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Editor’s Note: The deadline has once again been extended — this time until June 30.

Deadline for the fourth annual Angelica Garnett Undergraduate Essay Prize sponsored by the International Virginia Woolf Society has been extended to Wednesday, June 13.

The competition, held in honor of Virginia Woolf and in memory of Angelica Garnett, writer, artist, and daughter of Woolf’s sister, Vanessa Bell, asks undergraduates to write an essay on any topic pertaining to the writings of Virginia Woolf.

Essays should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words in length, including notes and works cited, with an original title of the entrant’s choosing. Essays will be judged by the officers of the International Virginia Woolf Society: Kristin Czarnecki, President; Ann Martin, Vice-President; Alice Keane, Secretary-Treasurer; and Drew Shannon, Historian-Bibliographer. The winner will receive $200 and have the essay published in the subsequent issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany.

Download the essay entry form: IVWS Essay Contest Entry Form 2018

Please send essays in the latest version of Word.

Questions? Contact Kristin Czarnecki at: kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu.

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It’s official. Dalloway Day is the third Wednesday in June on both sides of the pond.

After years of discussion and advocacy for a day that gives Virginia Woolf’s Clarissa Dalloway equal weight with James Joyce’s Leopold Bloom, both the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain and the International Virginia Woolf Society have designated the third Wednesday in June as #DallowayDay.

Finally, we have an officially recognized day for celebrating Clarissa Dalloway’s walk across London in Woolf’s 1925 novel Mrs. Dalloway to “buy the flowers herself.”

This year it’s June 20

This year the third Wednesday falls on June 20, and events are already being planned on the official date and those surrounding it. Here are those we know about so far.

  • The Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain is getting together with Waterstones, as it did last year, to arrange a walk, discussion and talk on Saturday, June 16. It will be announced on the new VWSGB website and Facebook page, and by Waterstones as well.
  • Many members of the International Virginia Woolf Society will be together and on their way to Knole House and Sissinghurst Gardens for the pre-conference outing on June 20, the day before the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf begins. I imagine we will celebrate the day in some way and I welcome your ideas.
  • Places and Paces: Walking with Mrs. Dalloway, June 20, 4-5 p.m., at the British Library. Sponsored by the library and its Royal Society of Literature. Hermione Lee will discuss the novel’s walks and follow its paths into dreams, memories, and moments of revelation. Ticket prices range from £5 to £8 and can be booked online.
  • Dalloway Day with Sarah Churchwell, Alan Hollinghurst, Hermione Lee and Elaine Showalter, June 20, 7-8:30 p.m. at the British Library. Sponsored by the library and its Royal Society of Literature. The event will include a discussion on the significance of the novel and its effect on literary culture with Woolf’s biographer Lee; novelist Hollinghurst; literary critic Showalter, author of the seminal A Literature of their Own, and Churchwell, chair of public understanding in the humanities at the School of Advanced Study. Ticket prices range from £10 to £15 and can be booked online. Check out the RSL’s Dalloway Day page.
  • Monk’s House is holding an event on June 20, and the details will appear on the Monk’s House page of the National Trust website once they are settled.
  • The Italian Virginia Woolf Society is organizing an event dedicated to Woolf in June called “Una giornata tutta per lei” (A Day of Hers Own) on June 9 at the Casa Internazionale delle Donne, the International House of Women, the society’s home base.

Tell us about your #DallowayDay event

We urge you to add your own events in the comments section below or by sending an email to bloggingwoolf@yahoo.com, whether they are on the official date or another date. And please use the hashtag #DallowayDay in your social media posts so we can track them.

Watch out for The New Yorker

After June 20, keep your eyes out for The New Yorker magazine. A writer and editor for that publication has been in touch with Woolf societies and Blogging Woolf to discuss our plans for Dalloway Day. It turns out he is interested in traveling to England in time for Dalloway Day celebrations so he can cover it for the magazine.

