Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf Miscellany’

The new deadline of June 30 has been set for the upcoming  special issue of Virginia Woolf Miscellany (#92, Fall 2017). It seeks essays considering Woolf’s oeuvre in dialogue with works by Native American, First Nations, Australian, and New Zealander authors, among others.

Questions to consider:

  • What kind of dialogic emerges when placing Woolf’s writings alongside those of indigenous writers?
  • How might indigenous literatures enhance interpretations of Woolf’s modernist, feminist, and pacifist poetics?
  • How might such comparisons affect or inform understandings of subjectivity in women’s lives and literature, and the interconnections between narrative innovation and socio-political activism?
  • Does Woolf’s ecological vision align with those of indigenous writers responding to threats of global destruction and mass extinctions?
  • Could such comparative and intersectional work chip away at the boundaries still often imposed upon literary studies-the “West” versus the “Rest”?

Other approaches are welcome.

How to submit: Please send submissions of no more than 2,500 words, including notes and works cited, in the latest version of Word to: Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu.

Deadline for submission: Extended to June 30.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Here is a call for papers for a special topics issue (#92, Fall 2017) of the Virginia Woolf vw miscellany summer 15Miscellany on Woolf and Indigenous Literatures:

Virginia Woolf and Indigenous Literatures

This issue of VWM seeks essays that consider Woolf’s oeuvre in dialogue with works by Native American, First Nations, Australian, and New Zealander authors, among others.

  • What kind of dialogic emerges when placing Woolf’s writings alongside those of indigenous writers?
  • How might indigenous literatures enhance interpretations of Woolf’s modernist, feminist, and pacifist poetics?
  • How might such comparisons affect or inform understandings of subjectivity in women’s lives and literature, and the interconnections between narrative innovation and socio-political activism?
  • Does Woolf’s ecological vision align with those of indigenous writers responding to threats of global destruction and mass extinctions?
  • Could such comparative and intersectional work chip away at the boundaries still often imposed upon literary studies—the “West” versus the “Rest”?
  • Other approaches are welcome.

How to Submit: Please send submissions of no more than 2,500 words, including notes and works cited, in the latest version of Word to: Kristin Czarnecki, kristin_czarnecki@georgetowncollege.edu.

Submission Deadline: March 31, 2017.

Read Full Post »

The new issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany is now online. This  double issue includes Spring vwm89and90-final-page-12016, Issue 89 and the Fall 2016, Issue 90.

The first is a truly miscellaneous collection of essays edited by Diana L. Swanson, and the second features the special topic Virginia Woolf and Illness, curated by guest editor Cheryl Hindrichs.

Download the issue as a PDF.

Read Full Post »

“Woolf and Illness,” the special topics issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, has issued a call for papers with a submission deadline of July 15, 2016. Issue #90 will be published in the fall.

IVWS Logo

Virginia Woolf’s 1926 essay “On Being Ill” questions why illness has failed to feature as a prime theme of literature, alongside love, battle, and jealousy. This issue of VWM seeks contributions on Woolf’s exploration of illness in her life and work, as a paradigm for reexamining modernist literature and art, and its influence on subsequent writers.

Topics might include questions such as: How does the literature of illness challenge or enhance theories of trauma, narrative ethics, and disability studies? How does Woolf’s focus on the politics and aesthetics of the ill body inform our understanding of the period, including in relation to Victorian values, in relation to the 1918-19 flu pandemic, and in relation to mechanized modernity’s drive toward professionalization and specialization? How has the contemporary literary landscape changed to contribute to the popularity of Woolf’s focus — from the success of the medical humanities to the proliferation of autopathographies? What might be inspiring or potentially problematic in Woolf’s theory of illness as a site for creative rebellion?

Send submissions of no more than 2,500 words by 15 July 2016 to: Cheryl Hindrichs at cherylhindrichs@boisestate.edu

Read Full Post »

The electronic version of Spring/Summer 2015 Virginia Woolf Miscellany is now available to view online or download and vw miscellany summer 15print, says Editor Vara Neverow.

Edited and with an introduction by Erica Delsandro, the issue includes fascinating essays on Woolf in the context of the 1930s, diverse articles and a review of the performance of Septimus and Clarissa from the Twenty Fifth Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf. A section of the issue is also devoted to heartfelt remembrances of Shari Benstock and Jane Marcus.

The issue also includes seven book reviews, important information about upcoming Woolf conferences, and information about various Woolf societies. The issue, as always, concludes with the Society Column, written this time by the International Virginia Woolf Society’s President, Kristin Czarnecki.

Read Full Post »

The due date for submissions to the spring 2016 issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany is Oct. 15.

IVWS Logo

IVWS Logo

Call for Papers: A Truly Miscellaneous Woolf Miscellany
Spring 2016 Issue of Virginia Woolf Miscellany
Submissions due:  15 October 2015

Essays requested on any topic related to Virginia Woolf. All topics and approaches are welcome; however, we have particular interest in essays on post-colonial, eco-critical, LGBT, and historical topics. PLEASE NOTE that this CFP replaces the CFP for “The Woolfs and Africa;” however, papers on Africa are especially welcome, including but not limited to the following topics:

  • Virginia Woolf and African writers;
  • representations of Africa in Virginia’s fiction and/or essays;
  • Leonard’s international politics/writing and Africa;
  • imperialism, race, and Africa in the Woolfs’ lives and work;
  • teaching Virginia and/or Leonard Woolf in Africa;
  • African perspectives on Virginia’s feminism;
  • African modernisms and Virginia Woolf;
  • post-colonial African literature and Virginia Woolf.

    Please send queries and submissions to Diana L. Swanson at dswanson@niu.edu<mailto:dswanson@niu.edu> .

    Essays should be between 2,500 and 3,000 words and use MLA citation style. Submit files in Word or RTF format.

Read Full Post »

Virginia Woolf Miscellany Winter 2015The most recent issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, Fall 2014/Winter 2015 is now online.

This special issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, edited by Kathryn Simpson and Melinda Harvey, focuses on Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield — a perfect complement to this year’s Woolf conference, the 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries.

Contributors are Hilary Newman, Patricia Moran, Susan Reid, Emily Hinnov, Maria J. Lopez & Gerardo Rodríguez Salas, Rose Onans, Alda Correia and Sandra Inskeep-Fox.

According to Vara Neverow, managing editor, the issue also features “truly miscellaneous” contributions including a woodcut of Virginia Woolf by Loren Kantor and essays by Xiaoqin Cao, Steve Ui-chun Yang, Anne Byrne, Daniel Jordon Varon and Erin M. Kingsley.

Book reviewers are Jane Fisher, Wayne Chapman, Ryan Weberling, Bonnie Kime Scott, Steve Ferebee, Maggie Humm and Peter Stansky.

The issue also includes detailed calls for papers for future issues of the Miscellany and a discount form for ordering the Selected Papers from the 24th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Writing the World in 2014.

Print copies of the issue will be mailed to subscribers and current members of the International Virginia Woolf Society in the near future.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: