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Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf’

The deadline is extended to Sept. 30 for the call for papers for an upcoming issue of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany focused on “Collecting Woolf.” Get the details.

In addition to more formal academic essays, the issue will collaborate with Blogging Woolf to feature a special section called “Our Bookshelves, Ourselves.”

Our book collections tell stories about our reading lives and also about our lives in the larger community of Woolf?s readers and scholars. In fact, a history of our bookshelves might begin to tell a history of the International Virginia Woolf Society itself.

If you are a “common book collector,” and your books tell a story about your immersion in Woolf or Hogarth Press studies, tell us about it. If you have interesting strategies or stories about acquiring collectible editions of Woolf and Hogarth Press books on a budget, let us know!

Send submissions of 2,000 words for longer essays and 500 words for “Our Bookshelves” by Sept. 30, 2018, to Catherine Hollis via hollisc@berkeley.edu

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Literature Cambridge will offer two interesting summer courses next year.

Virginia Woolf’s writing Lodge at Monk’s House

Virginia Woolf’s Gardens will be held July 14-19. The course will emphasize the importance of gardens to Woolf’s life and work, from her early story “Kew Gardens” (1917) to her last novel, Between the Acts (1941).

Other course readings include Jacob’s Room (1922), Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), Orlando (1928) and A Room of One’s Own (1929).

Lecturers include Suzanne Raitt, Gillian Beer, Alison Hennegan, Clare Walker Gore, Karina Jakubowicz, Nadine Tschacksch, Trudi Tate, Kabe Wilson and Caroline Holmes.

An optional visit to Monk’s House and Charleston will be offered.

Fictions of Home: Jane Austen to the Present Day will be held July 21-26 at Wolfson College, Cambridge. The course explores ideas of home in literature, from the early nineteenth century until today, from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Northanger Abbey, through Dickens, Katherine Mansfield, and Virginia Woolf, ending with contemporary refugee writers.

The provisional course reading list includes Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813); Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey (written 1798; published 1817); Charles Dickens, David Copperfield (1850);
Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway (1925); Katherine Mansfield, Collected Short Stories (mainly 1920s);
Viet Nguyen, The Refugees (2017); Viet Nguyen, The Displaced: Refugee Writers on Refugee Lives (2018); David Herd and Anna Pincus, eds., Refugee Tales II (2017).

Instructors include Alison Hennegan, Isobel Maddison, Clare Walker Gore, and Trudi Tate.

Bookings open soon.

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Anne Olivier Bell, art scholar, Bloomsbury matriarch, widow of Virginia Woolf’s nephew Quentin, and editor of her diaries, died yesterday at the age of 102.

Bell also helped Quentin pen his 1972 biography of his aunt and the two were instrumental in saving Charleston Farmhouse, preserving it for future generations of Bloomsbury scholars and fans.

In addition, she was known for playing an instrumental role in saving European art from the Nazis during World  II, serving in the Monuments Men effort.

As a result of her marriage to Quentin, Olivier moved into the heartland of the Bloomsbury milieu and, having inherited its values, became one of the most vigorous (and vigilant) guardians and promoters of the Bloomsbury revival. – “Anne Olivier Bell obituary,” The Guardian, July 19, 2018.

Read The Guardian obituary.

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Virginia Woolf scholar Maggie Humm brought Woolf into the mix at the June 21 celebration of #WoolwichWomenRise!

Humm carried a placard paying homage to Kathleen Rance, Mayoress of Woolwich in 1937 ‘who would not as much as darn a sock to help a war,’ according to Woolf in Three Guineas (1938). It was the first time Woolf has been paraded through Woolwich as part of the Greenwich Festival’ Rise.

Maggie Humm (right) carrying a placard honoring Rance. It includes Woolf’s quote on the rear. With her is the current Mayor of Greenwich, which now incorporates Woolwich, holding a placard to the first woman Mayor of Woolwich (1930-1931).

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Blogging Woolf’s photos from the 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held at Woolf College at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, are now available via Flickr. If you were there, see if you can spot yourself. If you weren’t, see who was.

You can access them via the top link in the right sidebar or take a look here.

Read about #Woolf2018 and #DallowayDay

You can also read more posts about the conference, along with those covering Woolf-related pre-conference travel and events in the UK:

 

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A fabulous four days of Virginia Woolf in the company of Woolfians from around the world ended today.

And as we all scatter to various parts of the globe, we look forward to connecting again next year for the 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf: Woolf and Social Justice at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 6-9, 2019.

Blogging Woolf’s tweets from the last two days are below, along with a message from The Woolf Project.

Note from The Woolf Project coordinator Emma Bainbridge thanking conference-goers for their help in creating a crocheted and knitted chair cover that will be reworked into blankets for Knit for Peace.

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Virginia Woolf knitted. Vanessa Bell crocheted. And we are doing both at #Woolf2018.

V Woolf knitting portrait

Vanessa Bell painting of Woolf knitting in an armchair

The 28th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at Woolf College at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, includes the Woolf Project. And like the theme of the conference — Virginia Woolf, Europe, and Peace — the Woolf Project focuses on peace as well.

Woolf knitting

It reimagines Bell’s portrait of Woolf knitting in an armchair by covering it with pieces knitted and crocheted by conference-goers and University of Kent staff.

Throughout the conference, participants are picking up knitting needles and crochet hooks and choosing yarn from a basket full of colorful skeins and balls to fashion squares and other shapes. These are being joined together to cover an armchair placed in the midst of the conference space.

Knit for Peace

Once the conference is over, the chair cover will be taken apart by Emma Brainbridge of Kent, who has overseen the project, and transformed into blankets for the charity Knit for Peace.

knitting is the saving of life – Virginia Woolf

The Woolf Project in action

A variety of yarn,, hooks, and needles are available for conference-goers to pick up and use.

Emma Bainbridge of Kent with the armchair in its nearly complete cover, complete with accessory pillow.

The Woolf Project armchair covered in crocheted and knitted squares and other shapes created by conference-goers.

Even the back of the armchair is covered with handwork of many colors, shapes, and designs.

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