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Posts Tagged ‘Night and Day’

From the BBC Radio Drama Collection come adaptations of seven of Virginia Woolf’s pioneering modernist novels, available on CD and as a digital download.

Out since last April, each is a full-cast dramatization by such notable actors as Vanessa Redgrave and Kristin Scott-Thomas. Each includes sound effects — background chatter and the pouring of tea in Night and Day; horses’ hoofs pounding the road and trumpets sounding in Orlando; the gramophone playing, the cows mooing, and the audience clapping in Between the Acts.

The original radio broadcasts took place between October 1980 and May 2012.

The audio versions of Woolf’s novels are available in the UK and the U.S. The cost of the 14-disk CD set in the U.S. is around $30. Playing time is 11 hours and 55 minutes.

Novels included

  • The Voyage Out (1915)
  • Night and Day (1919)
  • Mrs. Dalloway (1925)
  • To the Lighthouse (1927)
  • Orlando (1928)
  • The Waves (1931)
  • Between the Acts (1941)

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This year marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of Virginia Woolf’s second novel, Night and Day. It also marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment in the U.S.

Fittingly enough, both deal with women’s struggle to obtain the right to vote.

While Woolf’s novel has often been overlooked, it is currently receiving the recognition it deserves. Nowadays it is described as “a remarkable story of two women navigating the possibilities opened up by the struggle for women’s suffrage.”

Reading and discussing Night and Day

In September of last year, Anne Fernald, professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Fordham University, led a reading group on Virginia Woolf and E. M. Forster at the Center for Fiction in Brooklyn that featured novelists Julie Orringer and Michael Cunningham discussing Night and Day.

Read Lauren Groff’s Introduction to Night and Day, which is included in the 100th anniversary edition of the novel, available from Restless Books.

According to Restless Books, the new edition of Woolf’s novel is part of a “series of beautifully packaged, newly introduced and illustrated great books from the past that still speak to our time, our place, and, especially, our restlessness. In addition to their original artwork and fresh introductions, Restless Classics brings the classroom experience to the reader with linked online teaching videos.”

Night and Day in conversation

You can also sit in on last year’s discussion of the novel held at the Brooklyn Center for Fiction by watching the video below.

In addition, “Night and Day at 100” was the topic of the International Virginia Woolf Society‘s guaranteed panel at the Modern Language Association Convention 2019. It addressed the question: What is the twenty-first century legacy of Woolf’s “nineteenth-century” novel?

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The topic of the International Virginia Woolf Society‘s guaranteed panel at the Modern Language Association Convention 2019 will be “Night and Day at 100.”

Panel organizers have issued a call for papers on Virginia Woolf’s novel in the centennial year of its publication that address the question: What is the twenty-first century legacy of Woolf’s “nineteenth-century” novel?

Please send 250-word abstracts to Mary Wilson at mwilson4@umassd.edu by March 12. Wilson, associate professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, is the author of The Labors of Modernism and Rhys Matters.

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I just found a blog that offers free e-books written by women — or as the blog puts it — by “the gals.” Virginia Woolf is listed among the gals whose works are offered in several formats.

Sadly, though, one of her novels, Night and Day, has garnered just two votes from readers. Another, The Voyage Out, has three.

So in this momentous election year here in the States, let’s cast our vote for the change we need at the polls and for Virginia online at Girlebooks.

Perhaps both ballots will help us move from night to day in this country so we don’t have to take the voyage out.

All puns intended.

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