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Posts Tagged ‘Tavistock Square’

Wednesday 9 January [1924]

At this very moment, or fifteen minutes ago to be precise, I bought the ten years lease of 52 Tavistock Sqre London W.C. 1—I like writing Tavistock. Subject of course to the lease, & to Providence, & to the unforeseen vagaries on the part of old Mrs Simons, the house is ours: & the basement, & the billard room, with the rock garden on top, & the view of the square in front & the desolated buildings behind, & Southampton Row, & the whole of London – London thou art a jewel of jewels, & jasper of jocunditie – music, talk, friendship, city views, books, publishing, something central & inexplicable, all this is now within my reach. – Virginia Woolf, Diary 2, 282-3.

The Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain held a one-day conference in London last Saturday that doubled as a general meeting for the organization, as well as a celebration of its 20th anniversary. It was coupled with the unveiling of a blue plaque in honor of Virginia and Leonard Woolf.

“Virginia Woolf and her Relatives” was the theme of the conference, and Marion Dell, Philip Carter and Maggie Humm presented papers.

After the conference, the group walked to Tavistock Square for the unveiling of a blue plaque on the exterior wall of the Tavistock Hotel to mark number 52, where Virginia and Leonard Woolf lived from 1924 to 1939. The house was destroyed in World War Two and later replaced with the hotel.

It was at 52 Tavistock Square that Woolf wrote many of her books, including Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, A Room of One’s Own, Orlando, The Waves, The Years, and Three Guineas. Her diary entries talk about her walks around the square as she thought about the novel she was working on. And her nephew, Cecil Woolf, recalls Leonard and Virginia sitting at a table in the garden and sharing a bottle of wine.

Dame Eileen Atkins, honorary president of the VWSGB, unveiled the plaque, which was funded by the society and the Tavistock Hotel. Afterwards, society members attended a reception at which Atkins read extracts from Woolf’s diaries and letters that reflected upon her life in Tavistock Square and her love of London.

Cecil sent Blogging Woolf these photos that commemorate the day.

Cecil Woolf and Jean Moorcroft Wilson at the plaque unveiling.

Dame Eileen Atkins and Maggie Humm outside the Tavistock Hotel at the plaque unveiling.

The blue plaque on the side of the Tavistock Hotel commemorating Virginia and Leonard Woolf’s tenure at 52 Tavistock Square.

 

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Wednesday 9 January [1924]

At this very moment, or fifteen minutes ago to be precise, I bought the ten years lease of 52 Tavistock Sqre London W.C. 1—I like writing Tavistock. Subject of course to the lease, & to Providence, & to the unforeseen vagaries on the part of old Mrs Simons, the house is ours: & the basement, & the billard room, with the rock garden on top, & the view of the square in front & the desolated buildings behind, & Southampton Row, & the whole of London – London thou art a jewel of jewels, & jasper of jocunditie – music, talk, friendship, city views, books, publishing, something central & inexplicable, all this is now within my reach. – D2, 282-3

Thanks to Elisa Kay Sparks for finding and posting this quote in the Woolf Group on Facebook today.

 

Tavistock Hotel

Part of the Tavistock Hotel is on the site of Virginia and Leonard Woolf’s property at 52 Tavistock Square, on the south side of the square, three houses from Southampton Row. It was the Bloomsbury house where Woolf lived the longest. It is also where she wrote most of her novels. The Woolfs occupied the top two floors before the property was destroyed during WW II. 

 

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Collin Kelley reading his poem inspired by Virginia Woolf and London: “In Tavistock Square”

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Once again, we have a Woolf sighting that connects Virginia Woolf to the 2012 Summer Olympics. This time, we learn that Nike’s Olympic headquarters is located in the British Medical Association House, located in Tavistock Square, where Woolf lived.
  1. London Olympics postcard: Nike’s Olympic headquarters are in an area rich with OregonLive.com
    So did the writer Virginia Woolf. She and her husband lived and worked in a home on Tavistock Square in the 1920s and 30s. There is a bust of her in a corner of the garden inside the square. The home was destroyed in the London Blitz during World War II.
  2. The one thing missing from the Olympic opening spectacle – this country’s Catholic Herald Online (blog)
    This Society, which has been patronised in the past by humanist luminaries such as A J Ayer, Julian Huxley, Bertrand Russell, George Bernard Shaw, Leslie Stephen (father of Virginia Woolf) and Sidney Webb, is an educational charity “whose aims are the 
  3. OrlandoThe Arts Desk
    The first time I saw Orlando, on general release in 1992, I was blown away by the beauty of Sally Potter’s homage to Virginia Woolf. Beginning in 1600 when Orlando (the suitably androgenous Tilda Swinton) is a young man, the film skips and hops through to 
  4. Where Virginia Woolf meets the White SoxChicago Reader
    To take or not to take? Asher Klein; To take or not to take? The office is in shambles. Half-filled crates block the hallways and 
  5. Skirting the issueHindustan Times
    It is apparent that we have traveled quite a bit in time, space and ideas from the time Virginia Woolf’s female narrator in A Room of One’s Own was ordered off the lawns of an Oxford college where she had accidentally strolled, as it was strictly off-limits for 
  6. The 10 best… closing lines of booksThe Guardian
    And she has. Lily’s closing words complete the circle of consciousness. Virginia Woolf was good at last lines and was always a decisive closer. Mrs Dalloway, whose first line famously has Woolf’s protagonist buying the flowers herself, ends with: “It is Clarissa, 
  7. Mother, do you love me?The Asian Age
    So we have excerpts from Virginia Woolf’s To The Lighthouse side by side with the location of her residence in London which is close to the residence of British psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott whose books on object-relations theory — an influential strand of 
  8. A Domain of One’s Own, Wired News
    Virginia Woolf, who wrote A Room of One’s Own. A domain of your own is the root of your personal cloud. Image: Roger Fry/Wikimedia Commons. In the mid-2000s I made some friends in the world of higher education who were starting to think like the web 
  9. Lynne Truss: rereading Four Lectures on Shakespeare by Ellen TerryThe Guardian
    In 1941, the year of her suicide, Virginia Woolf finished two essays. One was on Dr Johnson’s friend Mrs Thrale. The other was on the actor Ellen Terry (1847-1928). According to her diary, she found the Terry essay hard going: on 8 December 1940 she notes 
  10. Travel 101 … RavelloTODAYonline
    Villa Cimbrone is famed as where the authors of the Bloomsbury group – Virginia Woolf, Leonard Woolf, E M Forster and John Maynard Keynes – used to hang out. Villa Rufolo, on the other hand, inspired composer Richard Wagner’s opera Parsifal. Entry costs 

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