the title of your paper, and a second anonymous page containing a 250-word paper proposal with title, to Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu, by Sept. 17.

Call for Papers: Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace

Clemson University Press, in association with Liverpool University Press, will publish a two-volume edited collection of proceedings from the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace. Each book will consist of around 15 full-length essays (likely to be around 6,000-7,000 words). The work on this will be carried out over a two-year period, so that it is available by the time of the 2020 conference.

One of the big advantages is that it will allow ideas presented at the conference to be developed and shaped by what came out of discussions in individual panels and the conference more broadly while allowing editors to include roughly the same number of contributors as in the previous format.

Both volumes will be titled Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace, but will likely have different subtitles to signal the specific focus of each book (to be decided once submissions have been received).

Conference presenters who would like to be considered for inclusion in the volumes should send an extended abstract of 500 words and a short biographical statement by the extended deadline of Friday, Sept. 14, to vwoolf2018@gmail.com. Once the selection has been finalized, contributors will have until the end of March 2019 to complete chapters.

Call for papers: Collecting Woolf and your bookshelf

And don’t forget to submit a proposal for the upcoming themed issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany on “Collecting Woolf.” The deadline for submissions has been extended to Sept. 30. Get the details.

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The deadline is extended to Sept. 30 for the call for papers for an upcoming issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany focused on “Collecting Woolf.” Get the details.

In addition to more formal academic essays, the issue will collaborate with Blogging Woolf to feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.”

Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf?s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself.

If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,000 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 30, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

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