His piece, if the idea is given the go-ahead, would appear in both the print and online editions, with photo coverage online. If so, this would make 2018 a banner year for dear Virginia — a Google Doodle and an official day of Clarissa’s own, covered in The New Yorker!

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One of Blogging Woolf’s bookshelves

Editor’s Note: Deadline extended to Sept. 30, 2018.

Catherine Hollis, editor of an upcoming themed issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany on “Collecting Woolf” has put out a call for papers. She is hoping to gather both traditional scholarly articles on collecting Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books, as well as shorter pieces about our own collections.

Questions that could be addressed include the following:

  • Who collects Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books?
  • When did the demand for and economic value of Woolfs’ and the Hogarth Press’s books begin in the antiquarian book trade?
  • Are Woolf and Hogarth Press books more or less desirable than other modernist first editions?
  • What are the emotional, haptic, and educational values of early Woolf and Hogarth Press editions for scholars, students, and common readers?
  • What do the book collections of Virginia and Leonard Woolf tell us about their lives as readers and writers?

In addition to more formal academic essays, this issue of the Miscellany, in collaboration with Blogging Woolf, will also feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.” Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf’s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself.

If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,000 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 1, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

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Halle Mason is the winner of the Angelica Garnett Essay Prize with a paper that focuses on the Gothic, according to the fall issue of the International Virginia Woolf Newsletter.

Her essay, “A Modern Gothic: Septimus Smith Haunts the Streets of Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway,” was written for Professor Emily James’s fourth-year course on The Metropolitan Mind at the University of St. Thomas.

Mason will receive $200 and her paper will be published in Issue 92 of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany.

The essay was one of a number of excellent entries for the Garnett prize, but stood out for the readers as “an original, layered, and well informed” engagement with Woolf’s 1925 novel. In particular, the essay was noted for the author’s skilled application of literary terminology and genre theory.

Drawing upon a breadth of knowledge, the author establishes the gothic nature of the “horrors of the everyday” in a postwar context.

Working from “Street Haunting,” she moves to detailed analyses of Mrs. Dalloway, creating a memorable, persuasive, and insightful argument. – IVWS Newsletter

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The new issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany is now online. This  double issue includes Spring vwm89and90-final-page-12016, Issue 89 and the Fall 2016, Issue 90.

The first is a truly miscellaneous collection of essays edited by Diana L. Swanson, and the second features the special topic Virginia Woolf and Illness, curated by guest editor Cheryl Hindrichs.

Download the issue as a PDF.

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The International Virginia Woolf Society is pleased to host its seventeenth consecutive panel at the University of Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, fromLouisville Conference 2016 Feb. 23-25, 2017. We invite proposals for critical papers on any topic concerning Woolf studies. A particular panel theme may be chosen depending on the proposals received.

Please submit by email a cover page with your name, email address, mailing address, phone number, professional affiliation (if any), and the title of your paper, and a second anonymous page containing a 250-word paper proposal to Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu, by Monday, Aug. 15, 2016.

Panel Selection Committee:

  • Beth Rigel Daugherty
  • Jeanne Dubino
  • Mark Hussey
  • Jane Lilienfeld
  • Vara Neverow

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Here is the call for papers for the International Virginia Woolf Society’sMLA logo guaranteed panel at MLA 2017, held Jan. 5-8 in Philadelphia. Both align with the theme “Virginia Woolf Scholars Come to Their Senses.”

Two possible approaches are being offered:

  1. papers addressing sense modalities in Woolf’s writing.  How and to what end does Woolf evoke sensory experiences of smell, touch and taste in her writing?
  2. papers offering or debating “corrective” readings of Woolf that suggest some kind of “progress” in Woolf criticism. Have earlier readings, such as poststructuralist or lesbian, been supplanted by contemporary approaches, or do we need a model other than “progression” to address Woolf’s critical heritage?

Abstracts of between 250-500 words should be sent by March 21 to Pamela Caughie at pcaughi@luc.edu. (Please note the “e” is dropped in Caughie). Participants must be MLA members by April 7, 2016.

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