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Literature Cambridge has created a popular Virginia Woolf Podcast, a series designed to discover her impact on art, philosophy, and politics in the present day.

In each episode Literature Cambridge interviews an artist, writer, or academic who has been influenced by Virginia Woolf.

Questions asked include:

  • Why is Woolf such an important figure to you?
  • How has Woolf affected your career?

So far, two podcasts are available online. In the first, “Woolf and Shakespeare: Varsha Panjwani,” Dr. Karina Jakubowicz talks with Dr. Varsha Panjwani about Woolf’s complicated relationship with William Shakespeare. The podcast attracted more than 800 listeners in the first few months alone.

In the second, “Caroline Zoob: Virginia Woolf’s Garden,” Jakubowicz talks with Caroline and Jonathon Zoob about the 10 years they spent looking after Monk’s House and restoring the garden in the spirit of the Woolfs.

Give them a listen.

Garden at Monk’s House, Lewes, Sussex

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Literature Cambridge has had a great response to its new Online Study Sessions, launched due to the coronavirus, and has responded by scheduling additional sessions.

Below is the schedule of those still to come. It includes those focused on Virginia Woolf, as well as other authors. The cost is a bargain at £22 full price and £18 for students and CAMcard holders.

Upcoming Online Study Sessions

  • Sunday 17 May: Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own. 1: After the War, with Trudi Tate. 18.00 BST
  • Sunday 24 May: Woolf, Mrs Dalloway. 18.00 BST (SOLD OUT)
  • Saturday 30 May: Woolf, Mrs Dalloway. 18.00 BST (repeat lecture)
  • Saturday 6 June: Woolf. A Room of One’s Own. 2: Women and Education with Alison Hennegan. 18.00
  • Saturday 13 June: Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest. 18.00 BST
  • Sunday 28 June: Katherine Mansfield, Selected short stories. 18.00 BST
  • Saturday 22 August: Angela Carter, stories from The Bloody Chamber. 18.00 BST
  • Sunday 6 September: Clothing in Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. 18.00 BST
  • Saturday 12 September: Reading The Waves Across a Lifetime, with Dame Gillian Beer. 18.00 BST

Most sessions will be held at 18.00 to 20.00 British Summer Time / 19.00 Central European Summer Time. Some sessions will take place at 10.00 am British Summer Time, for the benefit of people in different time zones, but students are welcome to book any session, wherever they are in the world. Check the web page for updates.

NOTE: BST (British Summer Time) is five hours ahead of EST (Eastern Standard Time) and eight hours ahead of PT (Pacific Time).

Literature Cambridge hopes to offer an introductory session on The Waves soon. If there is enough interest, they will offer it twice: once at 10.00 am and again at 18.00 pm BST. Date to be confirmed.

Online Study Session format and booking

Each Online Study Session has a live lecture via Zoom, followed by a moderated seminar discussion. The session lasts about 100 minutes, but please allow two hours. Details are available online.

Bookings are open and can be made online.

Resuming in-person Study Days

Literature Cambridge looks forward to being together again in person for ‘real life’ Study Days. These will take place at a new venue, Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge.

Safety permitting, these will resume on 19 September 2020 with a full day (11.00 am to 5.30 pm) on Woolf’s comic novel, Orlando (1928).

The program also has Study Days and half-days planned on George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Shakespeare’s Richard III, Jane Austen’s Emma, D. H. Lawrence’s poetry and novellas, and more.

A table full of Literature Cambridge T-shirts at the program’s 2018 summer course on Virginia Woolf’s Gardens

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Literature Cambridge has good news for those who live at a distance from the University of Cambridge:  Its upcoming Study Days are moving online. The intensive but accessible sessions will be held via Zoom, due to the coronavirus.

Each session has a lecture and seminar with a leading scholar and will last approximately 100 minutes. Organizers recommend that you allow two hours for each class, just in case they run a bit longer.

LITERATURE CAMBRIDGE ONLINE STUDY DAYS

Study Day: To the Lighthouse: The Mother in the Garden

Date and time: Saturday 9 May, 6–8 p.m. British Summer Time; 7–9 p.m. Central European Time

Join Lit Cambridge for an intensive evening studying one of Virginia Woolf’s greatest novels. Based on Woolf’s memories of childhood summers by the sea, To the Lighthouse is a powerfully moving account of love, art and loss.

