Posts Tagged ‘Virginia Woolf’

Sunday, Oct. 16, marks the centenary of the arrival at Charleston of Vanessa Bell, DuncanCharleston Grant and David ‘Bunny’ Garnett. In honor of that, the National Trust property has programs and activities planned for this weekend, as well as into the new year.

They include everything from “Your Country or Your Conscience,” a pacifist theater performance by White Feathers Theatre, to tours of usually unseen parts of the farmhouse ,to art workshops.

The cafe will even have a special menu inspired by the Charleston Garden and The Bloomsbury Cookbook.

Get more details and booking information.

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Editor’s Note: This post is reblogged from The Charleston Attic

As Charleston looks forward to a weekend of Centenary celebrations, ‘The Attic’ is being specially prepared to open its doors for visitors this Sunday 16 October. Rarely on show to the public, the space, accessed by narrow, steep stairs at the top of the farmhouse was once Vanessa Bells’ studio and now stores Charleston’s extensive archive collection and works of art.  

My first blog post as Charleston’s ‘Attic intern’ showcases some of Duncan Grant’s book illustrations and book jacket designs from the 1960s. Newly catalogued from the Angelica Garnett Gift is a collection of Duncan Grant’s correspondence regarding his illustrations for a previously undiscovered short story by Virginia Woolf featuring ‘Nurse Lugton’ and a book jacket design for a novel by Margaret Lane called A smell of burning.  

Source: Book illustrations and jacket designs by Duncan Grant | The Charleston Attic

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After having an essay published last year in Spry Literary Journal, I was invited to contribute to abcsSpry’s ABC series. Writing for Beginners and Fiction Writing would be followed by the ABCs of Creative Nonfiction, and I could write on the letter of my choice.

I quickly claimed the letter “M” with its myriad manifestations–memoir, memory, motivation, and metaphor, to name just a few. And what about mentors and muses? I’d written a chapter, “A Muse of One’s Own,” for the 2014 book Writing after Retirement(yes, of course I spotlight Virginia Woolf!)–so I adapted it for this project.

Editor’s Note: You can finish reading this post on Alice’s blog: ABCs of Creative Nonfiction | Alice Lowe blogs … about writing & reading & Virginia Woolf

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In June, Rohan Maitzen, senior editor at Open Letters Monthly, approached Blogging Woolf. She was seekingnadelwoolf someone to review a new biography of Virginia Woolf.

Zoe Wolstenholme, who joined Blogging Woolf as a contributing writer just this year, readily agreed to review the work by biographer and critic Ira Nadel. Titled Virginia Woolf, it is part of Reaktion Books’ “Critical Lives” series and is included in the University of Chicago Press catalog.

Wolstenholme’s review, “The bowl that one fills and fills,” was published online Oct. 1.

Open Letters Monthly is a monthly arts and literature review with a readership of more than 30,000. The online publication is linked to regularly by Arts & Letters Daily and 3 Quarks Daily, among other sites.

this is truly a Critical Life; the biography focuses on Woolf’s writing and its relationship with both her own and others’ critical thought – Zoe Wolstenholme, “The bowl that one fills and fills,” Open Letters Monthly, Oct. 1, 2016.

Other new tomes

Also included in the current University of Chicago Press Literature and Criticism Catalog are:literature_15_uchicagopress

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Well no, but they do hang out together in a novel, along with Sylvia Plath, Paul Auster, Margaret Atwood, W.B. Yeats, and others. It’s Lexicon by Max Barry. “A cerebral thriller,” according to one blurb; “dark and twisted and sweet and humane all at once,” says another.

It starts with two guys grabbing a man named Wil in an airport bathroom and putting a needle in his eye to extract memories and lethal words. And they have to hurry or Wolf will get him first.

On page 46—at last!—one of the guys, Tom, explains that they’re called poets because they’re good with words. They’re quick and smart and persuasive, and when their raw potential is detected, they’re recruited from all over and sent to a special school to learn how to manipulate minds with secret words. Only the best will graduate and be given their names. Wolf is a poet, Wolf who turns out to be Woolf. “Virginia Woolf is trying to kill me?” asks Wil. “Among others. But Woolf is the one to worry about,” replies Tom, who turns out to be Eliot.

It takes a long time to separate the good guys from the bad, and then you got it wrong, or maybe not, and you’re still not sure. Did Woolf kill everyone in an Australian town? Which side is Tom on? Why is Charlotte driving a transport truck straight at them? Where does Wil fit in–he’s not Shakespeare, not a poet. And why am I reading this bizarre novel?

If I wondered to what lengths I’d go to chase down Woolf sightings in contemporary fiction, now I know. If I wondered to what lengths I’d go to make it up to Paula for not posting as often as I should on Blogging Woolf, now I know. The violence was off-putting, and I wasn’t sure I wanted to keep reading; then I was hooked. People being murdered at close range on one page, thought-provoking gems about the power of language on another. And Woolf.

That’s what I never figured out—why Woolf? All the rest are actual poets or at least, like Bronte and Atwood, have written poetry as well as prose. Max Barry has a Q&A feature on his website, and I asked him about this, but I haven’t gotten a response—I’ll let you know if I do.

