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Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf’

Virginia Woolf Talks, a new series of talks for town and gown on Virginia Woolf and her wavescontemporaries, is supported by Lucy Cavendish College and Literature Cambridge.

The series is free and all are welcome. It includes:

  • Dame Gillian Beer on  “Reading The Waves Across a Lifetime,” Jan. 25, 2017, at 1 p.m.
  • Nanette O’Brien on “Prunes and Custard in the Archives: Virginia Woolf and Cambridge Food in A Room of One’s Own, March 3, 2017, at 1 p.m.

Both talks will be held at Lucy Cavendish, Library Seminar Room, Lady Margaret Road, CB3 0BU.

More Woolf events in England

 

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I don’t read a lot of poetry, but I am partial to the work of Anne Carson and Mary Oliver (and oftencoverstory-blitt-significant-others-847x1200-1477066235 confuse the two). It’s no surprise that both have referenced Virginia Woolf in their poems, no doubt recognizing her as the poet she was even though she never wrote a line of verse as such.

Anne Carson has written very little prose, so her story in this week’s (Oct. 31) New Yorker is a lovely gift. “Back the Way You Went” is exquisite, a tiny gem, as it questions so many aspects of existence in a daughter’s reflections on her mother.

The narrator comments on a dishtowel she’s given her mother-in-law, “printed with cartoon cameos of Bloomsbury celebrities.” She’s thinking about her flawed communication with her own mother, recently deceased, their fear of breaking the silence that’s built up between them. She asks herself, “Are other families like this? I know I’m setting the bar high, but I cannot imagine it was ever the wrong time to talk in, say, Bloomsbury.” And yet Woolf may have seen it otherwise; Carson’s narrator goes on to recall a passage from “A Sketch of the Past”:

“We are sealed vessels afloat upon what is convenient to call reality; at some moments, without a reason, without an effort, the sealing matter cracks; in floods reality….”

She asks, “Was it Virginia Woolf who taught us to adore these floods of reality, without which we merely navigate a sea of convenience with other people?”

Even without Woolf, the story is stunning; with her it’s even more so, and, as always seems to be the case when Woolf is referenced in fiction, so appropriate, leading this Woolfian to think, “Well, yes, of course.”

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Woolf talks in Cambridge cancelled

The Clare Hall Cambridge Literary Talks on Virginia Woolf are cancelled for 2016-17. A new series of Woolf talks is planned at another Cambridge venue early in 2017. Details will be available soon. Please contact trudi.tate@gmail.com for further information.

Jacob’s Room Study Day date changed

The new date is Saturday, 11 March 2017, 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., at the Oriental Club First Floor, 11 Stratford Place, London W1C IES

The day will include Dr. Sue Roe, Sarah Phillips and Lindsay Martin. Tickets: £48 for VWSGB members/£50 for non-members and include lunch and refreshments. To book, send cheque made payable to the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain to: Lindsay Martin, 12 Elm Park Road, London N21 2HN and include your address, telephone number and email address for confirmation.

For further details, phone Lindsay Martin on 020 8245 3580 or email lindsay@lindsaycmartin.co.uk

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Sunday, Oct. 16, marks the centenary of the arrival at Charleston of Vanessa Bell, DuncanCharleston Grant and David ‘Bunny’ Garnett. In honor of that, the National Trust property has programs and activities planned for this weekend, as well as into the new year.

They include everything from “Your Country or Your Conscience,” a pacifist theater performance by White Feathers Theatre, to tours of usually unseen parts of the farmhouse ,to art workshops.

The cafe will even have a special menu inspired by the Charleston Garden and The Bloomsbury Cookbook.

Get more details and booking information.

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Editor’s Note: This post is reblogged from The Charleston Attic

As Charleston looks forward to a weekend of Centenary celebrations, ‘The Attic’ is being specially prepared to open its doors for visitors this Sunday 16 October. Rarely on show to the public, the space, accessed by narrow, steep stairs at the top of the farmhouse was once Vanessa Bells’ studio and now stores Charleston’s extensive archive collection and works of art.  

My first blog post as Charleston’s ‘Attic intern’ showcases some of Duncan Grant’s book illustrations and book jacket designs from the 1960s. Newly catalogued from the Angelica Garnett Gift is a collection of Duncan Grant’s correspondence regarding his illustrations for a previously undiscovered short story by Virginia Woolf featuring ‘Nurse Lugton’ and a book jacket design for a novel by Margaret Lane called A smell of burning.  

Source: Book illustrations and jacket designs by Duncan Grant | The Charleston Attic

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After having an essay published last year in Spry Literary Journal, I was invited to contribute to abcsSpry’s ABC series. Writing for Beginners and Fiction Writing would be followed by the ABCs of Creative Nonfiction, and I could write on the letter of my choice.

I quickly claimed the letter “M” with its myriad manifestations–memoir, memory, motivation, and metaphor, to name just a few. And what about mentors and muses? I’d written a chapter, “A Muse of One’s Own,” for the 2014 book Writing after Retirement(yes, of course I spotlight Virginia Woolf!)–so I adapted it for this project.

Editor’s Note: You can finish reading this post on Alice’s blog: ABCs of Creative Nonfiction | Alice Lowe blogs … about writing & reading & Virginia Woolf

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In June, Rohan Maitzen, senior editor at Open Letters Monthly, approached Blogging Woolf. She was seekingnadelwoolf someone to review a new biography of Virginia Woolf.

Zoe Wolstenholme, who joined Blogging Woolf as a contributing writer just this year, readily agreed to review the work by biographer and critic Ira Nadel. Titled Virginia Woolf, it is part of Reaktion Books’ “Critical Lives” series and is included in the University of Chicago Press catalog.

Wolstenholme’s review, “The bowl that one fills and fills,” was published online Oct. 1.

Open Letters Monthly is a monthly arts and literature review with a readership of more than 30,000. The online publication is linked to regularly by Arts & Letters Daily and 3 Quarks Daily, among other sites.

this is truly a Critical Life; the biography focuses on Woolf’s writing and its relationship with both her own and others’ critical thought – Zoe Wolstenholme, “The bowl that one fills and fills,” Open Letters Monthly, Oct. 1, 2016.

Other new tomes

Also included in the current University of Chicago Press Literature and Criticism Catalog are:literature_15_uchicagopress

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