Lecture and a seminar led by Trudi Tate, Director of Literature Cambridge and a Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge.

Date and Time for other time zones: Sunday 10 May 2020 (Repeat class)

Lit Cambridge will repeat the topic on 10 May, for the benefit of people in Japan, Australia, and similar time zones. But you are welcome to book, wherever you are. This will be a live lecture and seminar, via Zoom.

10.00-12.00 British Summer Time
11.00-13.00 Central European Time
18.00-20.00 Tokyo Time
19.00-21.00 Melbourne time
21.00-23.00 New Zealand Time

Study Day: Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway

Date and time: Sunday 24 May, 6–8 p.m. British Summer Time; 7–9 p.m. Central European Time

An intensive evening studying Virginia Woolf’s memorable novel set on a single day in London in 1923. Mrs Dalloway traces the joys, sufferings, and memories of two very different characters: Clarissa Dalloway, married to a Conservative Member of Parliament; and Septimus Smith, a former soldier who is suffering from shell shock.

Lecture and seminar led by Trudi Tate, Director of Literature Cambridge and a Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge, who has a chapter on Mrs Dalloway in her book, Modernism, History and the First World War .

Tickets and Bookings

£22 full price

£18 students and CAMcard holders

Bookings are open and can be made online.

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In England? Near Cambridge? Then you might be able to attend one or both of these talks on Virginia Woolf, presented by Literature Cambridge and Lucy Cavendish College. Here are the details:

Woolf and The Waves

Tuesday, 4 February, 1 p.m.: Rute Costa on ‘All is rippling, all is dancing’: Adapting The Waves into performance.  Founders’ Room, Lucy
Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England.

Woolf and Katherine Mansfield

Tuesday, 10 March, 1 p.m.: Clare Nicholson, Literature Cambridge and
ICE, The Ambivalent Friendship of Virginia Woolf and Katherine
Mansfield: ‘A Public of Two’. Venue: Wolfson Room, Lucy Cavendish
College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England.

Both talks are free and open to all, town and gown.

A table full of Literature Cambridge T-shirts and information as students check in for one of the program’s 2019 summer courses. Literature Cambridge offers two new courses, Woolf’s Women and Reading the 1920s, this July.

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Editor’s Note: Trudi Tate, director of Literature Cambridge, provided this piece for Blogging Woolf.

Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge

Woolfians are invited to join Literature Cambridge in summer 2020 for a rare opportunity to study Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway (1925) alongside writing by some of her most interesting contemporaries.

Reading the 1920s, held July 26-31 at Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge, will provide a week’s intensive study, with lectures, seminars, supervisions, plus visits to places of interest in Cambridge.

Shaping the 20th century

Reading the 1920s explores some of the brilliant writers working after the First World War. The 1920s is a crucial period in the shaping of the entire twentieth century and its literature. It was an extraordinarily productive decade for Woolf: between 1922 and 1931 she wrote many of her greatest works: Jacob’s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, A Room of One’s Own, The Waves, and more.

Woolf was familiar with the works students will study on this course. Some she knew very well, such as “The Waste Land” (1922) and A Passage to India (1924). She had mixed feelings about Lawrence, but admired the best of his work, noting as she finished The Waves that his writing gave her much to think about. We will study his powerful novella collection of 1923, The Fox, The Ladybird, and The Captain’s Doll, plus his joyous nature poetry in Birds, Beasts, and Flowers (also 1923).

Katrina Jacubowicz reads aloud at the summer 2019 Literature Cambridge course, Virginia Woolf’s Gardens.

Lecturers and topics

  • Alison Hennegan will discuss sexuality and censorship in the 1920s, focusing on The Well of Loneliness (1928). Why was this book by Radclyffe Hall censored while Woolf’s Orlando sold freely?
  • Peter Jones will explore the thinking of Forster’s Passage to India about India, Britain, and the campaign for Indian independence in the 1920s.
  • Trudi Tate will look at some powerful and poignant testimonies from the First World War.
  • Karina Jakubowicz will discuss Mrs. Dalloway and the social system that Woolf so criticized.

This course provides students with a great opportunity to study Woolf, Lawrence, Forster, and others together. The course aims to give a richer understanding of the writings of the 1920s, and of the turbulent history to which they bear witness.

Woolf’s Women July 19-24

Literature Cambridge also runs an intensive summer course on Woolf every year in July. In 2020, from July 19-24, the course will explore Woolf’s Women.

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