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Which is the greater ecstasy?  The man’s or the woman’s? And are they not perhaps the same?”  – Virginia Woolf, Orlando

Following the very successful performance of “Intolerance” at Onassis Cultural Centre, Io Voulgaraki is now adapting and directing Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece Orlando, starring Amalia Kavali, with support from the British Council.

orlando-3According to publicity materials: “This performance shows us Orlando in the present, in her “here” and “now” just before her end. In such a time, she tells us of the greatest moments of her life in her ultimate endeavor to achieve human contact. Through the process of recollection, she faces her most extreme experiences, at times earthly and natural and at others transcendental. She begins her narration from the start, as we always do when facing death or the unknown.”

The performance is in Greek, in a new translation by Dr. Niketas Siniossoglou.

The company expects to travel and perform in the UK later next year. “At least we would all love to visit and perform in the Woolfian birthplace and will do our best to achieve it,” wrote actress Amalia Kavali in an email to Blogging Woolf.

Opening: Sept. 30 through Dec. 4
Dates & times: Friday – Saturday – Sunday at 21:00
Running Time: 70 minutes
Tickets: 12 € general admission, 8 € concessions
Address: Skrow Theater, 5 Arhellaou Street, Pagrati, Athens, Greece
Reservations: 210 7235 842  (11:00 a.m – 14:00 p.m. and 17:00 p.m. – 20:30 p.m.)

Contact: Maria Tsolaki | 6974 76 78 90, 210 76 27 966 | mtsolaki@gmail.com

Translation: Niketas Siniossoglou
Adaptation – Direction: Io Voulgaraki
Stage and Costume design: Magdalene Avgerinou
Stage Lighting: Karol Jarek
Hair designer: Alex Scissors
Make-up designer: Marina Stat
Programme & Poster Photographs by: Kiki Papadopoulou
Teaser-Trailer: Sebastian Fragopoulos
Performer: Amalia Kavali

Download the flyer, which appears on Page 63 of the current issue of the magazine, Greece is at http://www.greece-is.com/greece-is-democracy-2016/.


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David Bradshaw, professor of English literature at Worcester College at Oxford University and a plenary speaker at the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf held June 16-19 at Leeds Trinity University, died Sept. 13. He had been ill with cancer.

David Bradshaw at his plenary talk at this year's Virginia Woolf conference.

David Bradshaw giving his plenary talk at this year’s Virginia Woolf conference at Leeds Trinity University.

At the conference, Mr. Bradshaw gave a talk titled “‘The Very Centre of the Very Centre’: Herbert Fisher, Oxbridge and ‘That Great Patriarchal Machine’.” In his talk, he quoted Woolf as saying that her contact with Fisher “brought back my parents more than anyone else I knew.”

Vara Neverow, editor of the Virginia Woolf Miscellany, invites those who knew Mr. Bradshaw to share their memories of him for that publication. “The publication of such recollections would be much valued by others, whether they knew David himself or knew only his scholarship,” she wrote in a message to the VWoolf Listserv.

Tributes to Mr. Bradshaw, who has been called “one of the great recent scholars of modernism,” prevailed on the list after news of his death was announced. Here are just a few:

I miss him already – Bonnie Scott

Just joining in the chorus of sorry over this sad news. I had heard he was ill but, I regret to say that I cherished the luxury of denial. I’m just so very very sad. He was such a funny, warm, silly, vital, brilliant, generous person. It was always a joy to see him and I learned so much from him. To this day, whenever I give a paper I remember his admonishment to himself once–“don’t get distracted, David,”–which he uttered aloud to great effect years ago. Sharing his digressive streak, I loved that so much. And, of course, almost every note of his Dalloway appears, with credit, in my edition. I owe him so much. What a terrible loss. – Anne Fernald

His plenary at Leeds was special. I have often and continue to teach from his considerable body of work. This is a terribly sad loss. My heart goes out to his family and many friends. – Jean Mills

Such an unbelievably sad loss. A superb scholar and wonderfully witty and generous man. – Maggie Humm

His colleagues in the Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh project also posted their tributes on the Waugh and Words blog on the University of Leicester website.

Mr. Bradshaw specialized in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century literature and had written many articles on literature, politics and ideas in the period 1880-1945, especially in relation to the work of Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Aldous Huxley and W. B. Yeats, according to the Worcester College website.

His current projects included an edition of Woolf’s Jacob’s Room (CUP) with Stuart N. Clarke and a monograph “in train” that he said “will examine the ways in which Woolf, Waugh and Huxley challenged the culture of their time through their provocative engagement with the obscene.”

His books related to Woolf include:

  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, The Waves, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015).
  • (Ed., with Stuart N. Clarke) Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, Shakespeare Head Press Edition of Virginia Woolf (Chichester and Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015).
  • (Ed., with Ian Blyth) Virginia Woolf, The Years, Shakespeare Head Press Edition of Virginia Woolf (Chichester and Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, Selected Essays, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).
  • (Ed.) The Cambridge Companion to E. M. Forster (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007). I also contributed the chapter on `Howards End’ (see below).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, Carlyle’s House and Other Sketches (London: Hesperus, 2003). Incorporated into the 2nd, rev. ed. ofA Passionate Apprentice: The Early Journals of Virginia Woolf, ed. Mitchell A. Leaska (London: Pimlico, 2004).
  • Winking, Buzzing, Carpet-Beating: Reading `Jacob’s Room’, 4th Annual Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain Birthday Lecture (Southport: Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain, 2003).
  • (Ed.) Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway, `Oxford’s World’s Classics’ series (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).

His articles related to Woolf include:

David Bradshaw (center front) with colleagues at the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held June 16-19 at Leeds Trinity University

David Bradshaw (center front) with colleagues at the 26th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, held June 16-19 at Leeds Trinity University

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