Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘call for papers’

The 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, hosted by Mount St. Joseph Universitywill be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A., from June 6-9, 2019, with the theme of Virginia Woolf and Social Justice. 

Wonder Woman and Virginia Woolf wear their Pussy Hats as they take to the streets.

As a writer deeply concerned with the distribution of power, wealth, education, privileges, and opportunities, Virginia Woolf remains a relevant and sustaining voice on issues of social justice, politics, equality, pacifism, and the dangers of fascism, totalitarianism, and all types of inequality.

Whether advocating for the education of women or breaking new ground with her experimental prose or challenging the patriarchal basis of war and violence, Woolf continues—perhaps now more than ever, in our globally turbulent political moment—to speak clearly and strongly for a more just world. 

Conference organizers look for proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, and workshops from scholars of all stripes (literary and interdisciplinary), creative writers, performing artists, common readers, teachers, and students from all levels (high school, undergraduate, graduate).  They ask that submissions relate to the theme of Virginia Woolf (and, by extension, the Bloomsbury Group) and Social Justice and that they seek to illuminate her life and work through that lens.

Possible themes and topics include, but are not limited to:

·         The education of women

·         Activism and ambivalence

·         Prejudice, bias, and injustice

·         The rise of fascism and totalitarianism

·         Suffragism and the women’s movement

·         Issues of inclusivity

·         The politics of sexuality

·         Age and efficacy

·         The consequences of colonialism

·         Issues of race

·         Issues of class

·         Domesticity and the role of servants

·         Disability/impairment

·         Technology/media

·         Assembly/solidarity/alliances

·         War and the role of women

·         Woolf’s depiction of history and historical movements

·         Links between modernism and social justice

·         The dignity of work and the rights of workers

·         The dignity of human beings

·         Issues of the rights and responsibilities of the artist and the citizen

·         The politicization of art

·         Issues surrounding the poor and the socially vulnerable

·         Calls for action, for participation

In addition, conference organizers also welcome papers on the Bloomsbury Group (especially, but not limited to, the political writing and fiction of Leonard Woolf, the economic theories of John Maynard Keynes, Clive Bell’s writings on art, Duncan Grant’s attention to Eastern art and religion, etc.) and other associates of Virginia Woolf. 

Please send abstracts with names removed as attached Word documents to your e-mail.  For individual papers, please send a 250-word proposal.  For panels of three or more participants, please send a panel title and a 250-word proposal for each of the papers.  For workshops and roundtables, please send a 250- to 500-word proposal with biographies of each participant.  We are also looking for volunteers to chair individual panels. 

There will be individual panels and seminars for high school students and undergraduates; graduate students may submit proposals through the normal submission process outlined above. 

Please e-mail proposals to Drew Shannon at VWoolf2019@msj.edu by Jan. 31, 2019.

Visit www.msj.edu/VWoolf2019 for more information.  This website is currently under construction, but will be updated frequently in the coming days and weeks. 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Call for papers: Louisville Conference 2019

The International Virginia Woolf Society will host its 19th consecutive panel at the University of Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, Feb. 21-23, 2019. The group invites proposals for critical papers on any topic concerning Woolf studies. A particular panel theme may be chosen depending on the proposals received.

Please submit by email a cover page with your name, email address, mailing address, phone number, professional affiliation (if any), and the title of your paper, and a second anonymous page containing a 250-word paper proposal with title, to Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu, by Sept. 17.

Call for Papers: Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace

Clemson University Press, in association with Liverpool University Press, will publish a two-volume edited collection of proceedings from the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace. Each book will consist of around 15 full-length essays (likely to be around 6,000-7,000 words). The work on this will be carried out over a two-year period, so that it is available by the time of the 2020 conference.

One of the big advantages is that it will allow ideas presented at the conference to be developed and shaped by what came out of discussions in individual panels and the conference more broadly while allowing editors to include roughly the same number of contributors as in the previous format.

Both volumes will be titled Virginia Woolf, Europe and Peace, but will likely have different subtitles to signal the specific focus of each book (to be decided once submissions have been received).

Conference presenters who would like to be considered for inclusion in the volumes should send an extended abstract of 500 words and a short biographical statement by the extended deadline of Friday, Sept. 14, to vwoolf2018@gmail.com. Once the selection has been finalized, contributors will have until the end of March 2019 to complete chapters.

Call for papers: Collecting Woolf and your bookshelf

And don’t forget to submit a proposal for the upcoming themed issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany on “Collecting Woolf.” The deadline for submissions has been extended to Sept. 30. Get the details.

