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Posts Tagged ‘queer Woolf’

In this week’s Woolf sightings, we have more on The Dalloway, the new “lesbian-leaning” restaurant opened by a simpatico model in New York City (1 and 2). We also have a link to the article “The Education of Virginia Woolf” that appears in the current issue of The Atlantic, which is rapidly being passed around Facebook (8).

  1. Out Model Kim Stolz Opens Lesbian-Leaning Restaurant in New YorkSheWiredThe Dalloway
    In true literary lesbian style, the bar and restaurant’s moniker is a send-up to the well-known titular character of bisexual author Virginia Woolf’s 1925 tome. As a self-described Woolf nerd, Stolz told New York Magazine that she resonates with the 
  2. 180 Minutes With Kim StolzNew York Magazine
    “She was never really able to be comfortable in her skin. Knowing the struggles that Virginia Woolf went through, it’s an ode to her and a thank-you to her,” Stolz says, taking stock of the now rollicking scene. “But Amanda will tell you she just 
  3. Victorian Bloomsbury, By Rosemary AshtonThe Independent9780300154474
    When Virginia Woolf and her sister Vanessa moved into 46 Gordon Square in 1904, in what Henry James had described as “dirty Bloomsbury”, the family was appalled at the young women’s choice of this profoundly unfashionable district of London, and 
  4. Browbeaten by a new cultural subspeciesSydney Morning Herald
    Neither highbrow intellectuals or lowbrow plebs, the middlebrow copped a pasting as far back as the 1940s from writer Virginia Woolf, who described them as ”of middlebred intelligence … in pursuit of no single object, neither art itself nor life 
  5. ‘Looking for Transwonderland,’ ‘Route 66 Still Kicks,’ and MoreNew York Times
    This season’s travel books abound with journeys inspired by literary lions — a trip to a Greek island in pursuit of the teachings of Epicurus, a hike along the river where Virginia Woolf died, an excursion to the birthplace of the Nigerian writer Ken 
  6. At Your Service: The Birth of Privates on ParadeThe Arts Desk
    It was in Singapore in 1947 that my real education began. For the first time I read Lawrence, Forster, Virginia Woolf, To the RiverMelville, Graham Greene and Bernard Shaw’s political works, becoming a lifelong Leftie. When Stanley Baxter explained Existentialism 
  7. The Education of Virginia WoolfThe Atlantic
    Born into the highest stratum of the English intellectual aristocracy, Virginia Woolf—whose set included some of the kingdom’s most illustrious families, many of its finest writers and painters, its greatest poet, its most brilliant economist—could 
  8. Free Classic Literature Newsletter! Sign UpAbout – News & Issues
    The Waves – Virginia Woolf The Waves is a novel (first published in 1931) by Virginia Woolf. The book is a narrative in Woolf’s infamous stream-of-consciousness style. Here, Woolf gives into experimentation, as the six friends are lulled–drawn with 
  9. Book News: Sasha And Malia’s Reads, Literary AlpinismNew Yorker (blog)
    At the Paris Review, Alex Siskin on Leslie Stephen, the father of Virginia Woolf and a mountaineer who made important contributions to the literature of alpinism. “A book is really like a lover. It arranges itself in your life in a way that is 
    Read 
    Climbing the Alps with Leslie Stephen.
  10. Video of the Day: Is the “Crazy Artist” Stereotype True?SF Weekly (blog)
    An ear here, a life there: Vincent van Gogh, Virginia Woolf, and Sylvia Plath each had their own way of dealing withMarbles mood disorders. In her new graphic novel, cartoonist and storyteller Ellen Forney asks an important question: For artists, are mental 

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VWM Queering Woolf“Queering Woolf,” the special issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany (Issue 82, Fall 2012), edited by Madelyn Detloff and Brenda Helt, has been posted to the Virginia Woolf Miscellany website at this link.

If you are a member of the International Virginia Woolf Society and have not been receiving the hard copy of the Miscellany, you should contact Lynn Hall, membership coordinator, to verify that you have paid your dues and that your current mailing address in the database is correct.

Those interested in joining the International Virginia Woolf Society should visit the website and follow the directions provided.

Note: while the IVWS generously supports the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, it is not an official publication of the IVWS.

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Woolf scholars, oft known as Woolfians, cannot be easily divided into two camps when it comes to gender studies.

According to Madelyn Detloff of Miami University, there are no hard and fast lines drawn between ‘lesbian and gay studies’ Woolfians and ‘queer studies’ Woolfians.

She made her point during a recent discussion about the topic on the VWoolf Listserv.

The discussion was kicked off by a question from Ann Marie Lindsey, student at the CUNY Graduate Center. As a student in Mary Ann Caws’ Art and Literature in Bloomsbury course, Lindsey asked how current queer studies scholars view Virginia Woolf and/or the Bloomsbury set.

The resulting conversation became a bit heated at times. But in between, the following contributions to a bibliography on the topic were offered by participants.

And organizers of the 2010 Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf promise to continue the discussion at the June 3-7 gathering at Georgetown College in Georgetown, Ky.

  • Julie Taddeo, “A Modernist Romance?  Lytton Strachey and the Women of Bloomsbury.” Unmanning Modernism: Gendered Re-Readings. Eds. Harrison and Peterson (1997).
  • Karyn Sproles. Desiring Women:  The Partnership of Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West. U Toronto P. 2006.
  • Tirza Latimer and Jane Marie Garrity. “Queer Cross Gender Collaborations.” The Cambridge Gay and Lesbian Companion to Literature. 2010.
  • Robert Martin and George Piggffford, eds. Queer Forster. U of Chicago Press. 1997.
  • Christopher Reed. Bloomsbury Rooms:  Modernism, Subculture, and Domesticity.  New Haven: Yale University Press, 2004.
  • ____. “Bloomsbury Bashing:  Homophobia and the Politics of Criticism in the Eighties.”  Genders 11 (1991):  58-80.
  • ____. “Making History:  The Bloomsbury Group’s Construction of Aesthetic and Sexual Identity.”  Gay and Lesbian Studies in Art History.  Ed.  Whitney Davis.  Binghamton: Haworth Press, 1994. 189-224.
  • Georgia Johnston. The Formation of 20th-Century Queer Autobiography:  Reading Vita Sackville-West, Virginia Woolf, Hilda Doolittle, and Gertrude Stein. 2007.
  • Brenda Helt. “Passionate Debates on ‘Odious Subjects’: Bisexuality and Woolf’s Opposition to Theories of Androgyny and Sexual Identity.” Twentieth-Century Literature. Expected publication date: 2010.
  • Anne Hermann. Queering the Moderns. Palgrave Macmillan. 2000.
  • Kathryn Simpson. “‘Queer Fish’: Woolf’s Writing of Desire Between Women in The Voyage Out  and Mrs Dalloway.”  Woolf Studies Annual  9 (2003). 55-82.
  • Erica Delsandro, “‘Myself—It was Impossible’: Queering History in Between the Acts.” Woolf Studies Annual 13 (2007). 87-109.
  • D. A. Boxwell, “‘In the Urinal’: Woolf Around Gay Men.”  Virginia Woolf and Her Influences: Selected Papers from the Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf. Ed. Jeanette McVicker & Laura Davis (Pace UP 1998). 173-78.
  • David Eberly, “Talking it All Out: Homosexual Disclosure in Woolf.”  Virginia Woolf: Themes and Variations. Selected Papers from the Second Annual Conference. Ed Vara Neverow-Turk & Mark Hussey (Pace UP 1993).
  • Madelyn Detloff. The Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the Twentieth Century. Cambridge UP. 2009.

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