Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Orlando’

Here’s a new take on Vita and Virginia. Vita Sackville West’s miniature book, written as an accessory for a famous doll house in 1922, is said to have been the inspiration for Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel Orlando.

The story, encapsulated in a volume about the size of a matchbox with just 20 words per tiny page, is titled “A Note of Explanation.” It was one of 200 volumes produced for the library of Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, a replica of an Edwardian residence made as a gift for the consort of George V, according to The Telegraph.

Vita was among the greats

Some of the greatest authors of the day were commissioned to write works for the doll habitat, now on display at Windsor Castle. Besides Vita, they included Thomas Hardy, Rudyard Kipling and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

The theme of Vita’s story will sound familiar to anyone who has read Woolf’s pseudo-biography. It tells the tale of an ageless figure who is present for major moments in history. However, in Vita’s version, the ageless figure is a sprite and the history the sprite lives through is fairytale history — from Cinderella’s ball to Sleeping Beauty’s kiss.

Woolf always acknowledged that Orlando had been inspired by Vita and her family, but apparently did not acknowledge that Vita had written a tiny book with a similar theme.

Get the book

A hardback cloth-bound publication of the book, sized 9.8 inches x 6.8 inches, went on sale Oct. 16 by the Royal Collection Trust, according to the BBC. It includes illustrations by Kate Baylay and an afterword by Sackville-West’s biographer, Matthew Dennison, The Guardian reported.

You can order it through the RCT shop. You can also find it on Amazon.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The luxury British fashion brand Burberry will soon launch a new collection inspired by Virginia Woolf’s novel, Orlando: A Biography. The ad campaign for the collection was shot by famed fashion photographer, Mario Testino, at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool.

burberry pic

A photo from Burberry’s newest collection (photo by Mario Testino for Burberry from Burberryplc.com).

According to a press release at Burberryplc.com, the collection will launch on Sept. 19 during London Fashion Week 2016. The collection and the ad campaign will feature pieces and styles which give a nod to Woolf’s novel by “contrasting masculine and feminine styles across different periods in history.”

The campaign will celebrate the new collection as well as highlight the craftsmen who create Burberry products.

Burberry-Campaign,-September-2016_002_646x430

An preview of the upcoming Burberry campaign (photo by Mario Testino for Burberry from Vogue.co.uk).

In the a press release at Burberryplc.com, the Chief Creative and Chief Executive Office of Burberry, Christopher Bailey, said this about the exhibition at London Fashion Week and about Woolf:

Just as Virginia Woolf’s Orlando is both a love-letter to the past and a work of profound modernity, this week-long exhibition aims to nod both to the design heritage that is so integral to Burberry’s identity, and to some of Britain’s most exciting creators, and the innovation and inspiration behind their work.

Burberry-Leather-Woolf-Tote_59533_front_large_1

The Burberry Woolf tote (from 2009).

This is not the first time Burberry has been inspired by Woolf. In 2009 Paula Maggio wrote about a Burberry collection and ad campaign which was influenced by Woolf. At the time, Burberry even offered a tote bag named after the author, which was available in several prints and styles.

Check out Vogue News for more information on Burberry’s Woolf inspired collection and about the upcoming London Fashion Week event.

Read Full Post »

A multitude of Woolf sightings from around the Web, as posted on Blogging Woolf’s Facebook page:

Read Full Post »

A recent article from English Studies is now available free on the Taylor and Francis untitledwebsite to coincide with the 75th anniversary of Virginia Woolf’s death.

The article, by Martin Ferguson Smith, is titled Virginia Woolf and “the Hermaphrodite”: A Feminist Fan of Orlando and Critic of Roger Fry, and will be free for any reader until 31 July 2016. The article can be found at http://bit.ly/Woolf_Smith.

Here’s the abstract for the article, which is available for download as a PDF.

After Virginia Woolf’s biography of Roger Fry was published in 1940, she received a letter from Mary Louisa Gordon strongly critical of her portrayal of Roger’s wife, the artist Helen Coombe, and even more critical of Roger’s character and conduct. Mary and Helen had been friends before the latter married in 1896 and went on to develop severe mental health problems. In 1936 the Woolfs had published Mary’s historical novel, Chase of the Wild Goose, about the Ladies of Llangollen. The article is in four sections. Section 1 is introductory. Section 2 is about Mary. It discusses Chase of the Wild Goose, its relationship to Orlando, and Virginia’s comments on it and its author, whom, in letters to Ethel Smyth, she calls “the Hermaphrodite”. It goes on to describe Mary’s life and career as medical doctor, suffragist, first female Inspector of Prisons in England and Wales, and scathing critic of the prison system. Section 3 presents Mary’s letter to Virginia, with significant corrections of the text published by Beth Rigel Daugherty. Section 4 focuses on Helen, and on Mary’s assessments of her and Roger.

Read Full Post »

Four Orlando prizes of $1,000 each and publication in The Los Angeles Review are awarded twice yearly for a poem, a short story, a short short story, and an essay by women writers.

Deadline is July 31. Get the details on the A Room of Her Own Foundation website. Submit online.

Screen Shot 2015-07-18 at 4.18.17 PM

Read Full Post »

Woolf sightings appear online daily, and Blogging Woolf posts the briefest of them on Facebook. Again today we have gathered a few to share with readers here as well. Here they are:

  • Anne Fernald speaks about editing the Cambridge edition of Mrs. Dalloway at Widener University.Last Two Seconds
  • Read the notes at the end of the book of poetry The Last Two Seconds by St. Louis poet Mary Jo Bang, and you’ll discover that six of the poems borrow their words from Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway.
  • It’s no surprise when sci-fi writer Ursula Le Guin says she was inspired by Woolf’s Orlando.
  • Ann Hamilton and the SITI Company’s “the theater is a blank page,” on stage at the Wexner Center in Columbus, Ohio, April 23-26, uses text from To the Lighthouse.
  • Woolf’s A Writer’s Life was a lifesaver for this writer.
  • Woolf is cited in a Guardian article about the Vida study that says male writers continue to dominate literary criticism.

Read Full Post »

to the lighthouseI first read Virginia Woolf as a college junior. I started with Mrs. Dalloway for a class and moved on to The Years on my own. My love for Woolf was immediate, but I knew my readings were only scratching the surface.

Over the years, I dipped into more Woolf — To the Lighthouse, A Room of One’s Own, Orlando — all just for fun. It wasn’t until I enrolled in a master’s program and made Woolf my focus that I truly took an in-depth approach to her and her writing.

But that doesn’t mean Woolf can’t be instructive for the common reader, as evidenced by my own experiences and those indicated by three recent pieces I found online. An article in Bustle, “18 Books Every Woman Should Read When She’s 18 (Because I Sure Wish I Had),” argues that every 18-year-old woman should read To the Lighthouse. And in Sydney’s Daily Life piece, “The Truth About Feminism,” Annabel Crabb cites A Room of One’s Own as an explicitly feminist piece she read as an 18-year-old, while a current-day college students cites the book as a feminist classic as well.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: