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Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf’

One of Blogging Woolf’s bookshelves

Catherine Hollis, editor of an upcoming themed issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany on “Collecting Woolf” has put out a call for papers. She is hoping to gather both traditional scholarly articles on collecting Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books, as well as shorter pieces about our own collections.

Questions that could be addressed include the following:

  • Who collects Virginia Woolf and Hogarth Press books?
  • When did the demand for and economic value of Woolfs’ and the Hogarth Press’s books begin in the antiquarian book trade?
  • Are Woolf and Hogarth Press books more or less desirable than other modernist first editions?
  • What are the emotional, haptic, and educational values of early Woolf and Hogarth Press editions for scholars, students, and common readers?
  • What do the book collections of Virginia and Leonard Woolf tell us about their lives as readers and writers?

In addition to more formal academic essays, this issue of the Miscellany, in collaboration with Blogging Woolf, will also feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.” Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf’s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself.

If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,000 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 1, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

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Virginia Woolf Talks by leading scholars on Virginia Woolf and her contemporaries are held at Lucy Cavendish College and are free and open to all.
Lent Term 2018

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 1.00 pm
David Trotter
‘Giving the Sign’: Katherine Mansfield’s stories

Tuesday 6 March 2018, 1.00 pm
Aoife Byrne
Elizabeth Bowen’s writings on the Second World War

Venue: Lucy Cavendish College, Lady Margaret Road, Cambridge CB3 0BU
You can read about previous talks on the Literature Cambridge Blog page. 

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From the VWoolf Listserv comes this call for papers.

Virginia Woolf’s atheism and her sharp criticism of religion are well-established in the critical literature. Yet Woolf’s sometimes withering critique of religion belies what might be termed a spiritual sensibility in her work. An upcoming collection seeks to define the spiritual in expansive and interdisciplinary ways that illuminate Woolf’s writing, as well as spirituality itself.

The call for papers for this collections seeks papers on the following:

  • Approaches drawing on theology, psychology, philosophy, geography, and other disciplinary methods
  • Areas of interest might include Woolf’s treatment of sacred spaces; doctrinal or ritualistic language; the soul; illness and its relationship to spiritual experience; spiritual metaphors; spirituality and the body; re-enchantment; writing as spiritual practice; etc.

Submit abstracts of approximately 500 words by March 1, 2018, to Kristina K. Groover, Professor of English, Appalachian State University, at grooverkk@appstate.edu <mailto:grooverkk@appstate.edu>).

Inquiries are welcome.

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This Christmas day, I unwrapped a present from my landlady and, completely unexpectedly, a small purple hardback book with gold lettering and a beautiful portrait of Virginia Woolf fell onto my lap. I was delighted, and proceeded to read it cover to cover amidst wrapping paper and ended up holding back tears to prevent myself being utterly embarrassed in front of my in-laws.

virginia woolf life portraits

© Zena Alkayat and Nina Cosford

Virginia Woolf (Life Portraits) by Zena Alkayat and Nina Cosford poetically weaves the story of Woolf’s life with Alkayat’s considered text and Cosford’s illustrations, a fresh response to the Bloomsbury aesthetic. It opens with the following quote from Mrs Dalloway:

She sliced like a knife through everything; at the same time was on the outside, looking on.

This liminality, both the relation between work and life and Woolf’s psychological flux, is represented thoughtfully throughout the biography.

street haunting in life portrait

© Zena Alkayat and Nina Cosford

Alkayat focuses on the personal details of life: how Vanessa Bell’s sheepdog Gurth accompanied her “street haunting”, how Leonard and Virginia Woolf spent nights during the First World War in their coal cellar sitting on boxes, and that they later named their car “the umbrella”. She also puts us on a first name basis with Virginia, Vanessa and Duncan, et al. – a choice which made me feel closer to their world.

charleston in woolf life portrait

© Nina Cosford

Cosford’s illustrations are both sensitive to the Bloomsbury style and offer a fresh perspective. Her bold lines and patterns used to illustrate the pages about Vanessa Bell’s cover designs for Virginia Woolf’s novels, for example, are edged with mark-making in the mode of Bell. Her use of colour also seems emotive, following the waves of high and low that punctuate the narrative. Her illustrations capture the paraphernalia of every-day life, from the objects atop Woolf’s writing desk – diary, hair grips, photo of Julia, sweets – to the plants in the garden at Monks House, bringing Virginia’s life closer to home.

monks house plants

© Nina Cosford

Illustration and text come together beautifully in this miniature autobiography and would provide any reader with a poetic and surprising escape into the life of Virginia Woolf.

 

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Virginia Woolf in Words and Pictures, an illustrated talk by Frances Spalding, will be held Wednesday, January 24, 1-2 p.m. in celebration of Woolf’s Jan. 25 birthday, as well as the publication of Frances Spalding’s new book The Illustrated Letters of  Virginia Woolf.

Location for the talk is Waterstones, 82 Gower Street, London.

Tickets are £5 and £3 for students and are available online or by telephone 020 7636 1577.

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This banner promoting fundraising for the Virginia Woolf statue was displayed at the banquet at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at the University of Reading.

Virginia Woolf will be seated on a bench at Richmond upon Thames, Riverside, for all to see — and sit next to — if a heritage project seeking £50,000 through crowd-funding is successful.

Arts and education charity Aurora Metro launched the project to create the first ever life-sized, full-figure bronze depiction of Woolf. The London Borough of Richmond has recently given the public the opportunity to comment on the proposal via a consultation document on its website. Deadline for commenting is Dec. 10.

Society says sculptor fails to capture Woolf

The executive council of the Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain has discussed the proposal and told the Borough of Richmond that, although it fully endorses the idea of a full-figure statue of Woolf in the Borough to memorialize the importance of her time there, unfortunately it feels that sculptor Laury Dizengremel has not captured Woolf’s likeness, according to an email the group sent members.  The IVWS membership agrees.

See for yourself

You can see for yourself by visiting the Aurora Metro website, where you can view three photos depicting the statue. You can make a donation at that page as well. The statue project also has a Facebook page.

If you would like to volunteer to help raise funds for the Virginia Woolf statue, contact info@aurorametro.com

Movement for more women

The Woolf statue is part of a movement to see more women memorialized as statues around Great Britain.

In March 2016 in the New Statesman, Caroline Criado-Perez surveyed the nation’s statues by gender and discovered “a mere 2.7 per cent are of historical, non-royal women. If you’re a woman, your best chance at becoming a statue is to be a mythical or allegorical figure, a famous virgin, royal or nude.”

She has also launched a campaign to get a statue of a suffragette erected in Parliament Square and has a petition asking the Mayor of London to do so.

 

 

 

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