Read Full Post »

The deadline is extended to Sept. 30 for the call for papers for an upcoming issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany focused on “Collecting Woolf.” Get the details.

In addition to more formal academic essays, the issue will collaborate with Blogging Woolf to feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.”

Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf?s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself.

If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,000 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 30, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

Read Full Post »

In 1981, in a small Northern California town, a group of like-minded feminists opened a community library. They wanted a place to read and write, to discuss books, and above all, they wanted “a library you can eat in. And thus The Sitting Room was born, and lives, and celebrated its 37th birthday this past Sunday, June 3.

Eminent Woolfian and Professor Emerita at Sonoma State University, J. J. Wilson is one of The Sitting Room’s founders and perhaps its luckiest member, as she lives (six months out of the year) in the library itself. Each room houses a different collection of women’s literature and art: e.g. the Poetry Room, the Writing Room, the Art hallway, and the Woolf Wall which graces the living room / workshop area. These collections are curated and organized by a dedicated volunteer, keeping the library’s offerings up-to-date and somewhat organized.

Books, tea, snacks and workshops

At The Sitting Room, there are books to borrow and books to read while sitting in an overstuffed armchair. Tea and snacks are freely available. Students and professors from nearby Sonoma State University use the library’s resources for research and discovery, community members pop by to read and think, and local writers hold workshops and readings.

J. J. Wilson calls The Sitting Room “an enactment of Woolf’s vision, but not an altar to her.” More than a room of one’s own, The Sitting Room is a library for everyone inspired by the values of feminism, conversation, and friendship. Its guiding spirits include not just Woolf, but also Tillie Olsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, and Meridel Le Sueur. The Woolf-inspired art of Suzanne Bellamy and other feminist artists creates a rich visual tapestry for the library.

Access the online catalog and more

To access books from this utopian, grassroots, feminist, long-lived, and beloved library, visit the library’s online catalog.

And look for more on J. J. Wilson, The Sitting Room, and the history of the International Virginia Woolf Society in an upcoming issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany with the theme “Collecting Woolf.” Meanwhile, see the call for papers below.

Call for papers
Collecting Virginia Woolf: A Special Themed Issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany

Who collects Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books? When did the demand for and economic value of Woolf’s and the Hogarth Press’s books begin in the antiquarian book trade? Are Woolf and Hogarth Press books more or less desirable than other modernist first editions? What are the emotional, haptic, and educational values of early Woolf and Hogarth Press editions for scholars, students, and common readers? What do the book collections of Virginia and Leonard Woolf tell us about their lives as readers and writers?

In addition to more formal academic essays, this upcoming issue of the Miscellany (in collaboration with Blogging Woolf ) will also feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.” Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf’s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself. If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,500 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 30, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

[1] June Farver, “2% Milk is the New Half and Half,” The Sitting Room Past, Present and Future (2012)

Read Full Post »

The topic of the International Virginia Woolf Society‘s guaranteed panel at the Modern Language Association Convention 2019 will be “Night and Day at 100.”

Panel organizers have issued a call for papers on Virginia Woolf’s novel in the centennial year of its publication that address the question: What is the twenty-first century legacy of Woolf’s “nineteenth-century” novel?

Please send 250-word abstracts to Mary Wilson at mwilson4@umassd.edu by March 12. Wilson, associate professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, is the author of The Labors of Modernism and Rhys Matters.

Read Full Post »

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Read Full Post »

One of Blogging Woolf’s bookshelves

Editor’s Note: Deadline extended to Sept. 30, 2018.

Catherine Hollis, editor of an upcoming themed issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany on “Collecting Woolf” has put out a call for papers. She is hoping to gather both traditional scholarly articles on collecting Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books, as well as shorter pieces about our own collections.

Questions that could be addressed include the following:

  • Who collects Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books?
  • When did the demand for and economic value of Woolfs’ and the Hogarth Press’s books begin in the antiquarian book trade?
  • Are Woolf and Hogarth Press books more or less desirable than other modernist first editions?
  • What are the emotional, haptic, and educational values of early Woolf and Hogarth Press editions for scholars, students, and common readers?
  • What do the book collections of Virginia and Leonard Woolf tell us about their lives as readers and writers?

In addition to more formal academic essays, this issue of the Miscellany, in collaboration with Blogging Woolf, will also feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.” Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf’s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself.

If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,000 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 1, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: